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New Applied microbiology and biotechnology Findings from University of Shizuoka Described [Expression and purification of cyto-insectotoxin (Cit1a)...

September 10, 2014



New Applied microbiology and biotechnology Findings from University of Shizuoka Described [Expression and purification of cyto-insectotoxin (Cit1a) using silkworm larvae targeting for an antimicrobial therapeutic agent]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Researchers detail new data in Biotechnology. According to news originating from Shizuoka, Japan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), both synthetic and from natural sources, have raised interest recently as potential alternatives to antibiotics. Cyto-insectotoxin (Cit1a) is a 69-amino-acid antimicrobial peptide isolated from the venom of the central Asian spider Lachesana tarabaevi."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Shizuoka, "The synthetic gene Cit1a fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was expressed as the EGFP-Cit1a fusion protein using a cysteine protease-deleted Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV-CP-) bacmid in silkworm larva and pupa. The antimicrobial effect of the purified protein was assayed using disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The minimum inhibitory concentration of EGFP-Cit1a was also measured against several bacterial strains and showed similar antimicrobial activity to that of the synthetic Cit1a reported earlier. The EGFP-Cit1a fusion protein showed antibiotic activity toward gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at the micromolar concentration level. These results show that active Cit1a can be produced and purified in silkworm, although this peptide is insecticidal."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This study demonstrates the potential of active Cit1a purified from silkworms to use as an antimicrobial agent."

For more information on this research see: Expression and purification of cyto-insectotoxin (Cit1a) using silkworm larvae targeting for an antimicrobial therapeutic agent. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2014;98(16):6973-6982. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring St, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/0175-7598/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from M.P. Ali, Shizuoka Univ, Res Inst Green Sci & Technol, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka 4228529, Japan. Additional authors for this research include K. Yoshimatsu, T. Suzuki, T. Kato and E.Y. Park (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Shizuoka, Japan, Asia, Biotechnology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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