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New Nucleoproteins Study Results Reported from Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Engineering chromatin states: Chemical and synthetic biology...

September 2, 2014



New Nucleoproteins Study Results Reported from Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Engineering chromatin states: Chemical and synthetic biology approaches to investigate histone modification function)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in Proteins. According to news reporting originating in Lausanne, Switzerland, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Patterns of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and DNA modifications establish a landscape of chromatin states with regulatory impact on gene expression, cell differentiation and development. These diverse modifications are read out by effector protein complexes, which ultimately determine their functional outcome by modulating the activity state of underlying genes."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, "From genome-wide studies employing high-throughput ChIP-Seq methods as well as proteomic mass spectrometry studies, a large number of PTMs are known and their coexistence patterns and associations with genomic regions have been mapped in a large number of different cell types. Conversely, the molecular interplay between chromatin effector proteins and modified chromatin regions as well as their resulting biological output is less well understood on a molecular level. Within the last decade a host of chemical approaches has been developed with the goal to produce synthetic chromatin with a defined arrangement of PTMs. These methods now permit systematic functional studies of individual histone and DNA modifications, and additionally provide a discovery platform to identify further interacting nuclear proteins. Complementary chemical- and synthetic-biology methods have emerged to directly observe and modulate the modification landscape in living cells and to readily probe the effect of altered PTM patterns on biological processes."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Herein, we review current methodologies allowing chemical and synthetic biological engineering of distinct chromatin states in vitro and in vivo with the aim of obtaining a molecular understanding of histone and DNA modification function."

For more information on this research see: Engineering chromatin states: Chemical and synthetic biology approaches to investigate histone modification function. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta-Gene Regulatory Mechanisms, 2014;1839(8):644-656. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta-Gene Regulatory Mechanisms can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands (see also Proteins).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H. Pick, Ecole Polytechnic Fed Lausanne, Fdn Sandoz Chair Biophys Chem Macromol, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. Additional authors for this research include S. Kilic and B. Fierz.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Lausanne, Histones, Chromatin, Switzerland, Engineering, Nucleoproteins, Intranuclear Space, Chromosome Structures, Cell Nucleus Structures

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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