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New Data from Aarhus University Illuminate Findings in Biosensing (Electrophoretic sensitivity control applied on microscale NOx- biosensors with...

September 10, 2014



New Data from Aarhus University Illuminate Findings in Biosensing (Electrophoretic sensitivity control applied on microscale NOx- biosensors with different membrane permeabilities)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Biosensing are presented in a new report. According to news reporting out of Aarhus, Denmark, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The entry of ions into biosensors equipped with porous membranes can be enhanced or lowered by migration in an electrical field. We here report how this so called Electrophoretic Sensitivity Control (ESC) technique operates with microscale NO (i.e., NO2- + NO3-) biosensors constructed with more and less permeable membranes when exposed to waters of different salinity."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Aarhus University, "The sensors were calibrated at ESC potentials of -0.2 to +0.6V and at salinities of 0.1, 5 and 35 gNaCl L-1. Our data show that decreasing the membrane permeability allows for a higher ESC response and therefore for a better scaling of the sensor sensitivity. An ESC polarization of +0.2 V was enough to fully compensate for the initial loss in NO3- sensitivity due to the reduced permeability in the less permeable membrane as compared to a highly permeable membrane with no ESC circuit applied at salinities of 0.1 and 5 g L-1. At 35 g L-1 the compensation occurred at +0.4 V, but only for sensors with a thin membrane."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "In addition to increased possibility of scaling the response of the biosensor, a reduction in permeability allowed for rapid in situ zero-calibration of the sensor and also in more robust membranes with increased adhesion."

For more information on this research see: Electrophoretic sensitivity control applied on microscale NOx- biosensors with different membrane permeabilities. Sensors and Actuators B-Chemical, 2014;202():307-313. Sensors and Actuators B-Chemical can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Sa, PO Box 564, 1001 Lausanne, Switzerland (see also Biosensing).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting U. Marzocchi, Aarhus University, Aarhus Inst Adv Studies, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.

Keywords for this news article include: Aarhus, Denmark, Europe, Bioengineering, Bionanotechnology, Biosensing, Biotechnology, Nanobiotechnology, Nanotechnology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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