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New Essential Amino Acids Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at University of Washington (Biofabrication of ZnS:Mn luminescent...

September 9, 2014



New Essential Amino Acids Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at University of Washington (Biofabrication of ZnS:Mn luminescent nanocrystals using histidine, hexahistidine, and His-tagged proteins: A comparison study)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Essential Amino Acids. According to news reporting originating in Seattle, Washington, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The ubiquitous hexahistidine purification tag has been used to conjugate proteins to the shell of CdSe:ZnS quantum dots (QDs) due to its affinity for surface-exposed Zn2+ ions but little attention has been paid to the potential of His-tagged proteins for mineralizing luminescent ZnS nanocrystals."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Washington, "Here, we compare the ability of free histidine, a His tag peptide, His-tagged thioredoxin (TrxA, a monomeric protein), and N- and C-terminally His-tagged versions of Hsp31 (a homodimeric protein) to support the synthesis of Mn-doped ZnS nanocrystals from aqueous precursors under mild conditions of pH (8.2) and temperature (37 degrees C). We find that: (1) it is possible to produce poor quality QDs when histidine is used at high (8 mM) concentration; (2) an increase in local histidine concentration through repetition of the amino acid as a His tag decreases the amount of needed reagent approximate to 10-fold and improves optical properties; (3) fusion of the same His tag to TrxA allows for ZnS:Mn QDs mineralization at micromolar concentrations; and (4) doubling the local hexahistidine concentration by exploiting Hsp31 dimerization further improves nanocrystal luminescence with the brightest particles obtained when His tags are spatially co-localized at the Hsp31 N-termini."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Although hexahistidine tracts are not as efficient as combinatorially selected ZnS binding peptides at QD synthesis, it should be possible to use the large number of available His-tagged proteins and the synthesis approach described herein to produce luminescent nanoparticles whose protein shell carries a broad range of functions."

For more information on this research see: Biofabrication of ZnS:Mn luminescent nanocrystals using histidine, hexahistidine, and His-tagged proteins: A comparison study. Biochemical Engineering Journal, 2014;89():28-32. Biochemical Engineering Journal can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biochemical Engineering Journal - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/600804)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W.B. Zhou, University of Washington, Dept. of Chem Engn, Seattle, WA 98195, United States (see also Essential Amino Acids).

Keywords for this news article include: Seattle, Washington, United States, North and Central America, Cyclic Amino Acids, Emerging Technologies, Essential Amino Acids, Histidine, Nanocrystal, Nanotechnology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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