News Column

Patent Application Titled "Device for Delivery of Medical Devices to a Cardiac Valve" Published Online

September 4, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- According to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews journalists, a patent application by the inventor Krahbichler, Erik (Helsingborg, SE), filed on May 7, 2012, was made available online on August 21, 2014.

The assignee for this patent application is Contego AB.

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The human heart is a hollow muscular organ, responsible for pumping a large volume of blood around the human body every day. The ability to pump the blood is facilitated by several heart valves which open and close appropriately to allow blood passage through the heart. Heart valve dysfunction through natural defects or through the increasing incidence of heart disease, often requires the dysfunctional valve to be treated, with the main treatment modalities being mechanical adjustment of the valve or replacing the valve altogether. Current medical techniques are aimed at moving away from the major open heart surgery procedure, which is very traumatic for the patient, to more minimally invasive catheter based procedures, which are less traumatic, although more complicated procedures.

"Catheter based procedures require precise positioning of the catheter, used to deliver for example the replacement valve, in an optimal position in relation to the cardiac valve to be treated. This is especially important as misalignment has the potential to damage adjacent cardiac structures leading to severe coronary complications. Placement of the catheter adjacent to a heart valve is hampered by the fact that the heart continues to pump throughout the procedure, giving rise to significant levels of turbulence which the catheter has to overcome to maintain its position. Furthermore, clotting of the blood leading to emboli is a continuous threat, as potentially they can lead to serious complications such as stroke.

"In the US application 2009/0030510A1, it is disclosed that a significant obstacle to replacement of an aortic valve is the accurate placement of the medical device to replace the aortic valve. The solution taught to this problem is a temporary aortic valve (TAV) device. This is a catheter which has at the distal end a plurality of balloons, which can be inflated to stabilize the position of the TAV by applying pressure directly to the aortic walls of the patient. Further valve modulating tools can be passed through the lumen of the TAV. Between the balloons, blood is allowed to pass, simulating aortic valve function. This device is devised for the ablation and replacement of the aortic valve, with the balloons of the TAV fully inflated throughout the procedure to facilitate lodgment against the arterial walls.

"The balloons are inflated throughout the entire medical procedure. As the balloons hamper bloodflow by restricting the available cross section for blood flow of the aortic lumen, potentially leading to leading a number of undesired issues. For instance, deliverable blood volume during the procedure may be reduced having potential dire consequences for the patient. Blood pressure may increase upstream the restriction created by the inflated balloons. The balloons may dislocate the longer time they are inflated in the aortic lumen, e.g. due to the increased blood pressure upstream thereof.

"WO 2006/029370 and US 2009/0287182 discloses expandable transluminal sheaths. The distal end of the sheath is maintained in the first, low cross-sectional configuration during advancement through the atrial septum into the left atrium. The distal end of the sheath is expanded using a radial dialator, a balloon, to dialate the hole in the tissue of the atrial septum. A problem is that the device is not sufficiently stabilized for secure positioning. The radial expansion is purely for allowing the hole to heal more completely as opposed to cutting a large hole from the start.

"US2005/0085842 discloses an expandable guide sheath. The sheath is advanced into a blood vessel in a contracted condition, expanded to an enlarged condition to define a lumen. The expanded lumen is for delivering fluids or instruments. Also in this prior art, a problem is that the device is not sufficiently stabilized for secure positioning. A filter is disclosed in the form of a hoop. The frame of the hoop is placed in circumferential apposition with the vessel for collecting emboli transported in the vessel.

"US2003/0171803 discloses a similar hoop shaped filter basket with frame of the hoop placed in circumferential contact with the vessel wall.

"Hence, improved or alternative medical devices and procedures for stabilizing the introducer sheath during cardiac valve replacement would be advantageous, in particular allowing for increased cost-effectiveness, and/or patient safety."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent application, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "Accordingly, embodiments of the present invention preferably seek to mitigate, alleviate or eliminate one or more deficiencies, disadvantages or issues in the art, such as the above-identified, singly or in any combination by providing a medical device and a method according to the appended patent claims.

"The present invention is an introducer sheath with an embolic protection unit that protects the side branch vessels of the aortic arch to decrease the risk for embolism, from for example debris emanating from the treatment of a stenotic valve, while allowing positioning of the sheath at the cardiac valve and delivering of medical devices therethrough. In addition, the introducer sheath overcomes the positional problems that current catheters face, by using a locking system which locks the catheter to maintain it at the desired anatomical position. In addition to maintaining the position, the invention is so devised so that interference with the blood flow is minimal.

"According to a first aspect, a catheter device is provided for transvascular delivery of a medical device to a cardiac valve region of a patient. The catheter device comprises an elongate sheath with a lumen and a distal end for positioning at a heart valve, and a second channel that extends parallel to, or in, said elongate sheath, an expandable embolic protection unit, such as a filter, wherein at least a portion of the expandable embolic protection unit is arranged to extend from an orifice of the second channel, wherein the embolic protection unit is non-tubular, extending substantially planar in the expanded state for covering ostia of the side branch vessels in the aortic arch.

"In a second aspect, a method of transvascularly delivering a medical device to a cardiac valve of a patient is provided. The comprises providing and minimally invasively introducing a catheter comprising an elongate sheath with a lumen in a relaxed state into said vascular system; navigating a distal end of said elongate sheath through said vascular system to said cardiac valve; expanding an embolic protection unit from a second channel in said sheath to cover ostia of the side branch vessels in the aortic arch and to stabilize a distal end of said sheath at the cardiac valve, delivering a medical device through the lumen of said locked elongate sheath to said heart valve while said embolic protection unit covers said ostia.

"Further embodiments of the invention are defined in the dependent claims, wherein features for the second and subsequent aspects of the invention are as for the first aspect mutatis mutandis.

"It should be emphasized that the term 'comprises/comprising' when used in this specification is taken to specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps or components but does not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, components or groups thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"These and other aspects, features and advantages of which embodiments of the invention are capable of will be apparent and elucidated from the following description of embodiments of the present invention, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which

"FIG. 1A is a schematic illustration of an elongate sheath connected to a hemostatic valve;

"FIG. 1B is a schematic illustration of an elongate member, with the radially expandable units in the collapsed configuration;

"FIG. 2A is a schematic illustration of the distal end portion of the elongate member with the radially expandable units in the collapsed configuration;

"FIG. 2B is a schematic illustration of the distal end portion of the elongate member with the radially expandable units in the expanded configuration;

"FIG. 2C is a schematic illustration frontal view of the distal end portion of the elongate member with the radially expandable units in the collapsed configuration;

"FIG. 2D is a schematic illustration frontal view of the distal end portion of the elongate member with the radially expandable units in the expanded configuration;

"FIG. 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D are schematic illustrations of embodiments of the elongate sheath in the flexible, unlocked configuration;

"FIG. 3E is a schematic illustration of the cross sectional view of the elongate sheath in the unlocked state;

"FIG. 3F is a schematic illustration of one embodiment of the cross sectional view of the elongate sheath in a locked state;

"FIG. 3G is a schematic illustration of another embodiment of the cross sectional view of the elongate sheath in the locked state;

"FIG. 4A is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transaxillary to a cardiac valve, where an embolic protection filter is deployed, and the sheath is in a relaxed state;

"FIG. 4B is a schematic illustration where the relaxed sheath is positioned in relation to the cardiac valve by expandable units of an elongate member extending outside the distal end of the sheath;

"FIG. 4C is a schematic illustration of the cross sectional view of the elongate sheath incorporating a second channel for delivering the embolic protection filter;

"FIG. 4D is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transaxillary to a cardiac valve, and the sheath is in the locked configuration arranged relative to an aortic cardiac valve, and the expandable units being withdrawn after positioning the sheath;

"FIG. 4E is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transfemorally to a cardiac valve, where an embolic protection filter is deployed and the sheath in the locked configuration;

"FIG. 4F is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transaxillary to a cardiac valve, and where the relaxed sheath is positioned in relation to the cardiac valve by expandable units of the sheath;

"FIG. 4G is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transaxillary to a cardiac valve, and where an embolic protection filter is deployed over the vessels in the aortic arch via a second channel of the sheath;

"FIG. 4H is a schematic illustration of the elongate sheath delivered transfemorally to a cardiac valve, and where an embolic protection filter is deployed over the vessels in the aortic arch via a second channel of the sheath; and

"FIG. 5 is a flowchart for a method of implanting a medical device."

For more information, see this patent application: Krahbichler, Erik. Device for Delivery of Medical Devices to a Cardiac Valve. Filed May 7, 2012 and posted August 21, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1172&p=24&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140814.PD.&OS=PD/20140814&RS=PD/20140814

Keywords for this news article include: Angiology, Cardiology.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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