News Column

IMMUNOGEN INC - 10-K - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

August 28, 2014

Overview

Since our inception, we have been principally engaged in the development of novel, antibody-drug conjugates, or ADC's, for the treatment of cancer using our expertise in cancer biology, monoclonal antibodies, highly potent cytotoxic, or cell-killing, agents, and the design of linkers that enable these agents to remain stably attached to the antibodies while in the blood stream and released in their fully active form after delivery to a cancer cell. An anticancer compound made using our ADC technology consists of a monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to an antigen target found on the surface of cancer cells with one of our proprietary cell-killing agents attached to the antibody using one of our engineered linkers. Its antibody component enables an ADC compound to bind specifically to cancer cells that express its target antigen, the highly potent cytotoxic agent serves to kill the cancer cell, and the engineered linker controls the release and activation of the cytotoxic agent inside the cancer cell. With some ADC compounds, the antibody component also has anticancer activity of its own. Our ADC technology is designed to enable the creation of highly effective, well-tolerated anticancer products. All of the ADC compounds currently in clinical testing contain either DM1 or DM4 as the cytotoxic agent. Both DM1 and DM4, collectively DMx, are our proprietary derivatives of a cytotoxic agent called maytansine. We also use our expertise in antibodies and cancer biology to develop "naked," or non-conjugated, antibody anticancer product candidates.

We have used our proprietary ADC technology in conjunction with our in-house antibody expertise to develop our own anticancer product candidates. We have also entered into agreements that enable companies to use our ADC technology to develop and commercialize product candidates to specified targets. Under the terms of our agreements, we are generally entitled to upfront fees, milestone payments, and royalties on any commercial product sales. In addition, under certain agreements we are compensated for research and development activities performed at our collaborative partner's request at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third parties would charge. We are compensated to manufacture preclinical and clinical materials and deliver cytotoxic agent material at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third parties would charge. Currently, our partners include Amgen, Bayer HealthCare, Biotest, CytomX, Lilly, Novartis, Roche and Sanofi. We expect that substantially all of our revenue for the foreseeable future will result from payments under our collaborative arrangements. Details for some of our major and recent collaborative agreements can be found in this Form 10-K under Item 1. Business.

To date, we have not generated revenues from commercial sales of internal products and we expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future. As of June 30, 2014, we had approximately $142.3 million in cash and cash equivalents compared to $195 million as of June 30, 2013.

We anticipate that future cash expenditures will be partially offset by collaboration-derived proceeds, including milestone payments, royalties and upfront fees. Accordingly, period-to-period operational results may fluctuate dramatically based upon the timing of receipt of the proceeds. We believe that our established collaborative agreements, while subject to specified milestone achievements, will provide funding to assist us in meeting obligations under our collaborative agreements while also assisting in providing funding for the development of internal product candidates and technologies. However, we can give no assurances that such collaborative agreement funding will, in fact, be realized in the time frames we expect, or at all. Should we or our partners not meet some or all of the terms and conditions of our various collaboration agreements, we may be required to secure alternative financing arrangements, find additional partners and/or defer or limit some or all of our research, development and/or clinical projects. However, we cannot provide assurance that any such opportunities presented by additional partners or alternative financing arrangements will be entirely available to us, if at all.

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Critical Accounting Policies

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to our collaborative agreements, clinical trial accruals, inventory and stock-based compensation. We base our estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

We believe the following critical accounting policies reflect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

We enter into licensing and development agreements with collaborative partners for the development of monoclonal antibody-based anticancer therapeutics. The terms of these agreements contain multiple deliverables which may include (i) licenses, or options to obtain licenses, to our ADC technology, (ii) rights to future technological improvements, (iii) research activities to be performed on behalf of the collaborative partner, (iv) delivery of cytotoxic agents and (v) the manufacture of preclinical or clinical materials for the collaborative partner. Payments to us under these agreements may include upfront fees, option fees, exercise fees, payments for research activities, payments for the manufacture of preclinical or clinical materials, payments based upon the achievement of certain milestones and royalties on product sales. We follow the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 605-25, "Revenue Recognition-Multiple-Element Arrangements," and ASC Topic 605-28, "Revenue Recognition-Milestone Method," in accounting for these agreements. In order to account for these agreements, we must identify the deliverables included within the agreement and evaluate which deliverables represent separate units of accounting based on if certain criteria are met, including whether the delivered element has stand-alone value to the collaborator. The consideration received is allocated among the separate units of accounting, and the applicable revenue recognition criteria are applied to each of the separate units.

At June 30, 2014, we had the following two types of agreements with the parties identified below:

º • º Development and commercialization licenses to use our ADC technology and/or certain other intellectual property to develop compounds to a specified target antigen (referred to as development and commercialization licenses, as distinguished from our right-to-test agreements described elsewhere): Amgen (four exclusive single-target licenses*) Bayer HealthCare (one exclusive single-target license) Biotest (one exclusive single-target license) Lilly (one exclusive single-target license) Novartis (two exclusive single-target licenses and one license to two related targets: one target on an exclusive basis and the second target on a non-exclusive basis) Roche, through its Genentech unit (five exclusive single-target licenses) Sanofi (one exclusive single-target license and one exclusive license to multiple individual targets)



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º * º Amgen has sublicensed one of its exclusive single-target licenses to Oxford BioTherapeutics Ltd. 46



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Table of Contents º • º Option/research agreement for a defined period of time to secure development and commercialization licenses to use our ADC technology to develop anticancer compounds to specified targets on established terms (referred to herein as right-to-test agreements): Sanofi Novartis Lilly CytomX



There are no performance, cancellation, termination or refund provisions in any of the arrangements that contain material financial consequences to us.

Development and Commercialization Licenses

The deliverables under a development and commercialization license agreement generally include the exclusive license to our ADC technology with respect to a specified antigen target, and may also include deliverables related to rights to future technological improvements, research activities to be performed on behalf of the collaborative partner and the manufacture of preclinical or clinical materials for the collaborative partner.

Generally, development and commercialization licenses contain non-refundable terms for payments and, depending on the terms of the agreement, provide that we will (i) at the collaborator's request, provide research services at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third parties would charge, (ii) at the collaborator's request, manufacture and provide to it preclinical and clinical materials or deliver cytotoxic agents at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third parties would charge, (iii) earn payments upon the achievement of certain milestones and (iv) earn royalty payments, generally until the later of the last applicable patent expiration or 10 to 12 years after product launch. In the case of Kadcyla, however, the minimum royalty term is 10 years and the maximum royalty term is 12 years on a country-by-country basis, regardless of patent protection. Royalty rates may vary over the royalty term depending on our intellectual property rights and/or the presence of comparable competing products. We may provide technical assistance and share any technology improvements with our collaborators during the term of the collaboration agreements. We do not directly control when or whether any collaborator will request research or manufacturing services, achieve milestones or become liable for royalty payments. As a result, we cannot predict when or if we will recognize revenues in connection with any of the foregoing.

In determining the units of accounting, management evaluates whether the license has stand-alone value from the undelivered elements to the collaborative partner based on the consideration of the relevant facts and circumstances for each arrangement. Factors considered in this determination include the research capabilities of the partner and the availability of ADC technology research expertise in the general marketplace. If we conclude that the license has stand-alone value and therefore will be accounted for as a separate unit of accounting, we then determine the estimated selling prices of the license and all other units of accounting based on market conditions, similar arrangements entered into by third parties, and entity-specific factors such as the terms of our previous collaborative agreements, recent preclinical and clinical testing results of therapeutic products that use our ADC technology, our pricing practices and pricing objectives, the likelihood that technological improvements will be made, and, if made, will be used by our collaborators and the nature of the research services to be performed on behalf of our collaborators and market rates for similar services.

Upfront payments on development and commercialization licenses are deferred if facts and circumstances dictate that the license does not have stand-alone value. Prior to the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2009-13, "Revenue Arrangements with Multiple

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Deliverables" on July 1, 2010, we determined that our licenses lacked stand-alone value and were combined with other elements of the arrangement and any amounts associated with the license were deferred and amortized over a certain period, which we refer to as our period of substantial involvement. The determination of the length of the period over which to defer revenue is subject to judgment and estimation and can have an impact on the amount of revenue recognized in a given period. Historically our involvement with the development of a collaborator's product candidate has been significant at the early stages of development, and lessens as it progresses into clinical trials. Also, as a drug candidate gets closer to commencing pivotal testing our collaborators have sought an alternative site to manufacture their products, as our facility does not produce pivotal or commercial drug product. Accordingly, we generally estimate this period of substantial involvement to begin at the inception of the collaboration agreement and conclude at the end of non-pivotal Phase II testing. We believe this period of substantial involvement is, depending on the nature of the license, on average six and one-half years. Quarterly, we reassess our periods of substantial involvement over which we amortize our upfront license fees and make adjustments as appropriate. In the event a collaborator elects to discontinue development of a specific product candidate under a development and commercialization license, but retains its right to use our technology to develop an alternative product candidate to the same target or a target substitute, we would cease amortization of any remaining portion of the upfront fee until there is substantial preclinical activity on another product candidate and its remaining period of substantial involvement can be estimated. In the event that a development and commercialization license were to be terminated, we would recognize as revenue any portion of the upfront fee that had not previously been recorded as revenue, but was classified as deferred revenue, at the date of such termination.

Subsequent to the adoption of ASU No. 2009-13, we determined that our research licenses lack stand-alone value and are considered for aggregation with the other elements of the arrangement and accounted for as one unit of accounting.

Upfront payments on development and commercialization licenses may be recognized upon delivery of the license if facts and circumstances dictate that the license has stand-alone value from the undelivered elements, which generally include rights to future technological improvements, research services, delivery of cytotoxic agents and the manufacture of preclinical and clinical materials.

We recognize revenue related to research services that represent separate units of accounting as they are performed, as long as there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement, the fee is fixed or determinable, and collection of the related receivable is probable. We recognize revenue related to the rights to future technological improvements over the estimated term of the applicable license.

We may also provide cytotoxic agents to our collaborators or produce preclinical and clinical materials for them at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third parties would charge. We recognize revenue on cytotoxic agents and on preclinical and clinical materials when the materials have passed all quality testing required for collaborator acceptance and title and risk of loss have transferred to the collaborator. Arrangement consideration allocated to the manufacture of preclinical and clinical materials in a multiple-deliverable arrangement is below our full cost, and our full cost is not expected to ever be below our contract selling prices for our existing collaborations. During the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, the difference between our full cost to manufacture preclinical and clinical materials on behalf of our collaborators as compared to total amounts received from collaborators for the manufacture of preclinical and clinical materials was $2.3 million, $755,000, and $85,000, respectively. The majority of our costs to produce these preclinical and clinical materials are fixed and then allocated to each batch based on the number of batches produced during the period. Therefore, our costs to produce these materials are significantly impacted by the number of batches produced during the period. The volume of preclinical and clinical materials we produce is directly related to the number of clinical trials we and our collaborators are preparing for or currently have underway, the speed of enrollment in those trials, the dosage schedule of each

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clinical trial and the time period such trials last. Accordingly, the volume of preclinical and clinical materials produced, and therefore our per-batch costs to manufacture these preclinical and clinical materials, may vary significantly from period to period.

We may also produce research material for potential collaborators under material transfer agreements. Additionally, we perform research activities, including developing antibody specific conjugation processes, on behalf of our collaborators and potential collaborators during the early evaluation and preclinical testing stages of drug development. We record amounts received for research materials produced or services performed as a component of research and development support revenue. We also develop conjugation processes for materials for later stage testing and commercialization for certain collaborators. We are compensated at negotiated rates and may receive milestone payments for developing these processes which are recorded as a component of research and development support revenue.

Our development and commercialization license agreements have milestone payments which for reporting purposes are aggregated into three categories: (i) development milestones, (ii) regulatory milestones, and (iii) sales milestones. Development milestones are typically payable when a product candidate initiates or advances into different clinical trial phases. Regulatory milestones are typically payable upon submission for marketing approval with the FDA or other countries' regulatory authorities or on receipt of actual marketing approvals for the compound or for additional indications. Sales milestones are typically payable when annual sales reach certain levels.

At the inception of each agreement that includes milestone payments, we evaluate whether each milestone is substantive and at risk to both parties on the basis of the contingent nature of the milestone. This evaluation includes an assessment of whether (a) the consideration is commensurate with either (1) the entity's performance to achieve the milestone, or (2) the enhancement of the value of the delivered item(s) as a result of a specific outcome resulting from the entity's performance to achieve the milestone, (b) the consideration relates solely to past performance and (c) the consideration is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the arrangement. We evaluate factors such as the scientific, regulatory, commercial and other risks that must be overcome to achieve the respective milestone, the level of effort and investment required to achieve the respective milestone and whether the milestone consideration is reasonable relative to all deliverables and payment terms in the arrangement in making this assessment.

Non-refundable development and regulatory milestones that are expected to be achieved as a result of our efforts during the period of substantial involvement are considered substantive and are recognized as revenue upon the achievement of the milestone, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Milestones that are not considered substantive because we do not contribute effort to the achievement of such milestones are generally achieved after the period of substantial involvement and are recognized as revenue upon achievement of the milestone, as there are no undelivered elements remaining and no continuing performance obligations, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met.

Under our development and commercialization license agreements, we receive royalty payments based upon our licensees' net sales of covered products. Generally, under these agreements we are to receive royalty reports and payments from our licensees approximately one quarter in arrears, that is, generally in the second month of the quarter after the licensee has sold the royalty bearing product or products. We recognize royalty revenues when we can reliably estimate such amounts and collectability is reasonably assured. As such, we generally recognize royalty revenues in the quarter reported to us by our licensees, or one quarter following the quarter in which sales by our licensees occurred.

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Table of Contents Right-to-Test Agreements



Our right-to-test agreements provide collaborators the right to (a) test our ADC technology for a defined period of time through a research, or right-to-test, license, (b) take options, for a defined period of time, to specified targets and (c) upon exercise of those options, secure or "take" licenses to develop and commercialize products for the specified targets on established terms. Under these agreements, fees may be due to us (i) at the inception of the arrangement (referred to as "upfront" fees or payments), (ii) upon taking an option with respect to a specific target (referred to as option fees or payments earned, if any, when the option is "taken"), (iii) upon the exercise of a previously taken option to acquire a development and commercialization license(s) (referred to as exercise fees or payments earned, if any, when the development and commercialization license is "taken"), or (iv) some combination of all of these fees.

The accounting for right-to-test agreements is dependent on the nature of the option granted to the collaborative partner. Options are considered substantive if, at the inception of a right-to-test agreement, we are at risk as to whether the collaborative partner will choose to exercise the options to secure development and commercialization licenses. Factors that are considered in evaluating whether options are substantive include the overall objective of the arrangement, the benefit the collaborator might obtain from the agreement without exercising the options, the cost to exercise the options relative to the total upfront consideration, and the additional financial commitments or economic penalties imposed on the collaborator as a result of exercising the options.

For right-to-test agreements where the options to secure development and commercialization licenses to our ADC technology are considered substantive, we do not consider the development and commercialization licenses to be a deliverable at the inception of the agreement. For those right-to-test agreements entered into prior to the adoption of ASU No. 2009-13 where the options to secure a development and commercialization license are considered substantive, we have deferred the upfront payments received and recognize this revenue over the period during which the collaborator could elect to take options for development and commercialization licenses. These periods are specific to each collaboration agreement. If a collaborator takes an option to acquire a development and commercialization license under these agreements, any substantive option fee is deferred and recognized over the life of the option, generally 12 to 18 months. If a collaborator exercises an option and takes a development and commercialization license to a specific target, we attribute the exercise fee to the development and commercialization license. Upon exercise of an option to acquire a development and commercialization license, we would also attribute any remaining deferred option fee to the development and commercialization license and apply the multiple-element revenue recognition criteria to the development and commercialization license and any other deliverables to determine the appropriate revenue recognition, which will be consistent with our accounting policy for upfront payments on single-target licenses. In the event a right-to-test agreement were to be terminated, we would recognize as revenue any portion of the upfront fee that had not previously been recorded as revenue, but was classified as deferred revenue, at the date of such termination. None of our right-to-test agreements entered into subsequent to the adoption of ASU No. 2009-13 has been determined to contain substantive options.

For right-to-test agreements where the options to secure development and commercialization licenses to our ADC technology are not considered substantive, we consider the development and commercialization license to be a deliverable at the inception of the agreement and apply the multiple-element revenue recognition criteria to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. None of our right-to-test agreements entered into prior to the adoption of ASU No. 2009-13 has been determined to contain non-substantive options.

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We do not directly control when or if any collaborator will exercise its options for development and commercialization licenses. As a result, we cannot predict when or if we will recognize revenues in connection with any of the foregoing.

Inventory

We review our estimates of the net realizable value of our inventory at each reporting period. Our estimate of the net realizable value of our inventory is subject to judgment and estimation. The actual net realizable value of our inventory could vary significantly from our estimates. We consider quantities of raw materials in excess of twelve-month projected usage that are not supported by firm, fixed collaborator orders and projections at the time of the assessment to be excess. During fiscal years 2014, 2013 and 2012, we obtained additional quantities of DMx from our supplier which amounted to more material than would be required by our collaborators over the next twelve months and as a result, we recorded $364,000, $798,000 and $748,000, respectively, of charges to research and development expense related to raw material inventory identified as excess. We also recorded $38,000 to write down certain raw material inventory to its net realizable value, which is also included in research and development expense for the year ended June 30, 2012. Our collaborators' estimates of their clinical material requirements are based upon expectations of their clinical trials, including the timing, size, dosing schedule and the maximum tolerated dose likely to be reached for the compound being evaluated. Our collaborators' actual requirements for clinical materials may vary significantly from their projections. Significant differences between our collaborators' actual manufacturing orders and their projections could result in our actual twelve-month usage of raw materials varying significantly from our estimated usage at an earlier reporting period. Such differences and/or reductions in collaborators' projections could indicate that we have excess raw material inventory and we would then evaluate the need to record write-downs, which would be included as charges to research and development expense.

Stock-based Compensation

As of June 30, 2014, we are authorized to grant future awards under one share-based compensation plan, which is the ImmunoGen, Inc. 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Equity Incentive Plan. The stock-based awards are accounted for under ASC Topic 718, "Compensation-Stock Compensation," pursuant to which the estimated grant date fair value of awards is charged to the statement of operations over the requisite service period, which is the vesting period. Such amounts have been reduced by our estimate of forfeitures for unvested awards.

The fair value of each stock option is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Expected volatility is based exclusively on historical volatility data of our stock. The expected term of stock options granted is based exclusively on historical data and represents the period of time that stock options granted are expected to be outstanding. The expected term is calculated for and applied to one group of stock options as we do not expect substantially different exercise or post-vesting termination behavior amongst our employee population. The risk-free rate of the stock options is based on the U.S. Treasury rate in effect at the time of grant for the expected term of the stock options. Estimated forfeitures are based on historical data as well as current trends. Stock compensation cost incurred during the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was $15.6 million, $12.4 million and $9.9 million, respectively.

Future stock-based compensation may significantly differ based on changes in the fair value of our common stock and our estimates of expected volatility and the other relevant assumptions.

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Table of Contents Results of Operations Revenues



Our total revenues for the year ended June 30, 2014 were $59.9 million compared with $35.5 million and $16.4 million for the years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The $24.4 million increase in revenues in fiscal year 2014 from fiscal year 2013 is attributable to an increase in license and milestone fees, royalty revenue and clinical materials revenue, partially offset by a decrease in research and development support revenue, all of which are discussed below. The $19.1 million increase in revenues in fiscal year 2013 from fiscal year 2012 is attributable to all revenue categories.

Revenue from license and milestone fees for the year ended June 30, 2014 increased approximately $15.3 million to $39.5 million from $24.2 million in the year ended June 30, 2013. Revenue from license and milestone fees for the year ended June 30, 2012 was $9.2 million. Included in license and milestone fees for the year ended June 30, 2014 is $7.8 million of license revenue earned upon the execution of a development and commercialization license by Lilly, two $5 million regulatory milestones achieved under our collaboration agreement with Roche, $18.2 million of license revenue earned upon the execution of two development and commercialization licenses and a one-year extension of the original term of the multi-target agreement by Novartis, and $2.2 million of revenue from Amgen related to a modification of an existing arrangement. Included in license and milestone fees for the year ended June 30, 2013 was a $10.5 million regulatory milestone achieved under our collaboration agreement with Roche, a $500,000 development milestone achieved under our collaboration agreement with Sanofi and $11.1 million of license revenue earned upon the execution of a development and commercialization license by Novartis. Included in license and milestone fees for the year ended June 30, 2012 was a $3 million milestone payment related to the initiation of Phase II clinical testing of SAR3419 achieved under our collaboration agreement with Sanofi and two $1 million milestone payments related to regulatory milestones achieved under our license agreements with Amgen. Also during the year ended June 30, 2012, Biogen Idec terminated its exclusive license to our ADC technology to develop and commercialize therapeutic compounds to the target Cripto and as a result, we recognized the remaining $270,000 of the $1 million upfront fee received from Biogen Idec upon execution of the license which had been previously deferred. Also, during fiscal 2012, we made a change in the estimate of our period of substantial involvement as it relates to our exclusive license with Bayer HealthCare which resulted in an increase to license and milestone fees of $1.2 million for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012 compared to amounts that would have been recognized pursuant to our previous estimate. The amount of license and milestone fees we earn is directly related to the number of our collaborators, the collaborators' advancement of the product candidates, and the overall success in the clinical trials of the product candidates. As such, the amount of license and milestone fees may vary widely from quarter to quarter and year to year. Total revenue recognized from license

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and milestone fees from each of our collaborative partners in the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 is included in the following table (in thousands):

Year Ended June 30, License and Milestone Fees 2014 2013 2012 Collaborative Partner: Amgen $ 2,351$ 883$ 3,118 Bayer HealthCare - 521 1,839 Biogen Idec - - 270 Biotest 25 25 120 Lilly 7,830 - - Novartis 18,353 11,131 - Roche 10,000 10,500 - Sanofi 896 1,167 3,795 Other - - 19 Total $ 39,455$ 24,227$ 9,161



Deferred revenue of $61.3 million at June 30, 2014 represents payments received from our collaborators pursuant to our license agreements which we have yet to earn pursuant to our revenue recognition policy. Included within this amount is $13.1 million of non-cash consideration recorded in connection with our arrangement with CytomX.

In February 2013, the US FDA granted marketing approval to Kadcyla, a product resulting from one of our development and commercialization licenses with Roche, through its Genentech unit. We receive royalty reports and payments related to sales of Kadcyla from Roche one quarter in arrears. In accordance with our revenue recognition policy, $10.3 million of royalties on net sales of Kadcyla for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2014 were recorded and included in royalty revenue for the year ended June 30, 2014. We recorded $592,000 of royalties on net sales of Kadcyla for the three-month period ended March 31, 2013 in our fourth quarter of fiscal 2013. No royalty revenue was recorded in fiscal year 2012. We expect royalty revenue to increase in future periods as the underlying net sales of Kadcyla increase.

Research and development support revenue was $7.2 million for the year ended June 30, 2014, $7.9 million for the year ended June 30, 2013, and $4.5 million for the year ended June 30, 2012. These amounts primarily represent research funding earned based on actual resources utilized under our agreements with our collaborators as shown in the table below. Also included in research and development support revenue are fees for developing antibody- specific conjugation processes on behalf of our collaborators and potential collaborators during the early evaluation and preclinical testing stages of drug development. The amount of research and development support revenue we earn is directly related to the number of our collaborators and potential collaborators, the stage of development of our collaborators' product candidates and the resources our collaborators allocate to the development effort. As such, the amount of development fees may vary widely from quarter to quarter and year to year. Total revenue recognized from research and development support from each

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of our collaborative partners in the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 is included in the following table (in thousands):

Year Ended June 30, Research and Development Support 2014 2013 2012 Collaborative Partner: Amgen $ 404$ 417$ 1,011 Biotest 783 921 627 Lilly 2,906 806 250 Novartis 3,012 5,605 2,588 Other 82 124 41 Total $ 7,187$ 7,873$ 4,517



Clinical materials revenue increased by approximately $65,000 to $2.9 million in the year ended June 30, 2014 compared to $2.8 million in the year ended June 30, 2013. We earned clinical materials revenue of $2.7 million during the year ended June 30, 2012. During the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, we shipped clinical materials in support of a number of our collaborators' clinical trials, as well as preclinical materials in support of certain collaborators' development efforts and DMx shipments to certain collaborators in support of development and manufacturing efforts. We are compensated at negotiated prices which are generally consistent with what other third-parties would charge. The amount of clinical materials revenue we earn, and the related cost of clinical materials charged to research and development expense, is directly related to the number of clinical trials our collaborators who use us to manufacture clinical materials are preparing or have underway, the speed of enrollment in those trials, the dosage schedule of each clinical trial and the time period, if any, during which patients in the trial receive clinical benefit from the clinical materials, and the demand our collaborators have for clinical-grade material for process development and analytical purposes. As such, the amount of clinical materials revenue and the related cost of clinical materials charged to research and development expense may vary significantly from quarter to quarter and year to year.

Research and Development Expenses

Our research and development expenses relate to (i) research to evaluate new targets and to develop and evaluate new antibodies, linkers and cytotoxic agents, (ii) preclinical testing of our own and, in certain instances, our collaborators' product candidates, and the cost of our own clinical trials, (iii) development related to clinical and commercial manufacturing processes and (iv) manufacturing operations which also includes raw materials. Our research and development efforts have been primarily focused in the following areas:

º • º evaluation of potential antigen targets; º • º evaluation of internally developed and/or in-licensed product candidates and technologies; º • º development and evaluation of additional cytotoxic agents and linkers; º • º activities related to the process, preclinical and clinical development of our internal product candidates; º • º process improvements to our ADC technology; º • º process improvements related to the production of DM1, DM4 and strain development of their precursor, ansamitocin P3; º • º operation and maintenance of our conjugate manufacturing facility, including production of our own and our collaborators' clinical materials; 54



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Table of Contents º • º production costs for the supply of antibody for our internal product candidates, including fill/finish services; º • º production costs for the supply of DMx for our and our partners' preclinical and clinical activities; º • º non-pivotal and pivotal development activities with contract manufacturers for the antibody component of our internal product candidates, linkers, and DM1, DM4 and their precursor, ansamitocin P3; and º • º activities pursuant to our development and license agreements with various collaborators.



Research and development expense for the year ended June 30, 2014 increased $19.9 million to $107.0 million from $87.1 million for the year ended June 30, 2013. Research and development expense was $69.2 million for the year ended June 30, 2012. During the year ended June 30, 2014, we recorded a $12.8 million non-cash charge to research and development expense for technology rights obtained under the collaboration agreement executed with CytomX in January 2014. Research and development salaries and related expenses increased by $8.3 million to $47.6 million in the year ended June 30, 2014 compared to the year ended June 30, 2013 and increased by $6.2 million in the year ended June 30, 2013 compared to the year ended June 30, 2012. The average number of our research personnel increased to 250 for the year ended June 30, 2014 compared to 226 for the year ended June 30, 2013. We had an average of 207 for the year ended June 30, 2012. Included in salaries and related expenses for the year ended June 30, 2014 is $10.3 million of stock compensation costs compared to $7.3 million and $5.3 million of stock compensation costs for fiscal years 2013 and 2012, respectively. The higher stock compensation costs in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 are driven by higher stock prices and increases in the number of annual options granted due to increases in personnel.

We are unable to accurately estimate which potential product candidates, if any, will eventually move into our internal preclinical research program. We are unable to reliably estimate the costs to develop these products as a result of the uncertainties related to discovery research efforts as well as preclinical and clinical testing. Our decision to move a product candidate into the clinical development phase is predicated upon the results of preclinical tests. We cannot accurately predict which, if any, of the discovery stage product candidates will advance from preclinical testing and move into our internal clinical development program. The clinical trial and regulatory approval processes for our product candidates that have advanced or that we intend to advance to clinical testing are lengthy, expensive and uncertain in both timing and outcome. As a result, the pace and timing of the clinical development of our product candidates is highly uncertain and may not ever result in approved products. Completion dates and development costs will vary significantly for each product candidate and are difficult to predict. A variety of factors, many of which are outside our control, could cause or contribute to the prevention or delay of the successful completion of our clinical trials, or delay or prevent our obtaining necessary regulatory approvals. The costs to take a product through clinical trials are dependent upon, among other factors, the clinical indications, the timing, size and design of each clinical trial, the number of patients enrolled in each trial, and the speed at which patients are enrolled and treated. Product candidates may be found to be ineffective or to cause unacceptable side effects during clinical trials, may take longer to progress through clinical trials than anticipated, may fail to receive necessary regulatory approvals or may prove impractical to manufacture in commercial quantities at reasonable cost or with acceptable quality.

The lengthy process of securing FDA approvals for new drugs requires the expenditure of substantial resources. Any failure by us to obtain, or any delay in obtaining, regulatory approvals, would materially adversely affect our product development efforts and our business overall. Accordingly, we cannot currently estimate, with any degree of certainty, the amount of time or money that we will be required to expend in the future on our product candidates prior to their regulatory approval, if such approval is ever granted. As a result of these uncertainties surrounding the timing and outcome of our

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clinical trials, we are currently unable to estimate when, if ever, our product candidates that have advanced into clinical testing will generate revenues and cash flows.

We do not track our research and development costs by project. Since we use our research and development resources across multiple research and development projects, we manage our research and development expenses within each of the categories listed in the following table and described in more detail below (in thousands):

Year Ended June 30, Research and Development Expense 2014 2013 2012 Research $ 30,793$ 17,506$ 16,827 Preclinical and Clinical Testing 34,562 27,839 21,143 Process and Product Development 8,296 7,777 7,203 Manufacturing Operations 33,307 33,951 24,019 Total Research and Development Expense $ 106,958$ 87,073$ 69,192



Research-Research includes expenses associated with activities to evaluate new targets and to develop and evaluate new antibodies, linkers and cytotoxic agents for our products and in support of our collaborators. Such expenses primarily include personnel, fees to in-license certain technology, facilities and lab supplies. Research expenses increased $13.3 million to $30.8 million in fiscal year 2014 from fiscal year 2013 and $679,000 to $17.5 million in fiscal year 2013 from fiscal year 2012. This increase in fiscal year 2014 was principally due to a $12.8 million non-cash charge recorded for technology rights obtained under the collaboration agreement executed with CytomX in January 2014 and to a lesser extent, an increase in salaries and related expenses. The increase in fiscal 2013 was principally due to an increase in salaries and related expenses.

Preclinical and Clinical Testing-Preclinical and clinical testing includes expenses related to preclinical testing of our own and, in certain instances, our collaborators' product candidates, regulatory activities, and the cost of our own clinical trials. Such expenses include personnel, patient enrollment at our clinical testing sites, consultant fees, contract services, and facility expenses. Preclinical and clinical testing expenses increased $6.8 million to $34.6 million in fiscal year 2014 from fiscal year 2013 and $6.7 million to $27.8 million in fiscal year 2013 from fiscal year 2012. The increase in fiscal year 2014 was principally the result of higher salaries and related expenses driven by an increase in personnel and higher stock compensation costs. The increase in fiscal year 2013 was primarily the result of an increase in clinical trial costs due primarily to site expansion and higher patient enrollment for the IMGN901 007 Phase II study for small-cell lung cancer and increased costs incurred for the IMGN853 Phase I trial for ovarian cancer which was initiated during the second half of fiscal 2012 and began enrolling patients in fiscal 2013, as well as an increase in salaries and related expenses.

Process and Product Development-Process and product development expenses include costs for development of clinical and commercial manufacturing processes for our own and collaborator compounds. Such expenses include the costs of personnel, contract services and facility expenses. Total development expenses increased $519,000 to $8.3 million in fiscal year 2014 from fiscal year 2013 and expenses increased $574,000 to $7.8 million in fiscal year 2013 from fiscal year 2012. The increase in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 was primarily the result of an increase in salaries and related expenses, as well as an increase in contract service expense in fiscal 2014 driven primarily by development activities for IMGN779.

Manufacturing Operations-Manufacturing operations expense includes costs to manufacture preclinical and clinical materials for our own and our collaborators' product candidates, quality control and quality assurance activities and costs to support the operation and maintenance of our conjugate manufacturing facility. Such expenses include personnel, raw materials for our and our collaborators'

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preclinical studies and clinical trials, non-pivotal and pivotal development costs with contract manufacturing organizations, manufacturing supplies, and facilities expense. Manufacturing operations expense decreased $644,000 to $33.3 million in fiscal year 2014 from fiscal year 2013 and increased $10 million to $34 million in fiscal year 2013 from fiscal year 2012. The decrease in fiscal year 2014 was primarily the result of (i) a decrease in antibody development and supply expense driven primarily by supply required in prior year for our IMGN289 and IMGN901 programs, as well as pivotal activities performed for our IMGN901 program during the prior year, partially offset by non-pivotal activities performed and supply required for our IMGN779 program during the current year; (ii) a decrease in fill/finish costs due primarily to costs to transfer our internal programs to a new supplier during the prior year period; and (iii) an increase in costs capitalized into inventory due to a greater number of manufactured batches of conjugated materials on behalf of our collaborators. Partially offsetting these decreases, salaries and related expenses increased during the current period and contract service expense increased due primarily to increased study activities related to our cytotoxic agents. The increase in fiscal year 2013 was primarily the result of (i) an increase in antibody development and supply expense driven by our IMGN901, IMGN853, IMGN529 and IMGN289 programs; (ii) a decrease in costs capitalized into inventory due to a lower number of manufactured batches of conjugated materials on behalf of our collaborators; and (iii) an increase in salaries and related expenses.

Antibody development and supply expense in anticipation of potential future clinical trials, as well as our ongoing trials, was $7.2 million in fiscal year 2014, $10.8 million in fiscal year 2013, and $4.9 million in fiscal year 2012. The process of antibody production is lengthy due in part to the lead time to establish a satisfactory production process at a vendor. Accordingly, costs incurred related to antibody production and development have fluctuated from period to period and we expect these cost fluctuations to continue in the future.

We expect that future research and development expenses will increase due to our continuing advancement of our internal product candidates through clinical trials, as well as expected increases in salaries and related expenses.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses for the year ended June 30, 2014 increased $3.0 million to $24.5 million from $21.5 million for the year ended June 30, 2013. General and administrative expenses for the year ended June 30, 2012 were $20.4 million. The increase in fiscal year 2014 was primarily due to an increase in salaries and related expenses, particularly stock compensation costs, as well as an increase in professional service fees, particularly consulting fees and patent expenses. The increase in fiscal year 2013 was primarily due to an increase in salaries and related expenses, particularly stock compensation costs. We expect general and administrative expenses to increase in fiscal 2015 compared to fiscal 2014 due primarily to increases in salaries and related expenses and patent expenses.

Investment Income, net

Investment income for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was $44,000, $126,000 and $66,000, respectively.

Other Income (Expense), net

Other income (expense), net for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was $123,000, $72,000 and $(128,000), respectively. During the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, we recorded net gains (losses) on foreign currency forward contracts of $2,000, $197,000 and $(173,000), respectively. We incurred $120,000, $(153,000), and $17,000 in foreign currency exchange gains and (losses) related to obligations with non-U.S. dollar-based suppliers and Euro cash balances maintained to fulfill them during the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of June 30, 2014 2013 (In thousands) Cash and cash equivalents $ 142,261$ 194,960 Working capital 129,502 181,511 Shareholders' equity 75,699 121,847 Year Ended June 30, 2014 2013 2012 (In thousands) Cash used for operating activities $ (53,650 )$ (60,299 )$ (34,288 ) Cash used for investing activities (8,185 ) (3,696 ) (2,968 ) Cash provided by financing activities 9,136 98,017 6,988



Cash Flows

We require cash to fund our operating expenses, including the advancement of our own clinical programs, and to make capital expenditures. Historically, we have funded our cash requirements primarily through equity financings in public markets and payments from our collaborators, including license fees, milestones, research funding and more recently, royalties. As of June 30, 2014, we had approximately $142.3 million in cash and cash equivalents. Net cash used for operating activities was $53.7 million, $60.3 million and $34.3 million during the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The principal use of cash in operating activities for all periods presented was to fund our net loss, adjusted for non-cash items. Cash used for operating activities in fiscal 2012 benefited from the $20 million upfront payment received from Lilly in January 2012 with the execution of a right- to-test agreement between the companies.

Net cash used for investing activities was $8.2 million, $3.7 million and $3.0 million for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, and substantially represents cash outflows from capital expenditures. Capital expenditures were $8.2 million, $3.8 million and $2.9 million for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Capital expenditures for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 consisted primarily of leasehold improvements to the laboratory and office space at our corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility, laboratory equipment and computer software applications.

Net cash provided by financing activities was $9.1 million, $98.0 million and $7.0 million for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, which includes the proceeds from the exercise of 1.1 million, 666,000 and 1.4 million stock options, respectively. Also, pursuant to public offerings, in fiscal 2013, we issued and sold 6,250,000 shares of our common stock resulting in net proceeds of $94.0 million.

We anticipate that our current capital resources and expected future collaborator payments under existing collaborations will enable us to meet our operational expenses and capital expenditures partway through fiscal year 2016. However, we cannot provide assurance that such collaborative agreement funding will, in fact, be received. Should we or our partners not meet some or all of the terms and conditions of our various collaboration agreements, we may be required to pursue additional strategic partners, secure alternative financing arrangements, and/or defer or limit some or all of our research, development and/or clinical projects.

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Contractual Obligations

Below is a table that presents our contractual obligations and commercial commitments as of June 30, 2014 (in thousands):

Payments Due by Period Less than 1-3 4-5 More than Total One Year Years Years 5 Years Waltham lease obligations(1) $ 73,751$ 6,077$ 11,653$ 12,134$ 43,887 Other operating lease obligations 4,432 1,073 2,212 1,147 - Total $ 78,183$ 7,150$ 13,865$ 13,281$ 43,887



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º (1) º Lease agreements were signed in July 2007, April 2012 and April 2013, and amended in December 2013 and April 2014. In December 2009, we entered into a sublease for 14,100 square feet of our office and laboratory space at 830 Winter Street, Waltham, MA through January 2015. We will receive approximately $408,000 in minimum rental payments over the remaining term of the sublease, which is not included in the table above.



In addition to the above table, we are contractually obligated to make future success-based development, regulatory or sales milestone payments in conjunction with certain collaborative agreements. These payments are contingent upon the occurrence of certain future events and, given the nature of these events, it is unclear when, if ever, we may be required to pay such amounts. Therefore, the timing of any future payment is not reasonably estimable. As a result, these contingent payments have not been included in the table above or recorded in our consolidated financial statements.

As of June 30, 2014, the maximum amount that may be payable in the future under our current collaborative agreements is $162 million, $1.4 million of which is reimbursable by a third party under a separate agreement.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2014-9, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), to clarify the principles for recognizing revenue. This update provides a comprehensive new revenue recognition model that requires revenue to be recognized in a manner to depict the transfer of goods or services to a customer at an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received in exchange for those goods or services. This guidance is effective for annual reporting and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2016 and allows for either full retrospective or modified retrospective application, with early adoption not permitted. Accordingly, the standard is effective for us on July 1, 2017. We are currently evaluating the adoption method we will apply and the impact that this guidance will have on our financial statements and related disclosures.

In July 2013, the FASB issued guidance to address the diversity in practice related to the financial statement presentation of unrecognized tax benefits as either a reduction of a deferred tax asset or a liability when a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward exists. This guidance is effective prospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

None.

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