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Findings from University of Munster Broaden Understanding of Nanoparticles (Comparative two- and three-dimensional analysis of nanoparticle...

September 9, 2014



Findings from University of Munster Broaden Understanding of Nanoparticles (Comparative two- and three-dimensional analysis of nanoparticle localization in different cell types by Raman spectroscopic imaging)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Nanoparticles is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Munster, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The increasing production and application of engineered nanomaterials requires a detailed understanding of the potential toxicity of nanoparticles and their uptake in living cells and tissue. For that purpose, a highly sensitive and selective method for detecting single nonlabeled nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerations in cells and animal tissue is required."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Munster, "Here, we show that Raman microspectroscopy allows for the specific detection of TiO2 nanoparticles inside cultured NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The spatial position of TiO2 nanoparticles and in parallel the relative intracellular concentration and distribution of cellular constituents such as proteins or DNA residues were identified and displayed by construction of two- and three-dimensional Raman maps. The resulting Raman images reflected the significant differences in nanoparticle uptake and intracellular storage of fibroblasts and macrophages. Furthermore, TiO2 nanomaterials could be characterized and the presence of rutile- and anatase-phase TiO2 were determined inside cells. Together, the data shown here prove that Raman spectroscopic imaging is a promising technique for studying the interaction of nanomaterials with living cells and for differentiating intracellular nanoparticles from those localized on the cell membrane."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The technology provides a label-free, non-destructive, material-specific analysis of whole cells with high spatial resolution, along with additional information on the current status of the material properties."

For more information on this research see: Comparative two- and three-dimensional analysis of nanoparticle localization in different cell types by Raman spectroscopic imaging. Journal of Molecular Structure, 2014;1073():44-50. Journal of Molecular Structure can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Molecular Structure - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/500850)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K. Brautigam, University of Munster, Biomed Center Technol, D-48149 Munster, Germany. Additional authors for this research include T. Bocklitz, A. Silge, C. Dierker, R. Ossig, J. Schnekenburger, D. Cialla, P. Rosch and J. Popp (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Munster, Germany, Europe, Emerging Technologies, Nanomaterial, Nanoparticle, Nanoparticles, Nanotechnology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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