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New Kallikreins Study Results from School of Medicine Described (Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen by Using...

September 9, 2014



New Kallikreins Study Results from School of Medicine Described (Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen by Using Antibodies Anchored on a DNA Nanostructural Scaffold)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Enzymes and Coenzymes. According to news reporting originating from Zhejiang, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The high occurrence of prostate cancer in men makes the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test really important. More importantly, the recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy is high, whereas the traditional P SA immunoassay does not possess the sufficient high sensitivity for post-treatment PSA detection."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the School of Medicine, "In these assays, uncontrolled and random orientation of capture antibodies on the surface largely reduces their activity. Here, by exploiting the rapidly emerging DNA nanotechnology, we developed a DNA nanostructure based scaffold to precisely control the assembly of antibody monolayer. We demonstrated that the detection sensitivity was critically dependent on the nanoscale-spacing (nanospacing) of immobilized antibodies. In addition to the controlled assembly, we further amplified the sensing signal by using the gold nanoparticles, resulting in extremely high sensitivity and a low detection limit of 1 pg/mL."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "To test the real-world applicability of our nanoengineered electrochemical sensor, we evaluated the performance with 11 patients' serum samples and obtained consistent results with the 'gold-standard' assays."

For more information on this research see: Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen by Using Antibodies Anchored on a DNA Nanostructural Scaffold. Analytical Chemistry, 2014;86(15):7337-7342. Analytical Chemistry can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Analytical Chemistry - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancham)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X.Q. Chen, Wenzhou Med Univ, Sch Med Lab Sci & Life Sci, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include G.B. Zhou, P. Song, J.J. Wang, J.M. Gao, J.X. Lu, C.H. Fan and X.L. Zuo (see also Enzymes and Coenzymes).

Keywords for this news article include: Zhejiang, People's Republic of China, Asia, Antibodies, Biological Tumor Markers, Blood Proteins, Chemicals, Chemistry, DNA Research, Electrochemical, Emerging Technologies, Endopeptidases, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Immunoglobulins, Immunology, Kallikreins, Nanostructural, Nanostructures, Nanotechnology, Neoplasm Antigens, Peptide Hydrolases, Prostate-Specific Antigen, Prostatic Secretory Proteins, Serine Proteases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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