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Findings from University of Bonn in the Area of Botany Reported (Fatty acid synthesis and lipid metabolism in the obligate biotrophic fungus...

September 9, 2014



Findings from University of Bonn in the Area of Botany Reported (Fatty acid synthesis and lipid metabolism in the obligate biotrophic fungus Rhizophagus irregularis during mycorrhization of Lotus japonicus)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Life Science Research have been presented. According to news originating from Bonn, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation with fungi of the Glomeromycota represents a widespread symbiotic interaction of vascular plants. Different signaling events and metabolic adaptations are required for the close interaction between the two partners."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Bonn, "Membrane lipid synthesis is a prerequisite for symbiosis, and membrane properties depend on lipid composition. Lipid profiling was performed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to study the role of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, phospholipids, galactolipids, sterols and sphingolipids during the colonization of Lotus japonicus roots with Rhizophagus irregularis (syn. Glomus intraradices). Mycorrhization leads to an increased phosphate supply and suppresses the increase in galactolipids commonly observed in phosphate-deprived plants. In addition to free sterols and sterol esters, R. irregularis contains sterol glucosides and acylated sterol glucosides. Glycosylated sphingolipids (glucosylceramide, dihexosylceramide) and inositolphosphorylceramide were detected in the fungus. Lysophosphatidylcholine, a lipid previously implicated in mycorrhiza signaling, is present in low amounts in mock-infected and mycorrhized roots. The composition of fungal phospholipids changes after mycorrhization because molecular species with palmitvaccenic (di-16:1) or tetracosenoic (24: 1) acyl groups decrease in intraradical mycelium. This adaptation of lipid metabolism during intraradical growth is likely a prerequisite for symbiosis, achieving functional compatibility between the fungal and the periarbuscular membrane. Data mining in genomic and transcript databases revealed the presence of genes encoding enzymes of lipid biosynthesis in R. irregularis."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "However, no gene encoding multidomain fatty acid de novo synthase was detected in the genome sequence of this obligate biotrophic fungus."

For more information on this research see: Fatty acid synthesis and lipid metabolism in the obligate biotrophic fungus Rhizophagus irregularis during mycorrhization of Lotus japonicus. Plant Journal, 2014;79(3):398-412. Plant Journal can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Plant Journal - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-313X)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from V. Wewer, University of Bonn, Inst Mol Physiol & Biotechnol Plants IMBIO, D-53115 Bonn, Germany. Additional authors for this research include M. Brands and P. Dormann (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Bonn, Germany, Europe, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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