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New Controlled Release Research Findings from Tel Aviv University Described (Quaternized starch-based carrier for siRNA delivery: From cellular...

August 15, 2014



New Controlled Release Research Findings from Tel Aviv University Described (Quaternized starch-based carrier for siRNA delivery: From cellular uptake to gene silencing)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Drug Week -- Current study results on Drugs and Therapies have been published. According to news reporting originating from Tel Aviv, Israel, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "RNAi therapeutics is a powerful tool for treating diseases by sequence-specific targeting of genes using siRNA. Since its discovery, the need for a safe and efficient delivery system for siRNA has increased."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Tel Aviv University, "Here, we have developed and characterized a delivery platform for siRNA based on the natural polysaccharide starch in an attempt to address unresolved delivery challenges of RNAi. Modified potato starch (Q-starch) was successfully obtained by substitution with quaternary reagent, providing Q-starch with cationic properties. The results indicate that Q-starch was able to bind siRNA by self-assembly formation of complexes. For efficient and potent gene silencing we monitored the physical characteristics of the formed nanoparticles at increasing N/P molar ratios. The minimum ratio for complete entrapment of siRNA was 2. The resulting complexes, which were characterized by a small diameter (similar to 30 nm) and positive surface charge, were able to protect siRNA from enzymatic degradation. Q-starch/siRNA complexes efficiently induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene silencing in the human ovarian adeno-carcinoma cell line, NCI-ADR/Res (NAR), over expressing the targeted gene and presenting low toxicity. Additionally, Q-starch-based complexes showed high cellular uptake during a 24-hour study, which also suggested that intracellular siRNA delivery barriers governed the kinetics of siRNA transfection."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "In this study, we have devised a promising siRNA delivery vector based on a starch derivative for efficient and safe RNAi application."

For more information on this research see: Quaternized starch-based carrier for siRNA delivery: From cellular uptake to gene silencing. Journal of Controlled Release, 2014;185():109-120. Journal of Controlled Release can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Controlled Release - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/502690)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting E. Amar-Lewis, Tel Aviv University, Center Nanosci & Nanotechnol, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel. Additional authors for this research include A. Azagury, R. Chintakunta, R. Goldbart, T. Traitel, J. Prestwood, D. Landesman-Milo, D. Peer and J. Kost (see also Drugs and Therapies).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Israel, Tel Aviv, Drugs and Therapies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Drug Week


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