News Column

Study Findings on Cancer Gene Therapy Are Outlined in Reports from Karolinska Institute (Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated miRNAs in...

September 8, 2014



Study Findings on Cancer Gene Therapy Are Outlined in Reports from Karolinska Institute (Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with highlight on the miR-200 family: Prognostic value and prospective role in ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Gene Therapy Week -- New research on Biotechnology is the subject of a report. According to news originating from Stockholm, Sweden, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short ribonucleic acids found to play a pivotal role in cancer pathogenesis. MiRNAs are crucial in cellular differentiation, growth, stress response, cell death and other fundamental cellular processes, and their involvement in ovarian cancer has been recently shown."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Karolinska Institute, "They can repress the expression of important cancer-related genes and they can also function both as oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. During epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive properties. In the ovarian surface epithelium, EMT is considered the key regulator of the post-ovulatory repair process and it can be triggered by a range of environmental stimuli. The aberrant expression of the miR-200 family (miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-141 and miR-429) in ovarian carcinoma and its involvement in ovarian cancer initiation and progression has been well-demonstrated. The miR-200 family members seem to be strongly associated with a pathologic EMT and to have a metastasis suppressive role. MiRNA signatures can accurately distinguish ovarian cancer from the normal ovary and can be used as diagnostic tools to predict the clinical response to chemotherapy. Recent evidence suggests a growing list of new miRNAs (miR-187, miR-34a, miR-506, miRNA-138, miR-30c, miR-30d, miR-30e-3p, miR-370 and miR-106a, among others) that are also implicated in ovarian carcinoma-associated EMT, either enhancing or suppressing it. MiRNA-based gene therapy provides a prospective anti-tumour approach for integrated cancer therapy."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The aim of nanotechnology-based delivery approach for miRNA therapy is to overcome challenges in miRNA delivery and to effectively encourage the reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer cells, which may lead to a clinically translatable miRNA-based therapy to benefit ovarian cancer patients."

For more information on this research see: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with highlight on the miR-200 family: Prognostic value and prospective role in ovarian cancer therapeutics. Cancer Letters, 2014;351(2):173-181. Cancer Letters can be contacted at: Elsevier Ireland Ltd, Elsevier House, Brookvale Plaza, East Park Shannon, Co, Clare, 00000, Ireland. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Cancer Letters - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/506050)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from M. Koutsaki, Karolinska Inst, Dept. of Lab Med, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden. Additional authors for this research include D.A. Spandidos and A. Zaravinos (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Stockholm, Sweden, Europe, Biotechnology, Cancer Gene Therapy, Carcinoma, Genetics, Gynecology, Oncology, Ovarian Cancer, Women's Health

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Cancer Gene Therapy Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters