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Hispanic Business 500: Healthy Performance

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TALLEST AMONG THE TALL
Related stands tallest among a small group of giant Hispanic companies that continue to grow fast despite their size. They include second-ranked Brightstar Corp., which grew $515 million; number 4 Molina Healthcare with an increase of $500 million; number 9 General Real Estate Corp., up $285 million; seventh-ranked Prestige Builders Partners with $247 million in growth; number 6 International Bancshares with an increase of almost $189 million; and third-ranked Burt Automotive with over $184 million in fresh revenues.

Together, these seven companies represent $3.04 billion in growth revenues, or 66 percent of the growth among the entire 500.

STEADY GROWTH IN MIDDLE MARKET
However, only 60 companies on the directory reported lower revenues than in the previous year, indicating that most of the 500 experienced incremental growth. Given the similar figures from last year´s directory (when five companies accounted for more than half the composite growth), it appears the directory has split between the fast-growing, well-capitalized top of the pyramid and the slow-but-steadily growing bulk of the list that represents the Hispanic middle-market economy. The generalization that larger companies grew faster than smaller ones becomes clear in an examination of the largest 100 companies.

As a group, the top 100 accounted for 78.2 percent of the 500´s revenues, up a step from 77.2 percent for the 2004 directory.Moreover, the top 100 grew their revenues by 16.6 percent, higher than the average for the entire 500. Since 2001, revenues have steadily concentrated among the top 100 (see table, "Revenues of the Top 100 Companies").

WORKFORCE EXPANDING
According to a survey of CEOs, "market conditions" and "competition" still rank as the two main obstacles to growth (cited by 33.4 and 16.4 percent of respondents respectively), but the importance of these factors has mellowed since 2004.More CEOs now name "labor shortage" as their main problem (14 percent), putting it on nearly the same plane as "competition," and likely reflecting a re-energizing job market.

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