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Research Conducted at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Has Updated Our Knowledge about Hematopoietic (Cyclophosphamide followed by intravenous...

August 13, 2014



Research Conducted at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Has Updated Our Knowledge about Hematopoietic (Cyclophosphamide followed by intravenous targeted busulfan for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: pharmacokinetics and ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Hematopoietic have been published. According to news reporting out of Seattle, Washington, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Targeted busulfan ((T)BU) and cyclophosphamide (CY) for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation carries a high risk of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) in patients undergoing transplantation for myelofibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that reversing the sequence of administration (from (T)BU/CY to CY/(T)BU) would reduce SOS and day +100 nonrelapse mortality."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, "We enrolled 51 patients with myelofibrosis (n=20), acute myelogenous leukemia (n=20), or myelodysplastic syndrome (n=11) in a prospective trial of CY/(T)BU conditioning for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. CY 60 mg/kg/day i.v. for 2 days was followed by daily i.v. BU for 4 days, targeted to a concentration at steady state (Css) of 800-900 ng/mL. Compared with (T)BU/CY-conditioned patients, CY/(T)BU-conditioned patients had greater exposure to CY (p <.0001) and less exposure to 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (p <.0001). Clinical outcomes were compared between cases and controls (n=271) conditioned with (T)BU/CY for the same indications. In patients with myelofibrosis, CY/(T)BU conditioning was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of SOS (0% versus 30% after (T)BU/CY; p=.006), whereas the incidence of SOS was low in both cohorts with acute myelogenous leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome. Day +100 mortality was significantly lower in the CY/(T)BU cohort (2% versus 13%; p=.01)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "CY/(T)BU conditioning had a marked affect on the pharmacokinetics of CY and was associated with significantly lower incidence of SOS and day +100 mortality, suggesting that CY/(T)BU is superior to (T)BU/CY as conditioning for patients with myelofibrosis."

For more information on this research see: Cyclophosphamide followed by intravenous targeted busulfan for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes. Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2013;19(7):1033-9. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/670590)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.R. Rezvani, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, WA, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.S. McCune, B.E. Storer, A. Batchelder, A. Kida, H.J. Deeg and G.B McDonald (see also Hematopoietic).

Keywords for this news article include: Antineoplastics, Pharmaceuticals, Drugs, Seattle, Surgery, Therapy, Washington, Hematology, Hydrocarbons, United States, Hematopoietic, Cyclophosphamide, Pharmacokinetics, Alkylating Agents, Mustard Compounds, Cell Transplantation, Phosphoramide Mustards, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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