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Researchers' Work from University of Cairo Focuses on Lung Cancer (Photodynamic ability of silver nanoparticles in inducing cytotoxic effects in...

September 9, 2014



Researchers' Work from University of Cairo Focuses on Lung Cancer (Photodynamic ability of silver nanoparticles in inducing cytotoxic effects in breast and lung cancer cell lines)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Data detailed on Oncology have been presented. According to news reporting originating from Giza, Egypt, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Cancer is still a major health problem, and the use of nanomedicine for cancer treatment has become a new focus area for research. The multifunctional effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these nanostructures potent compounds for biomedical applications."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Cairo, "AgNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy for their size, shape, and cellular localization; ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy for absorption properties; and their zeta potential for determining their surface charge. Cytotoxicity effects on both MCF-7 breast and A549 lung cancer cell lines were assessed using inverted light microscopy, Trypan blue exclusion assay, adenosine triphosphate luminescence, and lactate dehydrogenase membrane integrity assays. The cell death mechanism was determined by Annexin V and propidium iodide flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that AgNPs used during the present study were found to be of spherical shape, with -0.0261 mV surface net charges, with an average size of 27 nm, and they were positively identified in both cell lines. Irradiated AgNPs promoted decreased viability and proliferation, increased cytotoxicity, and induced programmed cell death through apoptosis. AgNPs exhibited photodynamic activity in both cancer cell lines, but MCF-7 cells showed enhanced cytotoxic effects over the A549 cells. The novelty related to the study presented is twofold: while the maximum absorbance of most AgNPs lies in the wavelength region of 370-450 nm, the AgNPs produced and used in this research have a peak absorption at 631 nm that is of great significance, since this wavelength lies within the biological therapeutic window."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This work clearly demonstrates that our AgNPs activated at 635 nm contribute significantly to the cytotoxicity induced in cancer cells, but more so in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) than in lung cancer cells (A549)."

For more information on this research see: Photodynamic ability of silver nanoparticles in inducing cytotoxic effects in breast and lung cancer cell lines. International Journal of Nanomedicine, 2014;9():3771-3780. International Journal of Nanomedicine can be contacted at: Dove Medical Press Ltd, PO Box 300-008, Albany, Auckland 0752, New Zealand (see also Oncology).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting I. Mfouo-Tynga, Cairo University, Natl Inst Laser Enhanced Sci, Giza, Egypt. Additional authors for this research include A. El-Hussein, M. Abdel-Harith and H. Abrahamse.

Keywords for this news article include: Giza, Egypt, Africa, Emerging Technologies, Lung Cancer, Lung Neoplasms, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Oncology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Weekly


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