News Column

Patent Application Titled "Inspecting Replicated Data" Published Online

September 2, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Information Technology Newsweekly -- According to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews journalists, a patent application by the inventors Wankawala, Pranav (Sunnyvale, CA); Chen, Yingyu (Shanghai, CN); Lueckhoff, Hermann (Sunnyvale, CA); Shi, Jun (Palo Alto, CA), filed on February 14, 2013, was made available online on August 21, 2014.

No assignee for this patent application has been made.

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "This description relates to a method, system and computer readable medium for detecting data integrity and inconsistence issues when replicating data in data storage and data processing systems.

"Many different kinds of replication tools are used to move data from a source application (e.g., enterprise resource planning (ERP)) running on, for example, database systems (e.g., Oracle.TM., MS-SQL.TM., and the like) into a destination application running on another database system. For example, moving data from traditional applications running on traditional database systems into an In-Memory database (e.g., high-performance analytic appliance (HANA)).

"The HANA (e.g., SAP.TM. HANA) may be a data warehouse appliance for processing high volumes of operational and transactional data in real-time. HANA may use in-memory analytics, an approach that queries data stored in random access memory (RAM) instead of on hard disk or flash storage. A common problem when moving (e.g., replicating) data using a replication tool is a lack of data integrity and data inconsistency.

"For example, replication tools are reactive in nature. Certain actions that happen on the source device or application cause an appropriate reaction from the replicator tool. Typically, the action would be an insert to a database, which is logged via database log files, database triggers or scanning via polling. Once a change is identified, the reaction is typically to copy all the relevant data and replicate the data into the destination system.

"Replication tools may perform this task in a sequential generic manner. For example, when a change is detected in the source device or application, the replication tool queues the changes and replicates the changes in the destination device or application. Replication may not consider transactional integrity. Because the replication tool does not consider transactional integrity, a logical unit of work in an application including data across 4-5 different tables is replicated into the destination device or application in a completely random fashion. For example, in one scenario an ideal sequence for data replication may be Header, Line1, Line2, SubLine1.1, Subline 1.2 (as created in the source system). However, during replication the data gets created on the destination device or application in the sequence Line1, Header, Subline 1.1, SubLine1.2, Line2. As a result, data integrity issues may be present at some point in time during replication.

"In addition, typically data may be continuously replicated from the source device or application to the destination device or application. If a program is being executed on the destination device or application, and updates are made on the table, these changes do not get reflected in the executing program, leading to incorrect results. As a result, data inconsistency issues may be present during program execution.

"Further, typically during replication table locking may be necessary. In order to guarantee the data consistency and integrity, applications may use a lock mechanism. Traditional 'SELECT FOR UPDATE' or 'SELECT . . . LOCK' are effective for single server case (both on-line transactional processing (OLTP) and on-line analytical processing (OLAP) on same server). However, in the case of multiple servers (e.g., OLTP on enterprise core component (ECC) and OLAP on HANA), the traditional lock mechanism may be ineffective because all the data is replicated from source server to destination or target server by a data replication tool (e.g., SAP landscape transformation (SLT)). The replication tool is unable to run analysis on the destination or target server while locking the corresponding data rows on source server to prevent changes."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent application, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "One embodiment includes a system for monitoring data changes during a data replication process. The system includes a modeling module configured to select tables and fields to be monitored during execution of the data replication process, a trigger module configured to track changes of data being generated during execution of a program by inserting triggers into a destination system at the start of a program execution and then dropping the trigger at the end of program execution, a snapshot module configured to track changes of data being generated during execution of a program by generating a snapshot of data at the beginning and the end of program execution, and a report module configured to generate a report indicating changes in data based on the changes in data indicated by the triggers and based on the changes in data indicated by the snapshots of data.

"Another embodiment includes a method for monitoring data changes during a data replication process. The method includes receiving an indication that a program execution has started, generating an initial data snapshot of replicated data, receiving an indication that a program data has posted, generating a final data snapshot of the replicated data, and generating a report based on the initial data snapshot and the final data snapshot.

"Another embodiment includes a method for monitoring data changes during a data replication process. The method includes receiving an indication that a program execution has started, generating a trigger on at least one table associated with the program, executing the trigger such that data changes are logged, receiving an indication that a program data has posted, deleting the trigger, and generating a report based on the logged data changes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"Example embodiments will become more fully understood from the detailed description given herein below and the accompanying drawings, wherein like elements are represented by like reference numerals, which are given by way of illustration only and thus are not limiting of the example embodiments and wherein:

"FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of a system according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of a system according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 3 illustrates a block diagram of a system according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 4 illustrates a block diagram showing a relationship between replicated tables and a snapshot table according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 5 illustrates a method according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 6 illustrates a method according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 7 illustrates a method according to one or more example embodiments.

"FIG. 8 illustrates a method according to one or more example embodiments.

"It should be noted that these Figures are intended to illustrate the general characteristics of methods, structure and/or materials utilized in certain example embodiments and to supplement the written description provided below. These drawings are not, however, to scale and may not precisely reflect the precise structural or performance characteristics of any given embodiment, and should not be interpreted as defining or limiting the range of values or properties encompassed by example embodiments. For example, the relative thicknesses and positioning of molecules, layers, regions and/or structural elements may be reduced or exaggerated for clarity. The use of similar or identical reference numbers in the various drawings is intended to indicate the presence of a similar or identical element or feature."

For more information, see this patent application: Wankawala, Pranav; Chen, Yingyu; Lueckhoff, Hermann; Shi, Jun. Inspecting Replicated Data. Filed February 14, 2013 and posted August 21, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=672&p=14&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140814.PD.&OS=PD/20140814&RS=PD/20140814

Keywords for this news article include: Patents, Information Technology, Information and Data Validation, Information and Data Replication.

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Source: Information Technology Newsweekly


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