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New Findings on Heart Bypass Surgery Discussed by Researchers at Nagoya University Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Prevention of arterial graft...

August 17, 2014



New Findings on Heart Bypass Surgery Discussed by Researchers at Nagoya University Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Prevention of arterial graft spasm in rats using a vasodilator-eluting biodegradable nano-scaled fibre)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Heart Disease Weekly -- Data detailed on Cardiology have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Nagoya, Japan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Arterial graft spasm occasionally causes circulatory collapse immediately following coronary artery bypass graft. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of our developed materials, which were composed of milrinone (phosphodiesterase III inhibitor) or diltiazem (calcium-channel blocker), with nano-scaled fibre made of biodegradable polymer to prevent arterial spasm."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Nagoya University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, "Milrinone-or diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibres were fabricated by an electrospinning procedure. In vivo milrinone-or diltiazem-releasing tests were performed to confirm the sustained release of the drugs. An in vivo arterial spasm model was established by subcutaneous injection of noradrenalin around the rat femoral artery. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as follows: those that received 5 mg of milrinone-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre (group M, n=14); 5 mg of diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre (group D, n=12); or those that received fibre without drugs (as a control; group C, n=14) implanted into the rat femoral artery. In the fourth group, sham operation was performed (group S, n=10). One day after the implantation, noradrenalin was injected in all groups. The femoral arterial blood flow was measured continuously before and after noradrenalin injection. The maximum blood flow before noradrenalin injection and minimum blood flow after noradrenalin injection were measured. In vivo drug-releasing test revealed that milrinone-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre released 78% of milrinone and diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre released 50% diltiazem on the first day. The ratios of rat femoral artery blood flow after/before noradrenalin injection in groups M (0.74 0.16) and D (0.72 0.05) were significantly higher than those of groups C (0.54 0.09) and S (0.55 0.16) (p

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results suggested that our materials might be effective for the prevention of arterial graft spasm after coronary artery bypass graft."

For more information on this research see: Prevention of arterial graft spasm in rats using a vasodilator-eluting biodegradable nano-scaled fibre. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 2013;17(1):16-22. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery - icvts.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K. Yagami, Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. Additional authors for this research include A. Yamawaki-Ogata, M. Satake, H. Kaneko, H. Oshima, A. Usui, Y. Ueda and Y. Narita (see also Cardiology).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Japan, Nagoya, Cardiology, Heart Bypass Surgery, Coronary Artery Bypass.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Heart Disease Weekly


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