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Reports on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders Findings from Vanderbilt University Provide New Insights (Genetic targeting of the amphetamine...

August 13, 2014



Reports on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders Findings from Vanderbilt University Provide New Insights (Genetic targeting of the amphetamine and methylphenidate-sensitive dopamine transporter: On the path to an animal model of ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders have been published. According to news reporting originating from Nashville, Tennessee, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Alterations in dopamine (DA) signaling underlie the most widely held theories of molecular and circuit level perturbations that lead to risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The DA transporter (DAT), a presynaptic reuptake protein whose activity provides critical support for DA signaling by limiting DA action at pre- and postsynaptic receptors, has been consistently associated with ADHD through pharmacological, behavioral, brain imaging and genetic studies."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Vanderbilt University, "Currently, the animal models of ADHD exhibit significant limitations, stemming in large part from their lack of construct validity. To remedy this situation, we have pursued the creation of a mouse model derived from a functional nonsynonymous variant in the DAT gene (SLC6A3) of ADHD probands. We trace our path from the identification of these variants to in vitro biochemical and physiological studies to the production of the DAT Val559 mouse model."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "We discuss our initial findings with these animals and their promise in the context of existing rodent models of ADHD."

For more information on this research see: Genetic targeting of the amphetamine and methylphenidate-sensitive dopamine transporter: On the path to an animal model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Neurochemistry International, 2014;73():56-70. Neurochemistry International can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Neurochemistry International - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/643)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.A. Mergy, Vanderbilt University, Sch Med, Dept. of Psychiat, Nashville, TN 37232, United States. Additional authors for this research include R. Gowrishankar, G.L. Davis, T.N. Jessen, J. Wright, G.D. Stanwood, M.K. Hahn and R.D. Blakely (see also Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders).

Keywords for this news article include: ADHD, Pharmaceuticals, Drugs, Therapy, Genetics, Nashville, Tennessee, Amphetamine, United States, Mental Health, Catecholamines, Biogenic Amines, Adrenergic Agent, Organic Chemicals, Dopamine Hydrochloride, North and Central America, Developmental Disabilities, Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitor, Central Nervous System Stimulants

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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