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New Blood Cells Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at University Clinic (Anti-oxidative effects and harmlessness of asymmetric Au@Fe3O4 Janus...

August 12, 2014



New Blood Cells Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at University Clinic (Anti-oxidative effects and harmlessness of asymmetric Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles on human blood cells)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Blood Cells are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Jena, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The physical properties of asymmetric Janus particles are highly promising for future biomedical applications. However, only a few data is available on their biological impact on human cells."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from University Clinic, "We investigated the biological impact of different Au@Fe3O4 Janus particle formulations in vitro to analyse specific uptake modalities and their potential cytotoxic effects on human cells of the blood regarding intravenous injection. We demonstrate that Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles exhibit a similar or even better biocompatibility compared to the well-studied spherical iron oxide nanoparticles. The impact of Janus particles on cells depends mainly on three factors. (1) Surface functionalization: NH2-functionalization of the Au or iron oxide domain induces a pronounced reduction of cell viability in contrast to non-functionalized variants which is caused by the damage of intracellular membranes. (2) The nature of the metal oxide component, greatly affects cell viability, as shown by a comparison with Au@MnO Janus particles. (3) The overall surface charge and the size of nanoparticles have a higher impact on internalization and cellular metabolism than the Janus character per se. Interestingly, Janus particle associated DNA damage is independent of the effects on the cellular ATP level. However, not only the structure and functionalization of the Janus particle surface determines the particle's adhesion and intracellular fate, but also the constitution of the cell surface as shown by different modification experiments. The multifactorial in vitro approach presented in this study demonstrated the high capability of the Janus particles."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Especially Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles bear great potential for applications in vivo."

For more information on this research see: Anti-oxidative effects and harmlessness of asymmetric Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles on human blood cells. Biomaterials, 2014;35(25):6986-6997. Biomaterials can be contacted at: Elsevier Sci Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from L. Landgraf, Univ Klinikum Jena, Inst Anat 2, D-07743 Jena, Germany. Additional authors for this research include P. Ernst, I. Schick, O. Kohler, H. Oehring, W. Tremel and I. Hilger (see also Blood Cells).

Keywords for this news article include: Jena, Europe, Germany, Blood Cells, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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