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Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Target Escherichia Coli (Anisotropic core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic nanoparticles and the effect of the immunomagnetic...

September 2, 2014



Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Target Escherichia Coli (Anisotropic core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic nanoparticles and the effect of the immunomagnetic separation volume on the capture efficiency)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Fresh data on Proteobacteria are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Berlin, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The aim of this study was to synthesize in high product yield of anisotropic core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic nanoparticles and to investigate the effect of the immunomagnetic separation (IMS) volume on the capture efficiency. For these purposes and for the first time, we synthesized polyhedral magnetic nanoparticles composed of Fe3O4 core Au shell."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Helmholtz-Zentrum, "To synthesize magnetic gold anisotropic core-shell particles, the seed-mediated synthetic method was carried out. By choosing an appropriate amount of iron particles and growth solution the fine control of the seed-mediated approach is enabled. This led to the high product yield of anisotropic nanoparticles. The magnetic separation of these nanoparticles was easily accomplished, and the resulting nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), near edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Additionally, the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were examined. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were modified with antibody and interacted with Escherichia coli (E. coli). The high capture efficiency between the magnetic nanoparticles and E. coli is evidenced by SEM images. The capture efficiency decreases with an increase of volumes, and the highest capture efficiency was observed for E. coli in an experiment volume of 100 L for magnetic nanoparticles."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The percentage of captured E. coli for polyhedral nanoparticles was found to be approximately 95 % and for spherical nanoparticles 88 %, respectively."

For more information on this research see: Anisotropic core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic nanoparticles and the effect of the immunomagnetic separation volume on the capture efficiency. Pure and Applied Chemistry, 2014;86(6):967-978. Pure and Applied Chemistry can be contacted at: Walter De Gruyter Gmbh, Genthiner Strasse 13, D-10785 Berlin, Germany (see also Proteobacteria).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A. Zengin, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat Energie, Inst Soft Matter & Funct Mat, D-12489 Berlin, Germany. Additional authors for this research include A. Bozkurt, I.H. Boyaci, S. Ozcan, P. Daniel, F. Lagarde, A. Gibaud, D. Cetin, Z. Suludere, P. Guttmann and U. Tamer.

Keywords for this news article include: Berlin, Europe, Germany, Escherichia, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Enterobacteriaceae, Gammaproteobacteria, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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