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Findings on Mycotoxins Reported by Researchers at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) [A regeneratable, label-free, localized surface...

August 12, 2014



Findings on Mycotoxins Reported by Researchers at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) [A regeneratable, label-free, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Biological Factors. According to news reporting originating in Gwangju, South Korea, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Binding of an analyte on the surface of a nanoparticle typically promotes a change in the local refractive index, which gives rise to a shift in the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption band. The magnitude of the LSPR wavelength change is dependent on both the location of the analyte relative to the surface of the nanoparticle and the degree of alteration of the refractive index."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), "We have employed this phenomenon as the basis for designing a new, label-free approach for the detection of the toxic mold mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA) that employs a gold nanorod (GNR) and an aptamer target binding mechanism. In this system, binding of OTA causes an accumulation of OTA and G-quadruplex structure of the aptamer. This process results in a longitudinal wavelength shift of the LSPR peak associated with a change in the local refractive index near the GNR surface. By using this method, OTA can be quantitatively detected at concentrations lower than 1 nM. In addition, the results of this effort show that aptamer functionalized GNR substrate is robust in that it can be regenerated for reuse over seven times by heating in methanol at 70 C to remove OTA. Moreover, the proposed biosensor system exhibits high selectivity for OTA over other mycotoxins."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Finally, the sensor can be employed to detect OTA in ground corn samples with excellent recovery levels."

For more information on this research see: A regeneratable, label-free, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A. Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 2014;59():321-7. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biosensors & Bioelectronics - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/405913)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.H. Park, Dept. of Chemistry, School of Physics and Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Gwangju 500-712, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include J.Y. Byun, H. Mun, W.B. Shim, Y.B. Shin, T. Li and M.G Kim (see also Biological Factors).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Gwangju, Mycotoxins, South Korea, Ochratoxins, Biological Toxins, Biological Factors.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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