News Column

Airplanes Gave U.S. Factory Orders a Lift in June

August 5, 2014

Josh Boak, The Associated Press

U.S. factory orders rose in June (AP)
U.S. factory orders rose in June (AP)

WASHINGTON - Orders to U.S. factories increased in June, led by demand for aircraft, industrial machinery and computers and electronics.

Orders rose a seasonally adjusted 1.1 per cent compared to the previous month, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. Factory orders had fallen 0.6 per cent in May after three straight months of gains.

An 8.4 per cent jump in demand for commercial aircraft fueled the latest gains. But there were additional increases outside this volatile category that point to businesses investing with the expectation of economic growth.

Orders for machinery rose 2.9 per cent. Iron and steel mills had a 1.7 per cent increase in demand, while orders for computers and electronic products were up 2.9 per cent.

Excluding military hardware, factory orders rose 1 per cent in June from May.

Over the past year, factory orders were up 2.5 per cent.

The improved outlook for business spending has helped drive growth. The economy grew at an annual rate of 4 per cent in the April-June quarter, after slipping 2.1 per cent during the first three months of the year when brutal winter weather closed some assembly lines.

Manufacturing has rebounded as the weather improved.

The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, reported Friday that its manufacturing index rose to 57.1, up from 55.3 in June. A reading above 50 signals that manufacturing is growing.

The increased demand has fueled hiring. The Labor Department said Friday that employers added more than 200,000 jobs in July for the sixth straight month. Factories accounted for 28,000 new jobs in July. Over the past year, manufacturers have added 178,000 jobs, best 12-month stretch of hiring since November 2012.

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Original headline: US factory orders up 1.1 pct in June, led by aircraft, machinery, computers and electronics



Source: © 2014 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.


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