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Reports Outline Cancer Therapy Study Results from University of North Carolina (Lipid-coated Cisplatin nanoparticles induce neighboring effect and...

September 10, 2014



Reports Outline Cancer Therapy Study Results from University of North Carolina (Lipid-coated Cisplatin nanoparticles induce neighboring effect and exhibit enhanced anticancer efficacy)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Oncology have been published. According to news reporting from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP) into nanoparticles (NPs) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency has been difficult due to the poor solubility of CDDP. However, this barrier has been overcome with a reverse microemulsion method appropriating CDDP's poor solubility to our advantage promoting the synthesis of a pure cisplatin nanoparticle with a high drug loading capacity (approximately 80.8 wt %)."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of North Carolina, "Actively targeted CDDP NPs exhibited significant accumulation in human A375M melanoma tumor cells in vivo. In addition, CDDP NPs achieved potent antitumor efficacy through the neighboring effect at a dose of 1 mg/kg when injected weekly via iv without inducing nephrotoxicity. The neighboring effect regards an observation made in vivo when the tumor cells that took up CDDP NPs released active drug following apoptosis. Via diffusion, surrounding cells that were previously unaffected showed intake of the released drug and their apoptosis soon followed. This observation was also made in vitro when A375M melanoma tumor cells incubated with CDDP NPs exhibited release of active drug and induced apoptosis on untreated neighboring cells. However, the neighboring effect was unique to rapidly proliferating tumor cells. Liver functional parameters and H&E staining of liver tissue in vivo failed to detect any difference between CDDP NP treated and control groups in terms of tissue health."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "By simultaneously promoting an increase in cytotoxicity and a lesser degree of side effects over free CDDP, CDDP NPs show great therapeutic potential with lower doses of drug while enhancing anticancer effectiveness."

For more information on this research see: Lipid-coated Cisplatin nanoparticles induce neighboring effect and exhibit enhanced anticancer efficacy. Acs Nano, 2013;7(11):9896-904. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Acs Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Guo, Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States. Additional authors for this research include Y. Wang, L. Miao, Z. Xu, C.M. Lin, Y. Zhang and L. Huang (see also Oncology).

Keywords for this news article include: Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States, North and Central America, Emerging Technologies, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Oncology, Therapy.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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