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Researchers at University of North Carolina Describe Findings in Docetaxel Therapy (Plasma, tumor and tissue pharmacokinetics of Docetaxel delivered...

August 13, 2014



Researchers at University of North Carolina Describe Findings in Docetaxel Therapy (Plasma, tumor and tissue pharmacokinetics of Docetaxel delivered via nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Drugs and Therapies. According to news originating from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The particle fabrication technique PRINT® was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly(lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the chemotherapeutic Docetaxel. The pharmacokinetics of two cylindrical shaped particles with diameter=80nm; height=320nm (PRINT-Doc-80 x 320) and d=200nm; h=200nm (PRINT-Doc-200 x 200) were compared to Docetaxel in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 flank xenografts."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of North Carolina, "The Docetaxel plasma exposure was ~20-fold higher for both particles compared to docetaxel. Additionally, the volume of distribution (Vd) of Docetaxel in PRINT formulations was ~18-fold (PRINT-Doc-80 x 320) and ~33-fold (PRINT-Doc-200 x 200) lower than Docetaxel. The prolonged duration of Docetaxel in plasma when dosed with PRINT formulations subsequently led to increased tumor exposure of Docetaxel from 0 to 168h (~53% higher for PRINT-Doc-80 x 320 and ~76% higher for PRINT-Doc-200 x 200 particles). PRINT-Doc-80 x 320 had lower exposures in the liver, spleen and lung compared with PRINT-Doc-200 x 200. Thus, the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. In this study, the plasma, tumor, and tissue pharmacokinetics of different Docetaxel nanoparticles of precise shape and size were characterized in mice with human ovarian carcinoma xenograft."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "It is concluded that the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system."

For more information on this research see: Plasma, tumor and tissue pharmacokinetics of Docetaxel delivered via nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenograft. Nanomedicine, 2013;9(5):686-93. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Nanomedicine - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/703416)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from K.S. Chu, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, United States. Additional authors for this research include W. Hasan, S. Rawal, M.D. Walsh, E.M. Enlow, J.C. Luft, A.S. Bridges, J.L. Kuijer, M.E. Napier, W.C. Zamboni and J.M DeSimone (see also Drugs and Therapies).

Keywords for this news article include: Antineoplastics, Pharmaceuticals, Oncology, Carcinoma, Docetaxel, Immunology, Phagocytes, Chapel Hill, Nanoparticle, United States, Immune System, North Carolina, Nanotechnology, Pharmacokinetics, Mitotic Inhibitors, Drugs and Therapies, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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