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Report Summarizes DNA Research Study Findings from University of Seoul (Comparative toxicity of silver nanoparticles on oxidative stress and DNA...

August 12, 2014



Report Summarizes DNA Research Study Findings from University of Seoul (Comparative toxicity of silver nanoparticles on oxidative stress and DNA damage in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on DNA Research have been published. According to news reporting originating in Seoul, South Korea, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "This study examined the effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) surface coating and size on the organismal and molecular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. The toxicity of bare AgNPs and Sand 38 nm PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP8-AgNPs, PVP38-AgNPs) were compared."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Seoul, "The toxicity of AgNO3 was also tested because ion dissolution and particle-specific effects are often important characteristics determining Ag nanotoxicity. Comparative toxicity across AgNO3 and the three different types of AgNPs was first evaluated using a C elegans mortality test by a direct comparison of the LC50 values. Subsequently, mutant screening followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial toxicity and DNA damage assays were carried out at equitoxic (LC10 and LC50) concentrations to further assess the toxicity mechanism of AgNO3 and AgNPs. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs had similar toxicities, whereas PVP coating reduced the toxicity of the AgNPs significantly. Of the PVP-AgNPs, the smaller NPs were more toxic. Different groups of mutants responded differently to AgNO3 and AgNPs, which indicates that their toxicity mechanism might be different. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs induced mitochondrial membrane damage. None of the silver materials tested caused detectable polymerase-inhibiting DNA lesions in either the nucleus or mitochondria as measured by a quantitative PCR assay, but AgNO3, bare AgNPs and PVP8-AgNPs induced oxidative DNA damage."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results show that coatings on the AgNPs surface and the particle size make a clear contribution to the toxicity of the AgNPs, and oxidative stress-related mitochondrial and DNA damage appear to be potential mechanisms of toxicity."

For more information on this research see: Comparative toxicity of silver nanoparticles on oxidative stress and DNA damage in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Chemosphere, 2014;108():343-352. Chemosphere can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Chemosphere - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/362)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.M. Ahn, Univ Seoul, Grad Sch Energy & Environm Syst Engn, Seoul 130743, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include H.J. Eom, X.Y. Yang, J.N. Meyer and J. Choi (see also DNA Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Seoul, Nematodes, DNA Damage, Proteomics, South Korea, DNA Research, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Deoxyribonucleic Acid, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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