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Findings from Stanford University Broaden Understanding of General Science (Ultrafast fluorescence imaging in vivo with conjugated polymer...

August 15, 2014



Findings from Stanford University Broaden Understanding of General Science (Ultrafast fluorescence imaging in vivo with conjugated polymer fluorophores in the second near-infrared window)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Investigators publish new report on Science. According to news reporting out of Stanford, California, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "In vivo fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (1.0-1.7 mu m) can afford deep tissue penetration and high spatial resolution, owing to the reduced scattering of long-wavelength photons. Here we synthesize a series of low-bandgap donor/acceptor copolymers with tunable emission wavelengths of 1,050-1,350 nm in this window."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Stanford University, "Non-covalent functionalization with phospholipid-polyethylene glycol results in water-soluble and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles, allowing for live cell molecular imaging at >1,000 nm with polymer fluorophores for the first time. Importantly, the high quantum yield of the polymer allows for in vivo, deep-tissue and ultrafast imaging of mouse arterial blood flow with an unprecedented frame rate of >25 frames per second."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The high time-resolution results in spatially and time resolved imaging of the blood flow pattern in cardiogram waveform over a single cardiac cycle (similar to 200 ms) of a mouse, which has not been observed with fluorescence imaging in this window before."

For more information on this research see: Ultrafast fluorescence imaging in vivo with conjugated polymer fluorophores in the second near-infrared window. Nature Communications, 2014;5():10-18. Nature Communications can be contacted at: Nature Publishing Group, Macmillan Building, 4 Crinan St, London N1 9XW, England. (Nature Publishing Group - www.nature.com/; Nature Communications - www.nature.com/ncomms/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting G.S. Hong, Stanford University, Sch Med, Bio X Program, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Additional authors for this research include Y.P. Zou, A.L. Antaris, S. Diao, D. Wu, K. Cheng, X.D. Zhang, C.X. Chen, B. Liu, Y.H. He, J.Z. Wu, J. Yuan, B. Zhang, Z.M. Tao, C. Fukunaga and H.J. Dai (see also Science).

Keywords for this news article include: Science, Stanford, California, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Science Letter


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