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Fukuyama University Details Findings in Nanoparticles (Nanoparticles of hydrophobized cluster dextrin as biodegradable drug carriers: solubilization...

September 5, 2014



Fukuyama University Details Findings in Nanoparticles (Nanoparticles of hydrophobized cluster dextrin as biodegradable drug carriers: solubilization and encapsulation of amphotericin B)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Drug Week -- A new study on Nanoparticles is now available. According to news reporting originating from Hiroshima, Japan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Cluster dextrin (CDex), a highly branched cyclic dextrin, is a novel glucose polymer that is produced from a waxy corn starch by a branching enzyme. Despite its large molecular weight (462 kDa),CDex is highly water-soluble and is easily digested by enzymes, such as alpha-amylase."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Fukuyama University, "Amphotericin B (AmB) is a broad-spectrum fungicidal antibiotic used primarily in the treatment of life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Unfortunately. AmB is insoluble in water: therefore, we have attempted to render it soluble and transportable by encapsulating it in hydrophobized CDex nanoparticles. The amphiphilic polymers of CDex were prepared with hydrophobic groups bonded through ester bonds, and the degrees of substitution were 1.00 mol/mol % for n-octanoyl CDex, 1.80 mol/mol % for stearoyl CDex, 1.07 mol/mol % for oleoyl CDex, and 1.07 moll mol % for cholesteryl CDex. To study the formation of the monodispersed nanoparticles of the hydrophobized CDexs by self-assembly and their complex formations with AmB, size-exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering were utilized. AmB encapsulated in the cholesteryl CDex nanoparticle was found to be non-hemolytic, even at 30 mu g/mL, which suggested that it had a much higher concentration than the minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.78 mu g/mL required to inhibit Saccharomyces cerevisiae Therefore, the biodistributions of the AmB-loaded cholesteryl CDex nanoparticles and AmBisome (liposomal AmB) were further compared in mice."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "After intravenous injection of the AmB-loaded cholesteryl CDex nanoparticle, prolonged persistence of AmB in the circulating blood was observed."

For more information on this research see: Nanoparticles of hydrophobized cluster dextrin as biodegradable drug carriers: solubilization and encapsulation of amphotericin B. Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology, 2014;24(4):344-351. Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology can be contacted at: Editions Sante, 47 Rue Galilee, 75116 Paris, France (see also Nanoparticles).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Kaneo, Fukuyama Univ, Fac Pharm & Pharmaceut Sci, Lab Biopharmaceut, Fukuyama, Hiroshima 7290292, Japan. Additional authors for this research include K. Taguchi, T. Tanaka and S. Yamamoto.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Japan, Hiroshima, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Drug Week


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