News Column

Study Results from University of Hawaii Provide New Insights into Immune System (Single-walled carbon nanotube exposure induces membrane...

September 12, 2014



Study Results from University of Hawaii Provide New Insights into Immune System (Single-walled carbon nanotube exposure induces membrane rearrangement and suppression of receptor-mediated signalling pathways in model mast cells)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Immune System. According to news originating from Honolulu, Hawaii, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are environmental challenges to the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, and to the dermal immune system. Mast cells (MC) are pro-inflammatory immunocytes that reside at these interfaces with the environment."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Hawaii, "Mast cells are sources of pro-inflammatory mediators (histamine, serotonin, matrix-active proteases, eicosanoids, prostanoids, cytokines and chemokines), which are released in a calcium-dependent manner following immunological challenge or physico-chemical stimulation. Since C-60 fullerenes, which share geometry with CNT, are suppressive of mast cell-driven inflammatory responses, we explored the effects of unmodified SWCNT aggregates on mast cell signaling pathways, phenotype and pro-inflammatory function. We noted SWCNT suppression of antigen-induced signalling pathways and pro-inflammatory degranulation responses. Mast cells recognize unmodified SWCNT by remodeling the plasma membrane, disaggregating the cortical actin cytoskeleton and relocalizing clathrin. Clathrin was also identified as a component of an affinity-purified 'interactome' isolated from MC using an SWCNT affinity matrix for mast cell lysates."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Together, these data are consistent with the ability of SWCNT to suppress mast cell pro-inflammatory function via a novel recognition mechanism."

For more information on this research see: Single-walled carbon nanotube exposure induces membrane rearrangement and suppression of receptor-mediated signalling pathways in model mast cells. Toxicology Letters, 2014;229(1):198-209. Toxicology Letters can be contacted at: Elsevier Ireland Ltd, Elsevier House, Brookvale Plaza, East Park Shannon, Co, Clare, 00000, Ireland. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Toxicology Letters - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/505519)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from E.Y. Umemoto, University of Hawaii, John A Burns Sch Med, Dept. of Cell & Mol Biol, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States. Additional authors for this research include M. Speck, L.M.N. Shimoda, K. Kahue, C. Sung, A.J. Stokes and H. Turner (see also Immune System).

Keywords for this news article include: Honolulu, Hawaii, United States, North and Central America, Emerging Technologies, Immune System, Mast Cells, Nanotechnology, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Health & Medicine Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters