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Investigators from Third Military Medical University Release New Data on Cancer Gene Therapy (E2F1 acts as a negative feedback regulator of...

September 8, 2014



Investigators from Third Military Medical University Release New Data on Cancer Gene Therapy (E2F1 acts as a negative feedback regulator of c-Myc-induced hTERT transcription during tumorigenesis)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Gene Therapy Week -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news originating from Chongqing, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Since induction of hTERT expression and subsequent telomerase activation play a critical role in the multistep process of tumorigenesis, a better understanding of hTERT regulation may provide not only a rationale for the molecular basis of cancer progression but also a path to the development of cancer prevention. The c-Myc oncoprotein can function effectively in activating the transcriptional expression of hTERT through E-box elements on its promoter."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Third Military Medical University, "E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) was found to be a repressor of hTERT transcription by directly binding to its promoter, thereby inhibiting hTERT protein expression. For the extensively crosstalk between c-Myc and E2F1 signals, which is now known to be vital to cell fate, we speculated that E2F1 may play a negative regulatory role in c-Myc-induced hTERT transcription. In the present study, we chose to use human embryonic fibroblast cells as an experimental model system, and present evidence that the E2F1 transcription factor constitutes a negative regulatory system to limit c-Myc transcriptional activation of hTERT in normal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that upregulation of the miR-17-92 cluster (miR-20a/miR-17-5p) is involved in the regulation of E2F1-mediated negative feedback of the c-Myc/hTERT pathway."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Our results not only reveal novel insights into how normal cells control the transmission of c-Myc-mediated oncogenic signals, but also further establish E2F1 as an important molecular target for cancer therapy."

For more information on this research see: E2F1 acts as a negative feedback regulator of c-Myc-induced hTERT transcription during tumorigenesis. Oncology Reports, 2014;32(3):1273-1280. Oncology Reports can be contacted at: Spandidos Publ Ltd, Pob 18179, Athens, 116 10, Greece (see also Biotechnology).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from Y.F. Zhang, Third Military Medical University, Xinqiao Hosp, Dept. of Gastroenterol, Chongqing, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include A.R. Zhang, C.F. Shen, B.C. Zhang, Z.G. Rao, R.Q. Wang, S.M. Yang, S.B. Ning, G.P. Mao and D.C. Fang.

Keywords for this news article include: Chongqing, People's Republic of China, Asia, Biotechnology, Cancer Gene Therapy, Oncology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Gene Therapy Week


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