News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Anchoring Element and Method", for Approval

September 11, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventor Laster, Zvi (Poriya Elite, IL), filed on April 28, 2014, was made available online on August 28, 2014.

The patent's assignee is Cortex Dental Implants Industries, Ltd.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Various different methods or techniques are known for securing dental prostheses with a patient's oral cavity. One illustrative example of a procedure that uses anchoring elements may be dental prostheses using embedded anchoring elements. However, the exemplary embodiments, and the description and drawings disclosing the same, should be interpreted by way of illustrative purposes only without limiting the scope of the present invention disclosure. Other types of procedures may well be considered as applicable for the utilization of the presently disclosed anchoring elements.

"More particularly, dental anchoring elements may provide a desirable prosthesis for patients who are missing one or more natural teeth. A dental anchoring element may include an anchoring element that may be embedded into the jawbone and a prosthetic tooth that is attached to and supported by the anchoring element. The prosthetic tooth may be attached directly to the anchoring element or an abutment fixture may be attached to the anchoring element and support the prosthetic tooth in turn. An appropriate anchoring element will support bone growth that invades the anchoring element such that the anchoring element becomes integrated with the surrounding bone in a process termed osseointegration. However, other types of anchoring elements, designed to be embedded and/or integrated with living bone tissue, may also be included in the scope of the present disclosure.

"An anchoring element for supporting a prosthetic tooth may be embedded in what is termed a two-stage procedure. In the first stage, the anchoring element is embedded into the jawbone and the surgical site is then closed. After a period of several months the anchoring element will achieve osseointegration. The site of the anchoring element is then re-opened surgically to allow the attachment of a prosthetic tooth.

"Other techniques may be employed to permit a dental anchoring element to be embedded in a one-stage procedure. In a one-stage procedure, the anchoring element is embedded and a prosthetic tooth is immediately fitted thereto. The immediately fitted prosthetic tooth may be an interim prosthesis that allows the soft tissue to properly heal and maintains the spacing and alignment of adjacent teeth during the period of osseointegration. A permanent prosthetic tooth may be fitted at a later date after at least some osseointegration has occurred, generally without requiring an additional surgical procedure.

"To achieve successful osseointegration it is desirable that the anchoring element fit closely into the surrounding bone. It is also be desirable that the anchoring element does not move relative to the surrounding bone during the period of osseointegration. Where the anchoring element cannot be closely fitted to the surrounding bone, it may be necessary to use bone-grafting materials to fill the space between the anchoring element and the surrounding bone.

"Molars are commonly missing teeth. However, many times, the use of an anchoring element to replace a molar may present some special difficulties, as molars may generally have multiple roots. The mandibular molars of the lower jaw generally have two roots. The maxillary molars of the upper jaw generally have three roots. In a fresh extraction site, the void left by the molar roots presents a site that can be difficult to fit with an anchoring element. In addition, the bone in the molar region of the jaw may generally consist of a thin, hard layer of cortical bone surrounding a core of softer, spongy, cancellous bone. The cancellous bone may provide a lesser, or an even poorer support, for the anchoring element.

"As molars may generally be relatively large teeth, it may be desirable to use an anchoring element having a relatively large diameter to fill the void following an extraction. However, the use of a wide anchoring element may require that a significant amount of bone be removed from the extraction site to accommodate the anchoring element. This may leave only a small amount of cortical bone available to support the anchoring element which may be embedded in predominantly cancellous bone. In particular, the use of a wide anchoring element may require the removal of a triangular mound-shaped mass of bone that is found between the roots and is known as the interradicular bone. Thus, it may prove difficult to place an anchoring element in a fresh molar extraction site with sufficient stability to allow the embedding of the dental anchoring element.

"An option sometime practiced during the anchoring procedure of molars is called or referred to as 'asymmetric loading'. In asymmetric loading, an anchoring element may be implanted in only one of the two (in the case of a mandibular molar extraction) or three (in the case of a maxillary molar extraction) root voids that remain post extraction. Such optional asymmetric loading may lead to reduced stability, which may lead to undesirable osseointegration and/or reduced strength and/or stability of the anchoring element.

"Another circumstance that can present difficulties in placing an anchoring element within a patient's mouth may occur in cases where it is desired to place a dental prosthesis into a healed extraction site. When a molar is lost, the alveolar ridge that supports the teeth may be fairly rapidly re-absorbed. This may lead to a loss of height of the jawbone in the area of tooth loss. When an anchoring element is to be embedded into a healed extraction site, it may not be possible to insert the anchoring element to a desirably large depth.

"In the lower jaw, the presence of the mandibular alveolar nerve in the lower jaw may limit the depth to which the anchoring element can be inserted. In the upper jaw, the maxillary sinus may likewise limit the depth to which the anchoring element can be inserted. These limiting anatomical features may require the use of a short anchoring element, the use of which for such cases may result in a lower rate of long-term success because of the reduced surface area available for osseointegration.

"It would be desirable to have an anchoring element that can be used to place a dental anchoring element into the molar area both for fresh extraction sites and for healed sites, as well as an associated method therefore, which may facilitate the above. This may be attained with the subject matter in accordance with the following."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "In the following disclosure, aspects thereof are described and illustrated in conjunction with systems and methods which are meant to be exemplary and illustrative, not limiting in scope. In various embodiments, one or more of the above-described issues and/or desirable effects have been addressed, while other aspects are directed to affect other advantages or improvements.

"According to one aspect of the present disclosure, an anchoring element for use in bone is provided, the anchoring element having a distal end and an apical end.

"Preferably, the anchoring element to which the present disclosure relates may comprise an anchoring element body having a longitudinal axis .zeta. defining an apical-to-distal direction and a threading in direction T.sub.i.

"Furthermore, the anchoring element comprises an external wall having externally threaded peripheral surface facilitating the embedding of said anchoring element within the bone, an internal wall having an internal peripheral surface that, taken together with said externally threaded peripheral surface, define an annular wall around a hollow central portion and around a longitudinal axis .zeta., and at least one non-radial slot passing through said externally threaded peripheral surface of said external wall, said annular wall, and said internal peripheral surface of said internal wall, such that at least one pointed fluke is defined at a juncture of said non-radial slot and said outer peripheral surface for cutting the bone and directing bone fragments into said hollow central portion, wherein said at least one pointed fluke extends from a fluke leading face to a fluke trailing face, and wherein said fluke leading face is skewed relatively to said fluke trailing face.

"In some embodiments, threads of the externally threaded outer peripheral surface are self-threading.

"In some embodiments, the internal peripheral surface of said anchoring element is threaded.

"In some embodiments, the external wall has a conical shape.

"In some embodiments, the hollow central portion has a conical shape.

"In some embodiments, the hollow central portion further comprises a cylindrical portion.

"In some embodiments, the external threading on the conical portion has a different pitch than the pitch of the external threading of the cylindrical section.

"In some embodiments, the at least one pointed fluke curves circumferentially and radially inwardly.

"In some embodiments, the fluke leading face defines a fluke outer leading edge as the fluke leading face meets the outer peripheral surface, and a fluke inner leading edge as the fluke leading face meets the inner peripheral surface, while the fluke trailing face defines a fluke outer trailing edge as the fluke trailing edge meets the outer peripheral surface and a fluke inner trailing edge as the fluke trailing face meets the inner peripheral surface.

"In some embodiments, the fluke leading face extends between the fluke outer leading edge and the fluke inner leading edge, and wherein the fluke trailing face extends between the fluke outer trailing edge and the fluke inner trailing edge.

"In some embodiments, the fluke leading face is angled at a leading angle .lamda. relative to a tangent T.sub..lamda. with respect to the outer peripheral surface at the fluke outer leading edge.

"In some embodiments, the fluke trailing face is angled at a trailing angle .theta. relative to a tangent T.sub..theta. with respect to the outer peripheral surface at the fluke outer trailing edge.

"In some embodiments, at least one of the leading angle .lamda. and the trailing angle .theta. is constant.

"In some embodiments, at least one of the leading angle .lamda. and the trailing angle .theta. varies along an axial extent E of the at least one non-radial slot.

"In some embodiments, the leading angle .lamda. is acute.

"In some embodiments, the leading angle .lamda. is in the range between 30.degree. and 55.degree. degrees.

"In some embodiments, the trailing angle .theta. is obtuse.

"In some embodiments, the ratio between the leading angle .lamda. and trailing angle .theta. is in the range between 0.2 and 0.4.

"In some embodiments, a normal v.sub..lamda. to the fluke leading face at the fluke outer leading edge is directed generally inwardly towards the longitudinal axis .zeta.

"In some embodiments, a normal v.sub..lamda. to the fluke leading face at the fluke outer leading edge is directed generally outwardly away from the longitudinal axis .zeta.

"According to another aspect, the anchoring element comprises an external wall having a conical shape with externally threaded peripheral surface facilitating the embedding of the anchoring element within the bone, and an internal wall having an internal peripheral surface that, taken together with the externally threaded peripheral surface, define an annular wall around a conical hollow central portion, wherein said hollow central portion further comprises a cylindrical portion.

"In some embodiments, the external threading on the conical portion has a different pitch than the pitch of the external threading of the cylindrical section.

"Yet another aspect of the present disclosure comprises a method for placing an anchoring element into the oral cavity which is intended to receive an attachment to a bone, comprising: providing the anchoring element described above, further comprising a locating recess with internal threading, providing an abutment having a hollow structure with internal threading, providing a screw having a bottom portion with external threading corresponding to the internal threading of the abutment, and further corresponding to the internal threading of the locating recess, providing a drilling tool having an annular drilling element with a cutting section and a plurality of indexing lines, providing a milling tool having an annular milling element with a conical shape and external threading with an upper surface edge and a single indexing line corresponding to the plurality of indexing lines of the annular drilling element, drilling with the cutting section of the drilling tool, to a predetermined depth until a predetermined indexing line aligns with the bone surface, milling and creating a conical thread with the external threading of the milling tool to a predetermined depth until the single indexing line aligns with the bone surface, trimming bone chips with the upper surface edge of the annular milling element, rotating the anchoring element and inserting into the bone, such that the threading of the anchoring element engages the bone, attaching the abutment to the anchoring element, and inserting the screw to engage the internal threading of the abutment and of the anchoring element.

"In some embodiments, the annular drilling element further has at least one window.

"In some embodiments, the annular milling element further has at least one indentation.

"In addition to the exemplary aspects and embodiments described above, further aspects and embodiments will become apparent by reference to the following detailed description and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"Exemplary embodiments are illustrated in referenced drawing figures. It is intended that the embodiments and figures disclosed herein are to be considered illustrative rather than restrictive. It is emphasized that, according to common practice, the various features of the drawing are not to scale, but rather dimensions of various features are arbitrarily expanded or reduced for clarity.

"Reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

"FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the apical end of a first exemplary anchoring element for use within bone, according to an exemplary embodiment.

"FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the distal end of the first anchoring element shown in FIG. 1.

"FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the first anchoring element shown in FIG. 1.

"FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the apical end of a second exemplary anchoring element for use within bone, according to an exemplary embodiment.

"FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the distal end of the second anchoring element shown in FIG. 4.

"FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the apical end of the second anchoring element shown in FIG. 5.

"FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the apical end of a third exemplary anchoring element for use within bone, according to an exemplary embodiment.

"FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the distal end of the third anchoring element shown in FIG. 7.

"FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the apical end of the third anchoring element shown in FIG. 7.

"FIG. 10A is a bottom view of a further exemplary embodiment of a fourth anchoring element.

"FIG. 10B is an enlarged segment of the fourth anchoring element shown in FIG. 10A.

"FIG. 11A is a bottom view of a further exemplary embodiment of the fourth anchoring element having four slots.

"FIG. 11B is a bottom view of a further exemplary embodiment of the fourth anchoring element having only one slot.

"FIG. 12 is a frontal view of a drilling tool.

"FIG. 13A is a frontal view of a milling tool.

"FIG. 13B is a cross-sectional view of the milling tool.

"FIG. 13C is a bottom view of the milling tool.

"FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of the groove created in the bone after drilling and milling procedures.

"FIG. 15 is a further exemplary embodiment of a fifth anchoring element.

"FIG. 16A is a cross-sectional view of the fifth anchoring element.

"FIG. 16B is a bottom view of the fifth anchoring element.

"FIG. 17A is an isometric view of an abutment.

"FIG. 17B is a bottom isometric view of the abutment.

"FIG. 18A is an isometric view of a screw.

"FIG. 18B is a cross-sectional view of the screw.

"FIG. 19A is an isometric view of a first rotation key.

"FIG. 19B is an isometric view of a second rotation key.

"FIG. 20A is an assembled view of the fifth anchoring element, the abutment, and the screw prior to inserting the screw into the fifth anchoring element.

"FIG. 20B is an assembled view of the fifth anchoring element, the abutment, and the screw after inserting the screw into the fifth anchoring element.

"FIG. 21A is an exploded view of the fifth anchoring element, and the healing cap.

"FIG. 21B is an assembled view of the fifth anchoring element, and the healing cap."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Laster, Zvi. Anchoring Element and Method. Filed April 28, 2014 and posted August 28, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=2895&p=58&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140821.PD.&OS=PD/20140821&RS=PD/20140821

Keywords for this news article include: Bone Research, Dentistry, Medical Devices, Prosthetics.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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