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Research Results from International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Update Knowledge of Life Science Research (Blood feeding and...

August 12, 2014



Research Results from International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Update Knowledge of Life Science Research (Blood feeding and Plasmodium infection alters the miRNome of Anopheles stephensi)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Life Science Research is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating in New Delhi, India, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Blood feeding is an integral process required for physiological functions and propagation of the malaria vector Anopheles. During blood feeding, presence of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium in the blood induces several host effector molecules including microRNAs which play important roles in the development and maturation of the parasite within the mosquito."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, "The present study was undertaken to elucidate the dynamic expression of miRNAs during gonotrophic cycle and parasite development in Anopheles stephensi. Using next generation sequencing technology, we identified 126 miRNAs of which 17 were novel miRNAs. The miRNAs were further validated by northern hybridization and cloning. Blood feeding and parasitized blood feeding in the mosquitoes revealed regulation of 13 and 16 miRNAs respectively. Expression profiling of these miRNAs revealed that significant miRNAs were down-regulated upon parasitized blood feeding with a repertoire of miRNAs showing stage specific up-regulation. Expression profiles of significantly modulated miRNAs were further validated by real time PCR. Target prediction of regulated miRNAs revealed overlapping targeting by different miRNAs. These targets included several metabolic pathways including metabolic, redox homeostasis and protein processing machinery components. Our analysis revealed tight regulation of specific miRNAs post blood feeding and parasite infection in An. stephensi. Such regulated expression suggests possible role of these miRNAs during gonotrophic cycle in mosquito. Another set of miRNAs were also significantly regulated at 42 h and 5 days post infection indicating parasite stage-specific role of host miRNAs."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This study will result in better understanding of the role of miRNAs during gonotrophic cycle and parasite development in mosquito and can probably facilitate in devising novel malaria control strategies at vector level."

For more information on this research see: Blood feeding and Plasmodium infection alters the miRNome of Anopheles stephensi. Plos One, 2014;9(5):e98402. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Jain, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India. Additional authors for this research include V. Rana, J. Shrinet, A. Sharma, A. Tridibes, S. Sunil and R.K Bhatnagar (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, India, New Delhi, Life Science Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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