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New Findings from University of Nantes in Medical Technology Provides New Insights (Correlation between primary stability and bone healing of surface...

September 5, 2014



New Findings from University of Nantes in Medical Technology Provides New Insights (Correlation between primary stability and bone healing of surface treated titanium implants in the femoral epiphyses of rabbits)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Health and Medicine. According to news reporting originating in Nantes, France, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The aim of this study was to analyse the stability and osseointegration of surface treated titanium implants in rabbit femurs. The implants were either grit-blasted and acid-etched (BE Group), calcium phosphate (CaP) coated by using the electrodeposition technique, or had bioactive molecules incorporated into the CaP coatings: either cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or dexamethasone (Dex)."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Nantes, "Twenty four cylindrical titanium implants (n = 6/group) were inserted bilaterally into the femoral epiphyses of New Zealand White, female, adult rabbits for 4 weeks. Implant stability was measured by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) the day of implantation and 4 weeks later, and correlated to histomorphometric parameters, bone implant contact (BIC) and bone growth around the implants (BS/TS 0.5 mm). The BIC values for the four groups were not significantly different. That said, histology indicated that the CaP coatings improved bone growth around the implants. The incorporation of bioactive molecules (cAMP and Dex) into the CaP coatings did not improve bone growth compared to the BE group. Implant stability quotients (ISQ) increased in each group after 4 weeks of healing but were not significantly different between the groups. A good correlation was observed between ISQ and BS/TS 0.5 mm indicating that RFA is a non-invasive method that can be used to assess the osseointegration of implants."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The CaP coating enhanced bone formation around the implants, which was correlated to stability measured by resonance frequency analysis. Furthers studies need to be conducted in order to explore the benefits of incorporating bioactive molecules into the coatings for peri-implant bone healing."

For more information on this research see: Correlation between primary stability and bone healing of surface treated titanium implants in the femoral epiphyses of rabbits. Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine, 2014;25(8):1941-1951. Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands (see also Health and Medicine).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Roze, Univ Nantes, Lab Pathophysiol Bone Resorpt, INSERM, Fac MedU957, F-44035 Nantes, France. Additional authors for this research include A. Hoornaert and P. Layrolle.

Keywords for this news article include: Nantes, France, Europe, Titanium, Light Metals, Health and Medicine

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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