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Investigators from Natural History Museum Have Reported New Data on Amphibian Research (Distribution and hybridization of Anguis fragilis and A....

September 2, 2014



Investigators from Natural History Museum Have Reported New Data on Amphibian Research (Distribution and hybridization of Anguis fragilis and A. colchica in Hungary)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Fresh data on Life Science Research are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Budapest, Hungary, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Slow worms (Anguis spp.) are widely distributed in Europe. Based on pronounced divergences in molecular markers the subspecies of the slow worm, Anguis fragilis, have been recently elevated to species level."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Natural History Museum, "In Hungary both A. fragilis and A. colchica are present in the mountainous areas with their range being separated by the Danube River with potential contact zones in the Danube valley. Based on morphology, hybridization of the two taxa has been described earlier from the Budai and Pilis Mountains. In order to reveal the exact distribution and confirm hybridization of Anguis taxa in Hungary we analyzed fragments of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear (Rag1) genes in 36 specimens from eight regions of Hungary and adjacent countries."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The results confirmed the previously known distribution pattern with an east-west split along the Danube River and supported the morphological findings about hybridization in the Budai and Pilis Mountains."

For more information on this research see: Distribution and hybridization of Anguis fragilis and A. colchica in Hungary. Amphibia-Reptilia, 2014;35(1):135-140. Amphibia-Reptilia can be contacted at: Brill Academic Publishers, Plantijnstraat 2, P O Box 9000, 2300 Pa Leiden, Netherlands (see also Life Science Research).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K. Szabo, Hungarian Nat Hist Museum, Dept. of Zool, H-1088 Budapest, Hungary.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Hungary, Budapest, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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