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New Biology Study Findings Have Been Reported by P. Aravamudhan and Co-Researchers (Assembling the Protein Architecture of the Budding Yeast...

August 12, 2014



New Biology Study Findings Have Been Reported by P. Aravamudhan and Co-Researchers (Assembling the Protein Architecture of the Budding Yeast Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment using FRET)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Life Science Research is the subject of a report. According to news originating from Tamil Nadu, India, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The kinetochore is a multiprotein machine that couples chromosome movement to microtubule (MT) polymerization and depolymerization. It uses numerous copies of at least three MT-binding proteins to generate bidirectional movement."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research, "The nanoscale organization of these proteins within the kinetochore plays an important role in shaping the mechanisms that drive persistent, bidirectional movement of the kinetochore. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between genetically encoded fluorescent proteins fused to kinetochore subunits to reconstruct the nanoscale organization of the budding yeast kinetochore. We performed >60 FRET and high-resolution colocalization measurements involving the essential MT-binding kinetochore components: Ndc80, Dam1, Spc105, and Stu2. These measurements reveal that neighboring Ndc80 complexes within the kinetochore are narrowly distributed along the length of the MT. Dam1 complex molecules are concentrated near the MT-binding domains of Ndc80. Stu2 localizes in high abundance within a narrowly defined territory within the kinetochore centered similar to 20 nm on the centromeric side of the Dam1 complex. Our data show that the MT attachment site of the budding yeast kinetochore is well organized. Ndc80, Dam1, and Stu2 are all narrowly distributed about their average positions along the kinetochore-MT axis."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The relative organization of these components, their narrow distributions, and their known MT-binding properties together elucidate how their combined actions generate persistent, bidirectional kinetochore movement coupled to MT polymerization and depolymerization."

For more information on this research see: Assembling the Protein Architecture of the Budding Yeast Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment using FRET. Current Biology, 2014;24(13):1437-1446. Current Biology can be contacted at: Cell Press, 600 Technology Square, 5TH Floor, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Current Biology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/601284)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from P. Aravamudhan, Sastra Univ, Thanjavur 613402, Tamil Nadu, India. Additional authors for this research include I. Felzer-Kim, K. Gurunathan and A.P. Joglekar (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, India, Tamil Nadu, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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