News Column

Findings from University of British Columbia Update Knowledge of Chemical Engineering (A Quantitative Analysis Of Turbulent Drag Reduction In A...

September 10, 2014



Findings from University of British Columbia Update Knowledge of Chemical Engineering (A Quantitative Analysis Of Turbulent Drag Reduction In A Hydrocyclone)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Engineering -- Fresh data on Chemical Engineering are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Vancouver, Canada, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Turbulent drag reduction has been observed to occur over a wide range of additive systems, such as solution of synthetic or natural polymers, and fibre suspensions. In this study, the influence of softwood kraft pulp fibres and synthetic polymer additives on turbulent drag reduction (DR) in a hydrocyclone is investigated."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of British Columbia, "It was demonstrated that cellulose fibre suspensions and aqueous polymeric solutions reduce the fluid energy losses in comparison to water during hydrocyclone operation within the range of reject ratios studied. A maximum drag reduction of 58% and 55% was found to occur at a volume split fraction of 50% for a 0.9% fibre suspension and a 300ppm anionic polyacrylamide solution, respectively. Polymer degradation or polymer chain decay displayed adverse effects for 100ppm and 150ppm solutions after 22min of run time at 11.2kW pumping power and a reject ratio of 25%. Synergistic effects were observed with pulp suspensions containing both cationic and anionic polyacrylamide (CPAM and APAM, respectively); a maximum DR of 41% was observed for a 0.7% fibre suspension containing 100-300ppm of polymer at a reject ratio of 50%. Similarly to aqueous polymer solutions, the degradation of 300ppm APAM or CPAM in a 0.7% fibre suspension decreased the observed DR up to 38% after 30min of run time at 11.2kW pumping power and a reject ratio of 25%."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The near 43% reduction in CPAM concentration, due to surface adsorption, when present in a 0.7% fibre suspension assisted in quantifying the DR variations observed between suspensions containing APAM or CPAM."

For more information on this research see: A Quantitative Analysis Of Turbulent Drag Reduction In A Hydrocyclone. Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, 2014;92(8):1432-1443. Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1939-019X)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. MacKenzie, University of British Columbia, Center Pulp & Paper, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. Additional authors for this research include D.M. Martinez and J.A. Olson.

Keywords for this news article include: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, North and Central America, Chemical Engineering

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Journal of Engineering


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters