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Researchers from University of Waterloo Describe Findings in Cancer Therapy (Immuno- and hemocompatibility of amino acid pairing peptides for...

September 10, 2014



Researchers from University of Waterloo Describe Findings in Cancer Therapy (Immuno- and hemocompatibility of amino acid pairing peptides for potential use in anticancer drug delivery)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on Oncology are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Waterloo, Canada, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Amino acid pairing peptide-based nanoparticles were recently introduced as promising carriers for hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The AC8 peptide, n-FEFQFNFK-c, is based on the amino acid pairing (AAP) design with 8 amino acids and hence the designated name AAP8."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Waterloo, "The nanoparticles (NPs) AAP8 have modified either on the C-terminal or on both terminal, by conjugation with diethylene glycol (DEG). Here, the in vitro biocompatibilities of the NPs and their modified versions were compared and the potential of these NPs as carriers for the hydrophobic anticancer drug pirarubicin was determined as well as the peptide-drug co-assembly complexes. The toxicity of the NPs, DEGylated NPs, and blended mixtures with pirarubicin, was tested against the human adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell line, A549. The amino-end DEGylated NP, (NP-I), had superior biocompatibility over the non-modified NPs or double DEGylated NPs (NP-II). NP-I had very low hemolytic activity (1%) while NP and NP-II had marginal (8%) and acceptable (5%) hemolytic activity, respectively. All three types of NPs did not activate the complement system via the classical and alternative pathways nor did they activate the anaphylotoxin C3a. However, NP-II and its drug complex effectively activate the complement terminal attack complex. The lectin pathway was not activated by NP-I and NP-II, but was to a small extent by the non-modified NPs, with no lectin activation when complexed with drug."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These results indicate NP-I is the most promising peptide for use as a drug delivery system, highlighting the importance of proper modification in peptides for drug delivery systems."

For more information on this research see: Immuno- and hemocompatibility of amino acid pairing peptides for potential use in anticancer drug delivery. Journal of Bioactive and Compatible Polymers, 2014;29(3):254-269. Journal of Bioactive and Compatible Polymers can be contacted at: Sage Publications Ltd, 1 Olivers Yard, 55 City Road, London EC1Y 1SP, England. (Sage Publications - www.sagepub.com/; Journal of Bioactive and Compatible Polymers - jbc.sagepub.com)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Naahidi, University of Waterloo, Dept. of Biol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. Additional authors for this research include M. Jafari, M. Logan, F. Edalat, A. Khademhosseini, B. Dixon and P. Chen (see also Oncology).

Keywords for this news article include: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, North and Central America, Amino Acids, Drug Delivery Systems, Emerging Technologies, Hematology, Hemolytic, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Oncology, Peptides, Proteins, Therapy

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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