News Column

Findings from Otto-von-Guericke-University Provides New Data about Brain Research (Surfactants, not size or zeta-potential influence blood-brain...

August 15, 2014



Findings from Otto-von-Guericke-University Provides New Data about Brain Research (Surfactants, not size or zeta-potential influence blood-brain barrier passage of polymeric nanoparticles)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Drug Week -- Researchers detail new data in Brain Research. According to news reporting originating from Magdeburg, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Nanoparticles (NP) can deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but little is known which of the factors surfactant, size and zeta-potential are essential for allowing BBB passage. To this end we designed purpose-built fluorescent polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) NP and imaged the NP's passage over the blood-retina barrier -which is a model of the BBB -in live animals."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Otto-von-Guericke-University, "Rats received intravenous injections of fluorescent PBCA-NP fabricated by mini-emulsion polymerisation to obtain various NP's compositions that varied in surfactants (non-ionic, anionic, cationic), size (67-464nm) and zeta-potential. Real-time imaging of retinal blood vessels and retinal tissue was carried out with in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) before, during and after NP's injection. Successful BBB passage with subsequent cellular labelling was achieved if NP were fabricated with non-ionic surfactants or cationic stabilizers but not when anionic compounds were added. NP's size and charge had no influence on BBB passage and cell labelling. This transport was not caused by an unspecific opening of the BBB because control experiments with injections of unlabelled NP and fluorescent dye (to test a 'door-opener' effect) did not lead to parenchymal labelling. Thus, neither NP's size nor chemo-electric charge, but particle surface is the key factor determining BBB passage. This result has important implications for NP engineering in medicine: depending on the surfactant, NP can serve one of two opposite functions: while non-ionic tensides enhance brain up-take, addition of anionic tensides prevents it."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "NP can now be designed to specifically enhance drug delivery to the brain or, alternatively, to prevent brain penetration so to reduce unwanted psychoactive effects of drugs or prevent environmental nanoparticles from entering tissue of the central nervous system."

For more information on this research see: Surfactants, not size or zeta-potential influence blood-brain barrier passage of polymeric nanoparticles. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 2014;87(1):19-29. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/600120)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Voigt, Institute of Medical Psychology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany. Additional authors for this research include P. Henrich-Noack, S. Kockentiedt, W. Hintz, J. Tomas and B.A Sabel (see also Brain Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Germany, Magdeburg, Nanoparticle, Brain Research, Nanotechnology, Blood Brain Barrier, Emerging Technologies.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Drug Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters