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Findings from Pasteur Institute Broaden Understanding of Genetics and Malaria [Non-allele specific antibody responses to genetically distinct variant...

August 13, 2014



Findings from Pasteur Institute Broaden Understanding of Genetics and Malaria [Non-allele specific antibody responses to genetically distinct variant forms of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) in Iranians exposed to seasonal ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Mosquito-Borne Diseases have been published. According to news originating from Tehran, Iran, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Duffy binding protein (BP) is a leading vaccine candidate of Plasmodium vivax. The binding domain of DBP (DBP-II) is polymorphic, that may be a major. challenge for development of a broadly effective vaccine against vivax malaria."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Pasteur Institute, "The present investigation was undertaken to explore whether the sequence diversity of DBP-II causes variation in naturally acquired anti-DBP-II antibodies. In this study, the five genetically distinct variants were expressed, and anti-DBP-II responses were measured in P. vivax-infected individuals (n = 202). Finally, by performing immune-depletion ELISA experiments, antibody responses to the conserved sites of all allelic forms were evaluated using the corresponding and non-corresponding patients' sera (n = 20). In this study, natural P. vivax infection produces IgG against all five examined variant forms of PvDBP-II with no statistically difference. Sequence analysis in the 20 selected samples (for antibody depletion experiment) showed eight distinct haplotypes, DBPI (n = 1), DBPIII (n = 3), DBPIV (n = 1), DBPV (n = 1), DBPVI (n = 5), DBPIX (n = 6), DBPX (n = 1), and DBP XI (n = 2). The results showed the presence of the cross-reactive antibody responses to heterologous variants of PvDBP-II in Iranian individuals who were infected with distinct allelic forms of the PvDBP-II."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Therefore, it is proposed that the majority of antibodies recognized sharing B-cell epitopes and this could overcome the PvDBP-II variation as a one of the biggest challenges of PvDBP-II-based vaccine development."

For more information on this research see: Non-allele specific antibody responses to genetically distinct variant forms of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) in Iranians exposed to seasonal malaria transmission. Acta Tropica, 2014;136():89-100. Acta Tropica can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Acta Tropica - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/506043)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from V. Valizadeh, Pasteur Inst Iran, Biotechnol Res Center, MVRG, Tehran, Iran. Additional authors for this research include S. Zakeri, A.A. Mehrizi and N.D. Djadid (see also Mosquito-Borne Diseases).

Keywords for this news article include: Iran, Asia, Antibodies, Tehran, Genetics, Immunology, Blood Proteins, Immunoglobulins, Malaria Vaccines, Plasmodium vivax, Tropical Disease, Protozoan Vaccines, Biological Products, Protozoan Infections, Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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