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New Findings from Biotechnology Research Institute in the Area of Life Science Research Described (Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for...

September 2, 2014



New Findings from Biotechnology Research Institute in the Area of Life Science Research Described (Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- A new study on Life Science Research is now available. According to news reporting from Beijing, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Biotechnology Research Institute, "Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow."

For more information on this research see: Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum. Plos One, 2014;9(6):e99651. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X.J. Wang, Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include X. Jin, B.Q. Dun, N. Kong, S.R. Jia, Q.L. Tang and Z.X Wang (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Beijing, Technology, Life Science Research, People's Republic of China.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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