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Study Data from University of Pennsylvania Update Understanding of Nanoparticles (Inorganic nanocrystals as contrast agents in MRI: synthesis,...

August 13, 2014



Study Data from University of Pennsylvania Update Understanding of Nanoparticles (Inorganic nanocrystals as contrast agents in MRI: synthesis, coating and introduction of multifunctionality)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Nanoparticles. According to news reporting originating from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Inorganic nanocrystals have myriad applications in medicine, including their use as drug or gene delivery complexes, therapeutic hyperthermia agents, in diagnostic systems and as contrast agents in a wide range of medical imaging techniques. In MRI, nanocrystals can produce contrast themselves, with iron oxides having been the most extensively explored, or can be given a coating that generates MR contrast, for example gold nanoparticles coated with gadolinium chelates."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Pennsylvania, "These MR-active nanocrystals can be used for imaging of the vasculature, liver and other organs, as well as molecular imaging, cell tracking and theranostics. As a result of these exciting applications, the synthesis and rendering of these nanocrystals as water soluble and biocompatible are therefore highly desirable. We discuss aqueous phase and organic phase methods for the synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals, such as gold, iron oxides and quantum dots. The pros and cons of the various methods are highlighted. We explore various methods for making nanocrystals biocompatible, i.e. direct synthesis of nanocrystals coated with biocompatible coatings, ligand substitution, amphiphile coating and embedding in carrier matrices that can be made biocompatible. Various examples are highlighted and their applications explained. These examples signify that the synthesis of biocompatible nanocrystals with controlled properties has been achieved by numerous research groups and can be applied to a wide range of applications."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Therefore, we expect to see reports of preclinical applications of ever more complex MRI-active nanoparticles and their wider exploitation, as well as in novel clinical settings."

For more information on this research see: Inorganic nanocrystals as contrast agents in MRI: synthesis, coating and introduction of multifunctionality. Nmr In Biomedicine, 2013;26(7):766-80. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Nmr In Biomedicine - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-1492)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D.P. Cormode, Radiology Department, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 1 Silverstein, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States. Additional authors for this research include B.L. Sanchez-Gaytan, A.J. Mieszawska, Z.A. Fayad and W.J Mulder (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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