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Researchers from School of Physical Detail Findings in Silicon (A Variable Response Phosphine Sensing Matrix Based on Nanostructure Treated p and...

September 10, 2014



Researchers from School of Physical Detail Findings in Silicon (A Variable Response Phosphine Sensing Matrix Based on Nanostructure Treated p and n-type Porous Silicon Interfaces)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Electronics Newsweekly -- A new study on Silicon is now available. According to news reporting out of Atlanta, Georgia, by VerticalNews editors, research stated, "We study the dynamic interplay as PH3 interacts at room temperature to contribute electrons to nanostructure modified p and n-type porous silicon (PS) interfaces. A nanopore coated microporous interface is treated to form TiO2, SnOx, CuxO, and AuxO (x >> 1) nanostructured centers deposited in fractional coverage on the PS interface."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the School of Physical, "Relative sensitivities of the surface sites are measured under 2-5 and 10 ppm PH3 exposure. The interaction with two p-type nanostructure decorated boron-doped interfaces demonstrates enhancement of sensitivity relative to undecorated PS. The results are explained using the inverse hard/soft acid/base (IHSAB) principle, combining the tenants of acid/base chemistry and semiconductor physics. Analyte coupling to the majority charge carriers of the extrinsic semiconductor determines the nature of directed electron transduction as it induces a change in conductance. As applied, the nanostructured metal oxides serve as gateways, forcing a dominant electron transduction (versus chemisorption) at the decorated extrinsic semiconductor interface. A study of gold clustered oxide depositions on p-type (1-3 Omega-cm) PS demonstrates that an optimal fractional deposition can be attained and should not be exceeded to avoid crosstalk between the deposited nanoparticles. It appears that phosphine can be converted on interaction with phosphorous doped n-type PS."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "A reversal of the response signal observed with increased PH3 concentration, considered within the IHSAB model, suggests that the conductance might be associated with the formation of the electron withdrawing PH2 radical."

For more information on this research see: A Variable Response Phosphine Sensing Matrix Based on Nanostructure Treated p and n-type Porous Silicon Interfaces. IEEE Sensors Journal, 2014;14(8):40-47. IEEE Sensors Journal can be contacted at: Ieee-Inst Electrical Electronics Engineers Inc, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08855-4141, USA. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - www.ieee.org/; IEEE Sensors Journal - ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7361)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.L. Gole, Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Atlanta, Georgia, United States, North and Central America, Electronics, Emerging Technologies, Nanotechnology, Organophosphorus Compounds, Phosphines, Phosphorus Compounds, Porous Silicon, Semiconductor

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Electronics Newsweekly


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