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Studies from Michigan Technological University Further Understanding of Chalcogens (Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution over Supported Small Amorphous...

August 15, 2014



Studies from Michigan Technological University Further Understanding of Chalcogens (Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution over Supported Small Amorphous Ni-Fe Nanoparticles in Alkaline Electrolyte)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- New research on Chalcogens is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Houghton, Michigan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a critical anode reaction often coupled with electron or photoelectron CO2 reduction and H-2 evolution reactions at the cathode for renewable energy conversion and storage. However, the sluggish OER kinetics and the utilization of precious metal catalysts are key obstacles in the broad deployment of these energy technologies."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Michigan Technological University, "Herein, inexpensive supported 4 nm Ni-Fe nanoparticles (NiyFe1-yOx/C) featuring amorphous structures have been prepared via a solution-phase nanocapsule method for active and durable OER electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolyte. The Ni-Fe nanopartide catalyst containing 31% Fe (Ni0.69Fe0.31Ox/C) shows the highest activity, exhibiting a 280 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm(-2) (equivalent to 10% efficiency of solar-to-fuel conversion) and a Tafel slope of 30 mV dec(-1) in 1.0 M KOH solution. The achieved OER activity outperforms NiOx/C and commercial Ir/C catalysts and is close to the highest performance of crystalline Ni-Fe thin films reported in the literature. In addition, a Faradaic efficiency of 97% measured on Ni0.69Fe0.31Ox/C suggests that carbon support corrosion and further oxidation of nanoparticle catalysts are negligible during the electrocatalytic OER tests. Ni0.69Fe0.31Ox/C further demonstrates high stability as there is no apparent OER activity loss (based on a chronoamperometry test) or particle aggregation (based on TEM image observation) after a 6 h anodization test."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The high efficiency and durability make these supported amorphous Ni-Fe nanoparticles potentially applicable in the (photo)electrochemical cells for water splitting to make H-2 fuel or CO2 reduction to produce usable fuels and chemicals."

For more information on this research see: Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution over Supported Small Amorphous Ni-Fe Nanoparticles in Alkaline Electrolyte. Langmuir, 2014;30(26):7893-7901. Langmuir can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Langmuir - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/langd5)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Qiu, Michigan Technological University, Dept. of Chem Engn, Houghton, MI 49931, United States. Additional authors for this research include L. Xin and W.Z. Li (see also Chalcogens).

Keywords for this news article include: Houghton, Michigan, Chalcogens, Electrolytes, Nanoparticle, United States, Nanotechnology, Inorganic Chemicals, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Science Letter


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