News Column

Findings from National Aeronautics and Space Administration Update Understanding of Friction, Lubrification and Wear (An experimental study of lunar...

August 12, 2014



Findings from National Aeronautics and Space Administration Update Understanding of Friction, Lubrification and Wear (An experimental study of lunar dust erosive wear potential using the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- Investigators publish new report on Friction, Lubrification and Wear. According to news reporting originating from Cleveland, Ohio, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "The exhaust plumes from spacecraft landing on Earth's moon advect lunar dust particles which have been shown to erode, or 'sandblast', nearby objects. Evidence of this phenomenon was provided by NASA's Apollo 12 mission during which exhaust ejecta, generated by the Apollo Lunar Module landing, erosively wore components of the Surveyor III lunar probe located 155 m from the Apollo 12 landing site."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from National Aeronautics and Space Administration, "Recently, interest in new lunar missions has been expressed by a number of different groups including countries and private companies. With the potential for a large number of new lunar landings in relatively close proximity to each other and existing lunar hardware, efforts must be taken to understand the damage that lunar dust particle erosion can cause to material surfaces. In this work, a study was conducted with the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant to understand the erosive potential of lunar dust. Metallic and acrylic test specimens were exposed to erosive wear and the changes in mass, surface topography, transmittance, and reflectance are reported. It was observed that exposure to erosive wear from JSC-1AF, even at moderate velocities (approximately 105 m/s), resulted in a significant decrease in direct transmittance and total reflectance greater than 70% in some cases."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The results in this study suggest that optical components, such as lenses and mirrors are highly susceptible to damage during lunar landings due to lunar dust particle impingement."

For more information on this research see: An experimental study of lunar dust erosive wear potential using the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. Wear, 2014;316(1-2):79-91. Wear can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Sa, PO Box 564, 1001 Lausanne, Switzerland. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Wear - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/504107)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.N. Mpagazehe, NASA Glenn Res Center, Cleveland, OH 44135, United States. Additional authors for this research include K.W. Street, I.R. Delgado and C.F. Higgs.

Keywords for this news article include: Cleveland, Ohio, United States, North and Central America, Friction, Lubrification and Wear

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Journal of Technology


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters