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Recent Findings from University of Parma Has Provided New Information about Liposomes (Enhancement of the Uptake and Cytotoxic Activity of...

August 13, 2014



Recent Findings from University of Parma Has Provided New Information about Liposomes (Enhancement of the Uptake and Cytotoxic Activity of Doxorubicin in Cancer Cells by Novel cRGD-Semipeptide-Anchoring Liposomes)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- New research on Biotechnology is the subject of a report. According to news originating from Parma, Italy, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Novel liposemipeptides hanging cyclic azabicycloalkane-RGD or aminoproline-RGD terminals were synthesized and incorporated into liposomal nanoparticles cAba/cAmpRGD-LNP5 3C/3D. Liposomes with similar composition and lacking semipeptide conjugates were constructed for comparison (LNP, 3A), and physical encapsulation of the anticancer doxorubicin drug in both targeted and untargeted liposomes was accomplished."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Parma, "Microstructural analysis performed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) revealed that the conjugated nanoparticles presented an average size of 80 nm and were constituted by 5 nm thick unilamellar liposome bilayer. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy studies showed that 3C-DOXO and 3D-DOXO efficiently delivered the drug into the nuclei of both quiescent and proliferating cells even in a high serum concentration environment. The uptake of doxorubicin when carried by liposomes was faster than that of the free drug, and 30 min incubation was sufficient to load cell nuclei with doxorubicin. Targeted liposomes significantly induced cell death of human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells (IC50 = 144 nM, 3C-DOXO; IC50 = 274 nM, 3D-DOXO), about 2- to 6-fold more potent than free doxorubicin or 3A-DOXO controls (IC50 = 527 and 854 nM, respectively)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These results suggest that cAba/cAmpRGD liposomal nanoparticles hold promise for the rapid and efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to alpha(V)beta(3)-expressing tumor cells."

For more information on this research see: Enhancement of the Uptake and Cytotoxic Activity of Doxorubicin in Cancer Cells by Novel cRGD-Semipeptide-Anchoring Liposomes. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 2014;11(7):2280-2293. Molecular Pharmaceutics can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Molecular Pharmaceutics - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/mpohbp)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from L. Battistini, University of Parma, Dipartimento Med Clin & Sperimentale, I-43126 Parma, Italy. Additional authors for this research include P. Burreddu, A. Sartori, D. Arosio, L. Manzoni, L. Paduano, G. D'Errico, R. Sala, L. Reia, S. Bonomini, G. Rassu and F. Zanardi (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Antibiotics - Antineoplastics, Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, Parma, Italy, Europe, Cancer, Therapy, Oncology, Liposomes, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Cytotoxic Activity, Drug Delivery Systems, Emerging Technologies, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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