News Column

JDS UNIPHASE CORP /CA/ - 10-K - MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

August 26, 2014

Our Industries and Developments

JDSU is a leading provider of network and service enablement solutions and optical products for telecommunications service providers, wireless operators, cable operators, NEMs and enterprises. JDSU is also an established leader in providing anti-counterfeiting technologies for currencies and other high-value documents and products. In addition, we leverage our core networking and optical technology expertise to deliver high-powered commercial lasers for manufacturing applications and expand into emerging markets, including 3D sensing solutions for consumer electronics. In the first quarter of fiscal 2014, we changed the name of our Communication Test and Measurement segment to Network and Service Enablement. The name NSE more accurately reflects the value the Company brings to customers and the evolution of the Company's product portfolio, one that includes communications test instruments as well as microprobes, software and services that provide the necessary visibility throughout the network to improve service and application performance. To serve its markets, JDSU operates the following business segments: º • º Network and Service Enablement º • º Communications and Commercial Optical Products º • º Optical Security and Performance Products In July 2014, we reorganized our NSE reportable segment into two separate reportable segments, Network Enablement and Service Enablement, beginning with the first quarter of fiscal 2015. Splitting NSE into two reportable segments is intended to provide greater clarity and transparency regarding the markets, financial performance and business models of these two businesses within NSE. NE is a hardware-centric and more mature business consisting primarily of NSE's traditional communications test instrument products. SE is a more software-centric business consisting primarily of software solutions that are embedded within the network and enterprise performance management solutions.



Network and Service Enablement

NSE provides an integrated portfolio of network and service enablement solutions that provide end-to-end visibility and intelligence necessary for consistent, high-quality network, service and application performance.

These solutions are made up of lab and field test instruments and customer experience management solutions ("CEM") supported by microprobes, monitoring software and optimization applications. This portfolio helps network operators and service providers effectively manage the continued growth of network traffic, devices and applications. As a result of this continued growth, operators and providers are looking for new ways to drive business agility and generate revenue with innovative services, while continuing to focus on reducing operating costs and improving performance. To this end, NSE is focused on providing world-class network and service enablement solutions, focusing investments on software and solutions offerings in high-growth markets while leveraging its instruments portfolio. These strategic investments are being placed globally to meet end-customer demand. JDSU's network enablement solutions include instruments and software to build, activate, certify, troubleshoot, monitor and optimize networks that are differentiated through superior efficiency, higher profitability, reliable performance and greater customer satisfaction. These products include instruments and software that access the network to perform installation and maintenance tasks. Our service enablement solutions collect and analyze complete network data to reveal the actual customer 33



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

experience and opportunities for new revenue streams with enhanced management, control, optimization and differentiation.

NSE solutions address lab and production environments, field deployment and service assurance for wireless and fixed communications networks, including storage networks. NSE's solutions include one of the largest test instrument portfolios in the industry, with hundreds of thousands of units in active use by major NEMs, operators and services providers worldwide. NSE is leveraging this installed base and knowledge of network management methods and procedures to develop advanced customer experience solutions. These solutions enable carriers to remotely monitor performance and quality of service and applications performance throughout the entire network. Remote monitoring decreases operating expenses, while early detection increases uptime, preserves revenue and enables operators to better monetize their networks. NSE customers include wireless and fixed services providers, NEMs, government organizations and large corporate customers. These include major telecom, mobility and cable operators such as AT&T, Bell Canada, Bharti Airtel Limited, British Telecom, China Mobile, China Telecom, Chunghwa Telecom, Comcast, CSL, Deutsche Telecom, France Telecom, Reliance Communications, Softbank, TelefÓnica, Telmex, TimeWarner Cable, Verizon and Vodafone. NSE customers also include many of the NEMs served by our CCOP segment, including Alcatel-Lucent, Ciena, Cisco Systems, Fujitsu and Huawei. NSE customers also include chip and infrastructure vendors, storage-device manufacturers, storage-network and switch vendors, and deployed private enterprise customers. Storage-segment customers include Brocade, Cisco Systems and EMC. During the second quarter of fiscal 2014, we acquired certain technology and other assets from Trendium, a provider of real-time intelligence solutions for customer experience assurance, asset optimization, and monetization of big data for 4G/Long term evolution mobile network operators. During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we acquired Network Instruments, a leading developer of enterprise network and application-performance management solutions for global 2000 companies. Network Instruments extended JDSU's service enablement solutions to the enterprise, data center and cloud networking markets.



Communications and Commercial Optical Products

CCOP is a leading provider of optical communications and commercial laser products and technologies and commercial laser components.

Serving telecommunications and enterprise data communications markets, CCOP products include components, modules, subsystems and solutions for access (local), metro (intracity), long-haul (city-to-city and worldwide) and submarine (undersea) networks, as well as SANs, LANs and WANs. These products enable the transmission and transport of video, audio and text data over high-capacity fiber-optic cables. CCOP maintains leading positions in the fastest-growing optical communications segments, including ROADMs and tunable XFPs and SFP+s. CCOP's growing portfolio of pluggable transceivers supports LAN/SAN needs and the cloud for customers building proprietary data center networks. OEMs use CCOP lasers-fiber, diode, direct-diode, diode-pumped solid-state and gas-that offer low- to high-power output with UV, visible and IR wavelengths. This broad product portfolio addresses the needs of laser clients in applications such as micromachining, materials processing, bio-instrumentation, consumer electronics, graphics, and medical/dental. Core laser technologies include continuous-wave, q-switched and mode-locked lasers addressing application needs from continuous-wave to megahertz repetition rates. Photonic power products transport energy over optical fiber, enabling electromagnetic- and radio-interference-free power and data transmission for remote sensors such as high-voltage line current monitors. 34



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

3D sensing systems use both CCOP's light source and OSP's optical filters. These systems simplify the way people interact with technology by enabling the use of natural body gestures, like the wave of a hand, instead of using a device like a mouse or remote control. Emerging markets for 3D sensing include gaming platforms, home entertainment, mobile devices and personal computing. CCOP's optical communications products customers include Adva, Alcatel-Lucent, Ciena, Cisco Systems, Ericsson, Fujitsu, Huawei, Infinera, Microsoft, Nokia Networks, and Tellabs. CCOP's lasers customers include Amada, ASML, Beckman Coulter, Becton Dickinson, Disco, Electro Scientific Industries and KLA-Tencor. During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we acquired Time-Bandwidth Products, a provider of high powered and ultrafast lasers for the industrial and scientific markets. Manufacturers use high-power, ultrafast lasers to create micro parts for consumer electronics and to process semiconductor chips. Use of ultrafast lasers for micromachining applications is being driven primarily by increasing use of consumer electronics and connected devices globally.



Optical Security and Performance Products

OSP designs, manufactures, and sells products targeting anti-counterfeiting, consumer electronics, government, healthcare and other markets.

OSP's security offerings for the currency market include OVP®, OVMP® and banknote thread substrates. OVP® enables a color-shifting effect used by banknote issuers and security printers worldwide for anti-counterfeiting applications on currency and other high-value documents and products. OVP® protects the currencies of more than 100 countries today. OSP also develops and delivers overt and covert anti-counterfeiting products that utilize its proprietary printing platform and are targeted primarily at the pharmaceutical and consumer-electronics markets.



Leveraging its expertise in spectral management and its unique high-precision coating capabilities, OSP provides a range of products and technologies for the consumer-electronics market, including, for example, optical filters for 3D sensing devices designed for gaming and other platforms.

OSP value-added solutions meet the stringent requirements of commercial and government customers in aerospace and defense. JDSU products are used in a variety of aerospace and defense applications, including optics for guidance systems, laser eye protection and night vision systems. These products, including coatings and optical filters, are optimized for each specific application.



OSP serves customers such as 3M, Barco, Kingston, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Northrup Grumman, Pan Pacific, Seiko Epson and SICPA.

During the second quarter of fiscal 2013, we completed the sale of our hologram business ("Hologram Business"), which primarily addressed the transaction card market. We have presented our Consolidated Statements of Operations and segment results to reflect the sale of this business. The historical results of this business are reflected as discontinued operations in accordance with the authoritative guidance under U.S. GAAP and are excluded from our annual and quarterly results from continuing operations for all periods presented.



Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued new authoritative guidance related to revenue recognition. This guidance will replace all current U.S. GAAP guidance on this topic and eliminate all industry-specific guidance. The new revenue recognition guidance provides a unified model to determine when and how revenue is recognized. The core principle is that a company should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration for which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those 35



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

goods or services. The new guidance is effective for us in the first quarter of fiscal 2018. This guidance allows for two methods of adoption: (a) full retrospective adoption, meaning the guidance is applied to all periods presented, or (b) modified retrospective adoption, meaning the cumulative effect of applying this guidance is recognized as an adjustment to the fiscal 2018 opening Accumulated deficit balance. We are evaluating the two adoption methods as well as the impact this new guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. In April 2014, the FASB issued authoritative guidance, which specifies that only disposals, such as a disposal of a major line of business, representing a strategic shift in operations should be presented as discontinued operations. In addition, the new guidance requires expanded disclosures about discontinued operations that will provide financial statement users with more information about the assets, liabilities, income, and expenses of discontinued operations. This guidance is effective for us in the first quarter of fiscal 2016. We do not anticipate the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements, absent any disposition representing a strategic shift in our operations. In July 2013, the FASB issued authoritative guidance that requires an entity to present an unrecognized tax benefit, or a portion of an unrecognized tax benefit, in the financial statements as a reduction to a deferred tax asset for a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward, except as follows. To the extent a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward is not available at the reporting date under the tax law of the applicable jurisdiction to settle any additional income taxes that would result from the disallowance of a tax position or the tax law of the applicable jurisdiction does not require the entity to use, and the entity does not intend to use, the deferred tax asset for such purpose, the unrecognized tax benefit should be presented in the financial statements as a liability and should not be combined with deferred tax assets. This guidance is effective for us in the first quarter of fiscal 2015. We do not anticipate the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. In March 2013, FASB issued authoritative guidance that resolves the diversity in practice regarding the release into net income of the cumulative translation adjustment upon derecognition of a subsidiary or group of assets within a foreign entity. This guidance will be effective for us beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2015. We do not anticipate the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements, absent any material transactions involving the derecognition of subsidiaries or groups of assets within a foreign entity.



Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, net revenue and expenses, and the related disclosures. We base our estimates on historical experience, our knowledge of economic and market factors and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Estimates and judgments used in the preparation of our financial statements are, by their nature, uncertain and unpredictable, and depend upon, among other things, many factors outside of our control, such as demand for our products and economic conditions. Accordingly, our estimates and judgments may prove to be incorrect and actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following critical accounting policies are affected by significant estimates, assumptions and judgments used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:



Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. We consider revenue realized or realizable and earned when there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement, delivery has occurred,

36



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured. Delivery does not occur until products have been shipped or services have been provided, risk of loss has transferred and in cases where formal acceptance is required, customer acceptance has been obtained or customer acceptance provisions have lapsed. In situations where a formal acceptance is required but the acceptance only relates to whether the product meets its published specifications, revenue is recognized upon shipment provided all other revenue recognition criteria are met. The sales price is not considered to be fixed or determinable until all contingencies related to the sale have been resolved. We reduce revenue for rebates and other similar allowances. Revenue is recognized only if these estimates can be reliably determined. Our estimates are based on historical results taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specifics of each arrangement. In addition to the aforementioned general policies, the following are the specific revenue recognition policies for multiple-element arrangements and for each major category of revenue.



Multiple-Element Arrangements

When a sales arrangement contains multiple deliverables, such as sales of products that include services, the multiple deliverables are evaluated to determine whether there are one or more units of accounting. Where there is more than one unit of accounting, then the entire fee from the arrangement is allocated to each unit of accounting based on the relative selling price. Under this approach, the selling price of a unit of accounting is determined by using a selling price hierarchy which requires the use of vendor-specific objective evidence ("VSOE") of fair value if available, third-party evidence ("TPE") if VSOE is not available, or management's best estimate of selling price ("BESP") if neither VSOE nor TPE is available. Revenue is recognized when the revenue recognition criteria for each unit of accounting are met. We establish VSOE of selling price using the price charged for a deliverable when sold separately and, in remote circumstances, using the price established by management having the relevant authority. TPE of selling price is established by evaluating similar and interchangeable competitor goods or services in sales to similarly situated customers. When VSOE or TPE are not available then we use BESP. Generally, we are not able to determine TPE because our product strategy differs from that of others in our markets, and the extent of customization varies among comparable products or services from our peers. We establish BESP using historical selling price trends and considering multiple factors including, but not limited to geographies, market conditions, competitive landscape, internal costs, gross margin objectives, and pricing practices. When determining BESP, we apply significant judgment in establishing pricing strategies and evaluating market conditions and product lifecycles. The determination of BESP is made through consultation with and approval by the segment management. Segment management may modify or develop new pricing practices and strategies in the future. As these pricing strategies evolve, we may modify our pricing practices in the future, which may result in changes in BESP. The aforementioned factors may result in a different allocation of revenue to the deliverables in multiple element arrangements from the current fiscal year, which may change the pattern and timing of revenue recognition for these elements but will not change the total revenue recognized for the arrangement. To the extent a deliverable(s) in a multiple-element arrangement is subject to specific guidance (for example, software that is subject to the authoritative guidance on software revenue recognition), we allocate the fair value of the units of accounting using relative selling price and that unit of accounting is accounted for in accordance with the specific guidance. Some of our product offerings include hardware that are integrated with or sold with software that delivers the functionality of the equipment. We believe this equipment is not considered software-related and would therefore be excluded from the scope of the authoritative guidance on software revenue recognition. 37



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Hardware

Revenue from hardware sales is recognized when the product is shipped to the customer and when there are no unfulfilled company obligations that affect the customer's final acceptance of the arrangement. Any cost of warranties and remaining obligations that are inconsequential or perfunctory are accrued when the corresponding revenue is recognized.



Services

Revenue from services and system maintenance is typically recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the contract. Revenue from time and material contracts is recognized at the contractual rates as labor hours are delivered and direct expenses are incurred. Revenue related to extended warranty and product maintenance contracts is deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the delivery period. We also generate service revenue from hardware repairs and calibration which is recognized as revenue upon completion of the service. Software Our software arrangements generally consist of a perpetual license fee and Post-Contract Support ("PCS"). Where we have established VSOE of fair value for PCS contracts, it is based on the renewal rate or the bell curve methodology. Revenue from maintenance, unspecified upgrades and technical support is recognized over the period such items are delivered. In multiple-element revenue arrangements that include software, software-related and non-software-related elements are accounted for in accordance with the following policies. º • º Non-software and software-related products are bifurcated based on a relative selling price º • º Software-related products are separated into units of accounting if all of the following criteria are met: º • º The functionality of the delivered element(s) is not



dependent on

the undelivered element(s). º • º There is VSOE of fair value of the undelivered element(s). º • º Delivery of the delivered element(s) represents the



culmination

of the earnings process for that element(s). If these criteria are not met, the software revenue is deferred until the earlier of when such criteria are met or when the last undelivered element is delivered. If there is VSOE of the undelivered item(s) but no such evidence for the delivered item(s), the residual method is used to allocate the arrangement consideration. Under the residual method, the amount of consideration allocated to the delivered item(s) equals the total arrangement consideration less the aggregate VSOE of the undelivered elements. In cases where VSOE is not established for PCS, revenue is recognized ratably over the PCS period after all software elements have been delivered and the only undelivered item is PCS.



Allowances for Doubtful Accounts

We perform credit evaluations of our customers' financial condition. We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments. We record our bad debt expenses as SG&A expense. When we become aware that a specific customer is unable to meet its financial obligations to us, for example, as a result of bankruptcy or deterioration in the customer's operating results or financial position, we record a specific allowance to reflect the level of credit risk in the customer's outstanding receivable balance. In addition, we record additional allowances based on certain percentages of our aged receivable balances. These percentages 38



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

are determined by a variety of factors including, but not limited to, current economic trends, historical payment and bad debt write-off experience. We are not able to predict changes in the financial condition of our customers, and if circumstances related to our customers deteriorate, our estimates of the recoverability of our trade receivables could be materially affected and we may be required to record additional allowances. Alternatively, if we provide more allowances than we need, we may reverse a portion of such provisions in future periods based on our actual collection experience.



Stock-based Compensation

The fair value of our time-based Full Value Awards is based on the closing market price of our common stock on the grant date of the award. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the fair value of certain performance-based Full Value Awards with market conditions ("MSUs"). We estimate the fair value of employee stock purchase plan awards ("ESPP") using the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model. This option-pricing model requires the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the award's expected life and the price volatility of the underlying stock. Pursuant to the authoritative guidance, we are required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. When estimating forfeitures, we consider voluntary termination behavior as well as future workforce reduction programs. Estimated forfeiture is trued up to actual forfeiture as the equity awards vest. The total fair value of the equity awards, net of forfeiture, is recorded on a straight-line basis over the requisite service periods of the awards, which is generally the vesting period, except for MSUs which are amortized based upon a graded vesting method.



Investments

Our investments in debt securities and marketable equity securities are primarily classified as available-for-sale investments or trading securities and are recorded at fair value. The cost of securities sold is based on the specific identification method. Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale investments, net of tax, are reported as a separate component within our Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity. Unrealized gains or losses on trading securities resulting from changes in fair value are recognized in current earnings. Our short-term investments, which are classified as current assets, include certain securities with stated maturities of longer than twelve months as they are highly liquid and available to support current operations. We periodically review our investments for impairment. If a debt security's market value is below amortized cost and we either intend to sell the security or it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the security before its anticipated recovery, we record an other-than-temporary impairment charge to investment income (loss) for the entire amount of the impairment; if a debt security's market value is below amortized cost and we do not expect to recover the entire amortized cost of the security, we separate the other-than-temporary impairment into the portion of the loss related to credit factors, or the credit loss portion, and the portion of the loss that is not related to credit factors, or the non-credit loss portion. The credit loss portion is the difference between the amortized cost of the security and our best estimate of the present value of the cash flows expected to be collected from the debt security. The non-credit loss portion is the residual amount of the other-than-temporary impairment. The credit loss portion is recorded as a charge to income (loss), and the non-credit loss portion is recorded as a separate component of Other comprehensive income (loss).



Inventory Valuation

We assess the value of our inventory on a quarterly basis and write-down those inventories which are obsolete or in excess of our forecasted usage to their estimated realizable value. Our estimates of realizable value are based upon our analysis and assumptions including, but not limited to, forecasted 39



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

sales levels by product, expected product lifecycle, product development plans and future demand requirements. Our product line management personnel play a key role in our excess review process by providing updated sales forecasts, managing product transitions and working with manufacturing to maximize recovery of excess inventory. If actual market conditions are less favorable than our forecasts or actual demand from our customers is lower than our estimates, we may be required to record additional inventory write-downs. If actual market conditions are more favorable than anticipated, inventory previously written down may be sold, resulting in lower cost of sales and higher income from operations than expected in that period.



Goodwill Valuation

We test goodwill for possible impairment on an annual basis in our fourth quarter and at any other time if events occur or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of goodwill may not be recoverable. Circumstances that could trigger an impairment test include, but are not limited to: a significant adverse change in the business climate or legal factors, an adverse action or assessment by a regulator, changes in customers, target markets and strategy, unanticipated competition, loss of key personnel, or the likelihood that a reporting unit or significant portion of a reporting unit will be sold or otherwise disposed. The authoritative guidance allows an entity to assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. If an entity determines that as a result of the qualitative assessment that it is more likely than not (i.e. >50% likelihood) that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then the quantitative test is required. Otherwise, no further testing is required. The two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test requires us to estimate the fair value of our reporting units. If the carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the goodwill of that reporting unit is potentially impaired and we proceed to step two of the impairment analysis. In step two of the analysis, we measure and record an impairment loss equal to the excess of the carrying value of the reporting unit's goodwill over its implied fair value, if any. Application of the goodwill impairment test requires judgments, including: identification of the reporting units, assigning assets and liabilities to reporting units, assigning goodwill to reporting units, a qualitative assessment to determine whether there are any impairment indicators, and determining the fair value of each reporting unit. We generally estimate the fair value of a reporting unit using a combination of the income approach, which estimates the fair value based on the future discounted cash flows, and the market approach, which estimates the fair value based on comparable market prices. Our significant estimates in the income approach include: our weighted average cost of capital, long-term rate of growth and profitability of the reporting unit's business, and working capital effects. The market approach estimates the fair value of the business based on a comparison of the reporting unit to comparable publicly traded companies in similar lines of business. Significant estimates in the market approach include: identifying similar companies with comparable business factors such as size, growth, profitability, risk and return on investment, and assessing comparable revenue and operating income multiples in estimating the fair value of the reporting unit. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions about the future that we believe are reasonable based on available information. Unanticipated events and circumstances may occur that affect the accuracy of our assumptions, estimates and judgments. For example, if the price of our common stock were to significantly decrease combined with other adverse changes in market conditions, thus indicating that the underlying fair value of our reporting units may have decreased, we might be required to reassess the value of our goodwill in the period such circumstances were identified. 40



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Long-lived Asset Valuation (Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangible Assets)

Long-lived assets held and used

We test long-lived assets for recoverability, at the asset group level, when events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. Circumstances which could trigger a review include, but are not limited to: significant decreases in the market price of the asset; significant adverse changes in the business climate or legal factors; accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of the asset; current period cash flow or operating losses combined with a history of losses or a forecast of continuing losses associated with the use of the asset; and current expectation that the asset will more likely than not be sold or disposed of significantly before the end of its estimated useful life. Recoverability is assessed based on the carrying amounts of the long-lived assets or asset groups and its fair value which is generally determined based on the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and the eventual disposal of the asset, as well as specific appraisals in certain instances. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying amount is not recoverable and exceeds fair value.



Long-lived assets held for sale

Long-lived assets are classified as held for sale when certain criteria are met, which include: management commitment to a plan to sell the assets; the availability of the assets for immediate sale in their present condition; an active program to locate buyers and other actions to sell the assets has been initiated; whether the sale of the assets is probable and their transfer is expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year; whether the assets are being marketed at reasonable prices in relation to their fair value; and how unlikely it is that significant changes will be made to the plan to sell the assets.



We measure long-lived assets to be disposed of by sale at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. Fair value is determined using quoted market prices or the anticipated cash flows discounted at a rate commensurate with the risk involved.

Income Taxes

In accordance with the authoritative guidance on accounting for income taxes, we recognize income taxes using an asset and liability approach. This approach requires the recognition of taxes payable or refundable for the current year and deferred tax liabilities and assets for the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our consolidated financial statements or tax returns. The measurement of current and deferred taxes is based on provisions of the enacted tax law and the effects of future changes in tax laws or rates are not anticipated. The authoritative guidance provides for recognition of deferred tax assets if the realization of such deferred tax assets is more likely than not to occur based on an evaluation of both positive and negative evidence and the relative weight of the evidence. With the exception of certain international jurisdictions, we have determined that at this time it is more likely than not that deferred tax assets attributable to the remaining jurisdictions will not be realized, primarily due to uncertainties related to our ability to utilize our net operating loss carryforwards before they expire. Accordingly, we have established a valuation allowance for such deferred tax assets. If there is a change in our ability to realize our deferred tax assets for which a valuation allowance has been established, then our tax provision may decrease in the period in which we determine that realization is more likely than not. Likewise, if we determine that it is not more likely than not that its deferred tax assets will be realized, then a valuation allowance may be established for such deferred tax assets and our tax provision may increase in the period in which it makes the determination. 41



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

The authoritative guidance on accounting for uncertainty in income taxes clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an entity's financial statements and prescribes the recognition threshold and measurement attributes for financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. Additionally, it provides guidance on recognition, classification, and disclosure of tax positions. We are subject to income tax audits by the respective tax authorities in all of the jurisdictions in which we operate. The determination of tax liabilities in each of these jurisdictions requires the interpretation and application of complex and sometimes uncertain tax laws and regulations. We recognize liabilities based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional tax liabilities are more likely than not. If we ultimately determine that the payment of such a liability is not necessary, then we reverse the liability and recognize a tax benefit during the period in which the determination is made that the liability is no longer necessary. The recognition and measurement of current taxes payable or refundable and deferred tax assets and liabilities requires that we make certain estimates and judgments. Changes to these estimates or a change in judgment may have a material impact on our tax provision in a future period.



Restructuring Accrual

In accordance with authoritative guidance on accounting for costs associated with exit or disposal activities, generally costs associated with restructuring activities are recognized when they are incurred. However, in the case of leases, the expense is estimated and accrued when the property is vacated. Given the significance of, and the timing of the execution of such activities, this process is complex and involves periodic reassessments of estimates made from the time the property was vacated, including evaluating real estate market conditions for expected vacancy periods and sub-lease income. Additionally, a liability for post-employment benefits for workforce reductions related to restructuring activities is recorded when payment is probable, the amount is reasonably estimable, and the obligation relates to rights that have vested or accumulated. We continually evaluate the adequacy of the remaining liabilities under our restructuring initiatives. Although we believe that these estimates accurately reflect the costs of our restructuring plans, actual results may differ, thereby requiring us to record additional provisions or reverse a portion of such provisions.



Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits

The funded status of our retirement-related benefit plans is recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The funded status is measured as the difference between the fair value of plan assets and the benefit obligation at fiscal year end, the measurement date. For defined benefit pension plans, the benefit obligation is the projected benefit obligation ("PBO"); and for the non-pension postretirement benefit plan, the benefit obligation is the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation ("APBO"). The PBO represents the actuarial present value of benefits expected to be paid upon retirement. The APBO represents the actuarial present value of postretirement benefits attributed to employee services already rendered. Unfunded or partially funded plans, with the benefit obligation exceeding the fair value of plan assets, are aggregated and recorded as a retirement and non-pension postretirement benefit obligation equal to this excess. The current portion of the retirement-related benefit obligation represents the actuarial present value of benefits payable in the next 12 months in excess of the fair value of plan assets, measured on a plan-by-plan basis. This liability is recorded in Other current liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Net periodic pension cost (income) is recorded in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and includes service cost, interest cost, expected return on plan assets, amortization of prior service cost and (gains) losses previously recognized as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income. Service cost represents the actuarial present value of participant benefits attributed to services rendered by employees in the current year. Interest cost represents the time value of money cost associated with 42



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

the passage of time. (Gains) losses arise as a result of differences between actual experience and assumptions or as a result of changes in actuarial assumptions. Prior service cost (credit) represents the cost of benefit improvements attributable to prior service granted in plan amendments. (Gains) losses and prior service cost (credit) not recognized as a component of net periodic pension cost (income) in the Consolidated Statement of Operations as they arise are recognized as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income on the Consolidated Balances Sheets, net of tax. Those (gains) losses and prior service cost (credit) are subsequently recognized as a component of net periodic pension period cost (income) pursuant to the recognition and amortization provisions of the authoritative guidance. The measurement of the benefit obligation and net periodic pension cost (income) is based on our estimates and actuarial valuations, provided by third-party actuaries, which are approved by our management. These valuations reflect the terms of the plans and use participant-specific information such as compensation, age and years of service, as well as certain assumptions, including estimates of discount rates, expected return on plan assets, rate of compensation increases, and mortality rates. We evaluate these assumptions annually at a minimum. In estimating the expected return on plan assets, we consider historical returns on plan assets, adjusted for forward-looking considerations, inflation assumptions and the impact of the active management of the plan's invested assets. Loss Contingencies

We are subject to the possibility of various loss contingencies arising in the ordinary course of business. We consider the likelihood of loss or impairment of an asset or the incurrence of a liability, as well as our ability to reasonably estimate the amount of loss in determining loss contingencies. An estimated loss is accrued when it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. We regularly evaluate current information available to us to determine whether such accruals should be adjusted and whether new accruals are required. 43



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The results of operations for the current period are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for future periods. The following table summarizes selected Consolidated Statements of Operations items as a percentage of net revenue: Years Ended June 28, June 29, June 30, 2014 2013 2012 Segment net revenue: NSE 42.9 % 43.4 % 45.4 % CCOP 45.6 44.3 42.2 OSP 11.5 12.3 12.4 Net revenue 100.0 100.0 100.0 Cost of sales 52.5 54.8 54.1 Amortization of acquired technologies 2.5 3.8 3.5 Gross profit 45.0 41.4 42.4 Operating expenses: Research and development 17.0 15.4 14.7 Selling, general and administrative 25.8 25.6



25.7

Amortization of other intangibles 0.9 0.8



1.3

Restructuring and related charges 1.4 1.1 0.7 Total operating expenses 45.1 42.9 42.4 Loss from operations (0.1 ) (1.5 ) - Interest and other income (expense), net - (0.2 ) 0.8 Interest expense (1.7 ) (1.1 ) (1.6 ) Loss from continuing operations before income taxes (1.8 ) (2.8 ) (0.8 ) (Benefit from) provision for income taxes (0.8 ) (6.2 )



0.7

(Loss) income from continuing operations, net of tax (1.0 ) 3.4 (1.5 ) Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax - - (1.8 ) Net (loss) income (1.0 )% 3.4 % (3.3 )% 44



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Financial Data for Fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012

The following table summarizes selected Consolidated Statement of Operations items (in millions, except for percentages):

Percentage Percentage 2014 2013 Change Change 2013 2012 Change Change Segment net revenue: NSE $ 748.3$ 728.9$ 19.4 2.7 % $ 728.9$ 754.8$ (25.9 ) (3.4 )% CCOP 794.1 742.2 51.9 7.0 742.2 701.6 40.6 5.8 OSP 200.8 205.8 (5.0 ) (2.4 ) 205.8 206.0 (0.2 ) (0.1 ) Net revenue $ 1,743.2$ 1,676.9$ 66.3 4.0 % $ 1,676.9$ 1,662.4$ 14.5 0.9 % Gross profit $ 784.3$ 694.6$ 89.7 12.9 % $ 694.6$ 705.5$ (10.9 ) (1.5 )% Gross margin 45.0 % 41.4 % 41.4 % 42.4 % Research and development 296.0 258.5 37.5 14.5 % 258.5 244.0 14.5 5.9 % Percentage of net revenue 17.0 % 15.4 % 15.4 % 14.7 % Selling, general and administrative 450.4 429.3 21.1 4.9 % 429.3 427.0 2.3 0.5 % Percentage of net revenue 25.8 % 25.6 % 25.6 % 25.7 % Amortization of intangibles 59.0 76.0 (17.0 ) (22.4 )% 76.0 80.3 (4.3 ) (5.4 )% Percentage of net revenue 3.4 % 4.6 % 4.6 % 4.8 % Restructuring and related charges 23.8 19.0 4.8 25.3 % 19.0 12.4 6.6 53.2 % Percentage of net revenue 1.4 % 1.1 % 1.1 % 0.7 % Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax - - - - % - (29.5 ) 29.5 (100.0 )% Percentage of net revenue - % - % - % (1.8 )% Net Revenue Net revenue increased by $66.3 million, or 4.0%, during fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was primarily due to an increase in our CCOP and NSE segments, partially offset by a decrease in our OSP segment as discussed below. NSE net revenue increased by $19.4 million, or 2.7%, during fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was driven by $81.9 million of net revenue increases primarily from our MAC, Fiber, Location Intelligence, and Network Instrument product lines. These increases were primarily due to (i) demand for new products from a key customer in our MAC product line, (ii) increased spending for the deployment of LTE networks by key customers of our Fiber product line and (iii) incremental sales of new products from our strategic acquisitions in the second half of fiscal 2013 and during fiscal 2014. This was partially offset by $62.5 million of net revenue decreases primarily from our Mobile Assurance and Analytics, Packet Portal and Cloud and Data Center product lines. These decreases were primarily due to (i) the fact that the prior period reflected net revenue from a significant one-time project in our Mobile Assurance and Analytics product line, (ii) reduced spending in the current period from key customers in our Packet Portal product line and (iii) the exit of certain products in our Cloud and Data Center product line in the second half of fiscal 2013. CCOP net revenue increased $51.9 million, or 7.0%, during fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was driven by $68.8 million of net revenue increases primarily from products addressing the Consumer and Industrial markets, which consists of products in our 3D Sensing and Industrial Diode Laser product lines, and the Datacom market, which consists of products in our Pluggables product line. These increases were primarily driven by higher demand for our 3D sensing light source product related to the launch of our customer's next generation gaming console in the Consumer and 45



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Industrial markets and due to demand growth for our 10G and 40G products in the Datacom market. This was partially offset by $16.9 million of net revenue decreases from products addressing the Telecom market, which primarily consists of products in our Circuit Packs, Modulators, Passive Components, ROADMs, and Tunables product lines. These decreases were primarily due to lower spending on new network developments by large service providers. OSP net revenue decreased by $5.0 million, or 2.4%, during fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This decrease was driven by $10.2 million of net revenue decreases primarily from our Anti-Counterfeiting product line driven by lower cyclical demand in fiscal 2014. This was partially offset by $5.2 million of net revenue increases primarily from our Consumer and Industrial product line driven by increased cyclical demand for our 3D sensing optical filters and from last-time buys during fiscal 2014 of certain legacy products which we exited in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014. Net revenue increased by $14.5 million, or 0.9%, during fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This increase was primarily due to an incremental increase in volume in our CCOP segment in fiscal 2013 and the fact that fiscal 2012 reflected a reduction in CCOP net revenue of approximately $15 million due to the regional flooding in Thailand which temporarily suspended operations at one of our primary contract manufacturers, Fabrinet (the "Thailand Flooding Impact"). This was partially offset by a decline in NSE net revenue primarily due to the exit and wind down of certain products. NSE net revenue decreased by $25.9 million, or 3.4%, during fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This decrease was driven by $54.0 million of net revenue decreases primarily from our Broadband and Networking and Services product lines. These decreases were primarily due to (i) the exit of certain CPO products in the prior year, (ii) the wind down of legacy low-speed wireline products and (iii) procurement delays at a key customer. This was partially offset by $28.1 million of net revenue increases primarily from our Mobility product line driven by new products from the acquisitions of Dyaptive Systems, Inc. ("Dyaptive") and GenComm. CCOP net revenue increased $40.6 million, or 5.8%, during fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This increase was driven by $77.4 million of net revenue increases primarily from our Pluggables, Gesture Recognition Light Source, Modulators, and Tunables product lines. These increases were primarily due to (i) higher demand from key customers, (ii) strong demand for new products and (iii) the recovery from the Thailand Flooding Impact of fiscal 2012. This was partially offset by $36.8 million of net revenue decreases primarily from our ROADMs, Passive Components and Gas Lasers product lines, primarily due to lower demand from key customers for these products. OSP net revenue remained relatively flat in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012, decreasing by $0.2 million, or 0.1%. This decrease was driven by $7.6 million of net revenue decreases from our Consumer and Industrial product line primarily due to lower demand for defense products as a result of reductions in government spending and reduced orders for display and 3D products. This was partially offset by $7.4 million of net revenue increases primarily from our Anti-Counterfeiting product line driven by pigment security demand. Going forward, we expect to continue to encounter a number of industry and market risks and uncertainties that may limit our visibility, and consequently, our ability to predict future revenue, profitability and general financial performance, and that could create quarter over quarter variability in our financial measures. For example, continued economic issues in Europe have led to uncertain demand in our NSE and optical communications product portfolios, and we cannot predict when or to what extent this uncertainty will be resolved. Our revenues, profitability, and general financial performance may also be affected by: (a) strong pricing pressures, particularly within our optical communications markets, due to, among other things, a highly concentrated customer base, increasing competition, particularly from Asia-based competitors, and a general commoditization trend for certain products; (b) high product mix variability, particularly in our CCOP and NSE markets, which affects revenue and gross margin; (c) fluctuations in customer buying patterns, which cause demand, revenue 46



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

and profitability volatility; and (d) the current trend of communication industry consolidation, which is expected to continue, that directly affects our CCOP and NSE customer bases and adds additional risk and uncertainty to our financial and business projections. In addition, we anticipate lower demand and revenue from our 3D sensing products in our CCOP and OSP segments over the first two quarters of fiscal 2015 compared to the same periods in fiscal 2014. We operate primarily in three geographic regions: Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe Middle East and Africa ("EMEA"). The following table presents net revenue by geographic regions (dollars in millions): Years Ended June 28, June 29, June 30, 2014 2013 2012 Net revenue: Americas $ 826.0 47.4 % $ 822.5 49.1 % $ 833.2 50.1 % Asia-Pacific 505.4 29.0 473.2 28.2 428.5 25.8 EMEA 411.8 23.6 381.2 22.7 400.7 24.1 Total net revenue $ 1,743.2 100.0 % $ 1,676.9 100.0 % $ 1,662.4 100.0 % Net revenue is assigned to geographic regions based on customer shipment locations. Net revenue from customers outside the Americas for the fiscal years ended 2014, 2013 and 2012 represented 52.6%, 50.9% and 49.9% of net revenue, respectively. Net revenue from customers in the Americas for the fiscal years ended 2014, 2013 and 2012 included net revenue from the United States of $626.7 million, $630.8 million and $673.6 million, respectively. We expect revenue from customers outside of North America to continue to be an important part of our overall net revenue and an increasing focus for net revenue growth opportunities.



During fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, no single customer accounted for more than 10% of the Company's net revenue.

Gross Margin

Gross margin in fiscal 2014 increased 3.6 percentage points to 45.0% from 41.4% in fiscal 2013. This increase was primarily due to (i) a reduction in amortization of developed technology driven by certain significant intangible assets becoming fully amortized in the first quarter of fiscal 2014, (ii) an improvement in NSE gross margin driven by cost efficiencies resulting from operational, supply chain and product lifecycle management improvements, and the consolidation of our contract manufacturing partners during the second half of fiscal 2013, and (iii) an improvement in CCOP gross margin due to a more favorable product mix and cost reductions in fiscal 2014. This was partially offset by a change in segment mix as CCOP net revenue, which generates lower gross margin generally than our other two segments, represented a higher percentage of consolidated net revenue in fiscal 2014. Gross margin in fiscal 2013 decreased 1.0 percentage point to 41.4% from 42.4% in fiscal 2012. The decrease in gross margin was primarily due to (i) inventory charges and accelerated amortization of acquired developed technology related to the strategic exit of the legacy low-speed wireline product line in fiscal 2013, (ii) an increase in amortization expense of acquired developed technology primarily due to recent acquisitions and (iii) CCOP net revenue, which yields lower gross margin than our other two segments, represented a higher percentage of consolidated net revenue in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This was partially offset by improvements in CCOP gross margin primarily due to a more favorable product mix and improvements in yield in fiscal 2013. As discussed in more detail under "Net Revenue" above, we sell products in certain markets that are consolidating, undergoing product, architectural and business model transitions, have high customer 47



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

concentrations, are highly competitive (increasingly due to Asia-Pacific-based competition), are price sensitive and/or are affected by customer seasonal and mix variant buying patterns. We expect these factors to continue to result in variability of our gross margin.



Research and Development

R&D expense increased $37.5 million, or 14.5%, in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was driven by a $29.2 million increase in labor and benefits expense primarily due to higher headcount and corresponding compensation associated with our ongoing investment in R&D and our strategic acquisitions. As a percentage of net revenue, R&D expense increased by 1.6 percentage points in fiscal 2014 as we continued to invest in our product portfolio through R&D and acquisitions in order to develop new technologies, products and services that offer our customers increased value and strengthen our position in our core markets. R&D expense increased $14.5 million, or 5.9%, in fiscal 2013 compared to the same period a year ago. This increase was driven by a $15.6 million increase in labor and benefits expense primarily due to higher headcount associated with our continued investment in product development coupled with higher variable incentive and stock-based compensation in fiscal 2013. This was partially offset by a $2.0 million decrease in facilities expense primarily due to the exit from certain sites in connection with restructuring activities in our NSE segment in fiscal 2013. As a percentage of net revenue, R&D expense remained relatively flat, decreasing by 0.1 percentage points in fiscal 2013. We believe that continuing our investments in R&D is critical to attaining our strategic objectives. We plan to continue to invest in R&D and new products that will further differentiate us in the marketplace and expect our investment in dollar terms to increase in future quarters.



Selling, General and Administrative

SG&A expense increased $21.1 million, or 4.9%, in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was primarily driven by a $23.9 million increase in labor and benefits expense primarily due to higher headcount and corresponding compensation related to our strategic acquisitions. This was partially offset by a $4.1 million decrease in external costs due to the insourcing of certain IT applications in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013. As a percentage of net revenue, SG&A expense remained relatively flat, increasing by 0.2 percentage points in fiscal 2014. SG&A expense increased $2.3 million, or 0.5%, in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This increase was primarily driven by a $15.3 million increase in labor and benefits expense primarily due to higher headcount coupled with higher compensation. This was partially offset by reductions in legal expenses primarily due to the absence in fiscal 2013 of a $7.9 million legal expense in fiscal 2012 related to a litigation settlement and $4.7 million of net decreases in various other expenses. As a percentage of net revenue, SG&A expense remained relatively flat, decreasing by 0.1 percentage points in fiscal 2013. We intend to continue to focus on reducing our SG&A expense as a percentage of net revenue. However, we have in the recent past experienced, and may continue to experience in the future, certain non-core expenses, such as mergers and acquisitions-related expenses and litigation expenses, which could increase our SG&A expenses and potentially impact our profitability expectations in any particular quarter. Amortization of Intangibles



Amortization of intangibles for fiscal 2014 decreased $17.0 million, or 22.4%, to $59.0 million from $76.0 million in fiscal 2013. This decrease is driven by a $20.1 million reduction in amortization of developed technology primarily due to certain significant intangible assets becoming fully amortized in

48



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

the first quarter of fiscal 2014. This was partially offset by incremental amortization of intangible assets from our fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2014 acquisitions.

Amortization of intangibles for fiscal 2013 decreased $4.3 million, or 5.4%, to $76.0 million from $80.3 million in fiscal 2012.

Acquired In-Process Research and Development ("IPR&D")

In accordance with authoritative guidance, we recognize IPR&D at fair value as of the acquisition date, and subsequently account for it as an indefinite-lived intangible asset until completion or abandonment of the associated research and development efforts. We periodically review the stage of completion and likelihood of success of each IPR&D project. The nature of the efforts required to develop IPR&D projects into commercially viable products principally relates to the completion of all planning, designing, prototyping, verification and testing activities that are necessary to establish that the products can be produced to meet their design specifications, including functions, features and technical performance requirements. During fiscal 2014, we acquired IPR&D through the acquisitions of Network Instruments and Trendium. The current status of our significant IPR&D projects from acquisitions is as follows:



Network Instruments Acquisition

Network Instruments was acquired in January 2014 and was accounted for in accordance with the authoritative guidance on business combinations. At the time of acquisition, Network Instruments was in the process of developing next generation integrated network software solutions. We have incurred post-acquisition costs of approximately $1.1 million in fiscal 2014 and estimate that additional investment of approximately $0.4 million in research and development will be required to complete the project. The project is currently in the development stage and we expect to complete the project in the first quarter of fiscal 2015.



Trendium Acquisition

Trendium was acquired in December 2013 and was accounted for in accordance with the authoritative guidance on business combinations. At the time of acquisition, Trendium was in the process of developing network probe software and next generation service assurance solutions. We have incurred post-acquisition costs of approximately $1.0 million in fiscal 2014 and estimate that additional investment of approximately $1.4 million in research and development will be required to complete the project. The project is currently in the development stage and we expect to complete the project in the second quarter of fiscal 2015.



Restructuring and Related Charges

We continue to reduce costs through targeted restructuring efforts intended to consolidate our operations, rationalize the manufacturing of our products and align our businesses in response to market conditions. We estimate annualized cost savings of approximately $32.3 million excluding any one-time charge as a result of the restructuring activities initiated in the past year. Refer to "Note 11. Restructuring and Related Charges" for more information. As of June 28, 2014, our total restructuring accrual was $26.2 million. 49



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

During the twelve months ended June 28, 2014, we recorded $23.8 million in restructuring and related charges. The charges are a combination of new and previously announced restructuring plans and are primarily the result of the following:



º (i)

º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, Company management

("Management") approved a plan in the NSE segment to realign its

operations and strategy to allow for greater investment in high-growth

areas. As a result, a restructuring charge of $4.6 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for 123 employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions located in North America, Latin America, Asia and Europe. Payments related to the remaining severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. º (ii) º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, Management approved a plan



in the CCOP segment to close the Serangoon office located in Singapore

and move to a lower cost region in order to reduce manufacturing and R&D expenses. As a result, a restructuring charge of $1.7 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for approximately 50 employees primarily in manufacturing and R&D functions. Payments



related to the remaining severance and benefits accrual are expected

to be paid by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2015. º (iii) º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, Management approved a plan



to eliminate positions and re-define roles and responsibilities in our

Shared Service function in order to reduce cost, standardize global

processes and establish a more efficient organization. As a result, a

restructuring charge of $1.8 million was recorded for severance and

employee benefits for 48 employees primarily in general and

administrative functions located in the United States, Latin America,

Asia and Europe. Payments related to the remaining severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. º (iv)



º During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, Management approved a plan in

the NSE segment to realign its services, support and product resources

in response to market conditions in the mobile assurance market and to increase focus on software products and next generation solutions through acquisitions and R&D. As a result, a year to date restructuring charge of $7.2 million was recorded for severance and



employee benefits for 63 employees primarily in SG&A and manufacturing

functions located in North America, Latin America, Asia and Europe. Payments related to the remaining severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2020. º (v) º During the second quarter of fiscal 2014, Management approved a plan in the NSE segment to exit the remaining space in Germantown, Maryland. As of June 28, 2014, the Company exited the workspace in



Germantown under the plan. The fair value of the remaining contractual

obligations, net of sublease income as of June 28, 2014 was $6.9 million. Payments related to the Germantown lease costs are expected to be paid by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2019. º (vi) º During the second quarter of fiscal 2014, Management approved a plan to eliminate positions and re-define roles and responsibilities in the Finance and IT organization to align with the future state of the organizations under new executive management and move positions to



lower-cost locations where appropriate. As a result, a year-to-date

restructuring charge of $3.1 million was recorded for severance and benefits for 22 employees primarily in SG&A functions located in North



America, Asia and Europe. Payments related to the remaining severance

and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2022. 50



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

During the twelve months ended June 29, 2013, we recorded $19.0 million in restructuring and related charges. The charges are a combination of new and previously announced restructuring plans and are primarily the result of the following: º (i) º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan to re-align certain functions related to the CCOP segment to drive organizational efficiency and enhance the product line marketing leadership. As a result, a restructuring charge of $1.2 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for 28 employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions located in the North America and Asia. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2015. º (ii) º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan in our OSP segment to realign its operations to focus on priority markets such as Anti-Counterfeiting, Consumer and Industrial and Other offerings in government, aerospace and defense which resulted in



ceasing production of certain legacy products such as anti-reflection

coatings and front-surface mirrors for display and office automation

applications, solar cell covers, and select infrared products that use our Multi-layer Anti-reflection Coater, custom display, and some box



coater production platforms which were at the end of their lifecycle.

The business segment phased out production of these product offerings

by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2014 and de-commission and

dispose of certain production equipment as part of the plan. This will

result in consolidation of manufacturing operations and office space

in our site in Santa Rosa, CA and reduction of workforce by

approximately 126 employees primarily in in manufacturing, R&D and

SG&A functions located in the United States. Payments related to the

severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of

the first quarter of fiscal 2015.

º (iii)

º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan to consolidate workspace in Germantown, Maryland and Beijing, China, primarily used by the NSE segment. As of June 29, 2013, the Company had exited the affected facilities in both Germantown and Beijing under the plan. We accrued $4.2 million exit costs in accordance with



authoritative guidance related to lease and contract terminations. The

fair value of the remaining contractual obligations, net of sublease income as of June 29, 2013 was $5.0 million. Payments related to the Germantown lease costs are expected to be paid by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2019. Final payments related to the Beijing lease costs were paid during the first quarter of fiscal 2014.



º (iv)

º During the third quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan to

transition certain functions related to the CCOP segment to an

offshore contract manufacturer to align with our continuous efforts

for supply chain optimization. As a result, a restructuring charge of

$0.9 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for 44

employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions located

in the United States. Payments related to the severance and benefits

accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2015. º (v) º During the second quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan to align the Company's investment strategy in its NSE segment with customer spending priorities in high-growth product lines such as wireless network assurance and eliminate positions in R&D, sales and operations organization that supported low-growth product lines. As a result, a restructuring charge of $3.0 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for 63 employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions located in North America, Europe and Asia. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2015. 51



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

º (vi)

º During the first quarter of fiscal 2013, Management approved a plan to

terminate the CPV product line within the CCOP segment based on

limited opportunities for market growth. As a result, a restructuring

charge of $0.4 million was recorded for severance and employee benefits for 9 employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions located in United States, Europe, and Asia. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual were paid by the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013. º (vii) º The Company also incurred restructuring and related charges from previously announced restructuring plans in fiscal 2013 on the following: (i) $4.3 million additional severance and employee benefits primarily to adjust the accrual for the NSE Operation and Repair Outsourcing Restructuring announced during the fourth quarters of fiscal 2012 arising from 64 employees added to the original plan; (ii) $0.8 million for transfer costs and lease construction costs in NSE as the result of the repair outsourcing initiative announced by management during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012; and (iii) $0.5 million for the exit of two leased sites in NSE for the plan announced during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012. Payments related to the additional severance and benefits accrual in fiscal 2013 are expected to be paid by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2017.

During the twelve months ended June 30, 2012, we incurred restructuring expenses of $12.5 million, of which $0.1 million was attributable to the Hologram Business and is presented in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a component of Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax. The charges are a combination of new and previously announced restructuring plans and are primarily the result of the following:



º (i)

º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the NSE

Operation and Repair Outsourcing Restructuring Plan which focuses on

three areas in the NSE segment: (1) moving the repair organization to

a repair outsourcing partner; (2) reorganizing the R&D global team because of portfolio prioritization primarily in the CEM business to consolidate key platforms from several sites to single site; (3) reorganizing Global Sales to focus on strategic software growth, wireless growth, and to ensure sales account resources on the most critical global growth accounts. As a result, a restructuring charge of $4.3 million was recorded towards severance and employee benefits for 117 employees in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual are expected to be paid by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2017. º (ii) º During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the OSP Business Consolidation plan to consolidate and re-align the various business units within its OSP segment to improve synergies. As a result, a restructuring charge of $0.8 million was recorded towards severance and employee benefits for 17 employees primarily in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions. Of this $0.8 million restructuring charge, $0.1 million was attributable to the Hologram Business relating to severance and employee benefits for 1 employee and is presented in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a component of Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual were paid off by the third quarter of fiscal 2013. º (iii) º During the third quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the NSE



Manufacturing Support Consolidation Plan to continue to consolidate

its manufacturing support operations in the NSE segment, by reducing the number of contract manufacturer locations worldwide and moving most of them to lower cost regions such as Mexico and China. As a result, a restructuring charge of $2.8 million was recorded towards



severance and employee benefits for 80 employees in manufacturing, R&D

and SG&A functions. Payments related to the severance and benefits accrual were paid off by the first quarter of fiscal 2014. 52



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

º (iv)

º During the second quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the NSE Solution Business Restructuring Plan to re-organize the CEM business of the NSE segment to improve business efficiencies with greater focus



on the mobility and video software test business, and to re-organize

NSE's global operations to reduce costs by moving towards an

outsourcing model. As a result, a restructuring charge of $1.7 million

was recorded towards severance and employee benefits for 57 employees

in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions. Payments related to the

remaining severance and benefits accrual were paid off by the second

quarter of fiscal 2013.

º (v)

º During the second quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the NSE Germantown Tower Restructuring Plan to consolidate workspace in Germantown, Maryland, primarily used by the NSE segment. As of December 31, 2011, the Company exited the workspace in Germantown under the plan. We accrued $0.6 million exit costs in accordance with



authoritative guidance related to lease and contract terminations. The

fair value of the remaining contractual obligations, net of sublease income as of June 30, 2012 was $0.5 million. Payments related to the lease costs are expected to be paid by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2019. º (vi) º During the first quarter of fiscal 2012, Management approved the CCOP Fiscal Q1 2012 Plan to restructure certain CCOP segment functions and responsibilities to drive efficiency and segment profitability in light of economic conditions. As a result, a restructuring charge of $1.1 million was recorded towards severance and employee benefits for 40 employees in manufacturing, R&D and SG&A functions. Payments related to the severance and benefits were paid off by the second quarter of fiscal 2012. º (vii)



º We also incurred restructuring and related charges from previously

announced restructuring plans in fiscal 2012 on the following:

(i) $0.5 million benefit arising primarily from $1.2 million benefit

to adjust down the previous accrual of employee severance and benefits

under NSE Sales and Market Rebalance Plan due to management's decision

to re-locate employees and realize co-location efficiencies, offset by

$0.7 million on severance and employee benefits, primarily on continued implementation of the NSE Germany Restructuring Plan; (ii) $1.6 million for manufacturing transfer costs in the NSE and OSP



segments which were the result of the transfer of certain production

processes into existing sites in the United States or to contract manufacturers; and (iii) $0.1 million charge arising primarily from $1.0 million lease termination cost under NSE Rebalancing Restructuring Plan, offset by $0.9 million benefit to adjust the accrual for previously restructured leases in the NSE segment which were the result of continued efforts to reduce and/or consolidate manufacturing locations. Our restructuring and other lease exit cost obligations are net of sublease income or lease settlement estimates of approximately $6.0 million. Our ability to generate sublease income, as well as our ability to terminate lease obligations and recognize the anticipated related savings, is highly dependent upon the economic conditions, particularly commercial real estate market conditions in certain geographies, at the time we negotiate the lease termination and sublease arrangements with third parties as well as the performances by such third parties of their respective obligations. While the amount we have accrued represents the best estimate of the remaining obligations we expect to incur in connection with these plans, estimates are subject to change. Routine adjustments are required and may be required in the future as conditions and facts change through the implementation period. If adverse macroeconomic conditions continue, particularly as they pertain to the commercial real estate market, or if, for any reason, tenants under subleases fail to perform their obligations, we may be required to reduce estimated future sublease income and adjust the estimated amounts of future settlement agreements, and accordingly, increase estimated costs to exit certain facilities. Amounts related to the lease expense, net of anticipated sublease proceeds, will be paid over the respective lease terms through fiscal 2019. 53



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Interest and Other Income (Expense), Net

Interest and other income (expense), net was $0.5 million in fiscal 2014 as compared to $(4.1) million in fiscal 2013. This $4.6 million change was primarily the result of a $4.1 million realized loss in the prior period in connection with the repurchase of $150.0 million aggregate principal amount of our 1% Senior Convertible Notes due 2026 (the "2026 Notes"). The 2026 Notes were fully repurchased and redeemed in fiscal 2013. Interest and other income (expense) net decreased by $16.9 million during fiscal 2013, to $4.1 million of expense from $12.8 million of income during fiscal 2012. This decrease was primarily driven by (i) a reduction in other income primarily due to the absence in 2013 of $9.4 million of insurance proceeds received in fiscal 2012 from our claims on loss associated with the Thailand flooding, (ii) $3.4 million of additional loss realized from the repurchase of $150.0 million aggregate principal amount of 1% Senior Convertible Notes at or below par during fiscal 2013 and (iii) a $2.8 million unfavorable variance in foreign exchange results in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. This was partially offset by a $0.6 million decrease in various other expenses.



Interest Expense

Interest expense increased by $11.8 million, or 65.9%, in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. This increase was primarily due to higher accretion of the debt discount and contractual interest expense recognized on our 2033 Notes in fiscal 2014 as compared to the accretion and contractual interest expense on our 2026 Notes in fiscal 2013. The increase was primarily driven by the fact that the unamortized debt discount of our 2033 Notes was significantly higher than that of our 2026 Notes in fiscal 2013. During fiscal 2014 we accreted debt discount and recognized contractual interest expense on our 2033 Notes of $20.7 million and $3.5 million, respectively. During fiscal 2013 we accreted debt discount and recognized contractual interest expense on our 2026 Notes of $12.0 million and $1.8 million, respectively. Interest expense decreased by $9.4 million, or 34.4%, to $17.9 million from $27.3 million in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. The decrease in interest expense during fiscal 2013 was primarily due to repurchases of $150.0 million of the aggregate principal amount of the 1% Senior Convertible Notes during the first three quarters of fiscal 2013 and the redemption of the remaining $161.0 million aggregate principal amount of our 1% Senior Convertible Notes in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013.



(Benefit from) Provision for Income Tax

Fiscal 2014 Tax Expense/Benefit

We recorded an income tax benefit of $13.1 million for fiscal 2014. The expected tax benefit derived by applying the federal statutory rate to our loss before income taxes for fiscal 2014 differed from the income tax benefit recorded primarily as a result of domestic and foreign losses that were not realized due to valuation allowances and offset by the recognition of $21.7 million of uncertain tax benefits related to deferred tax assets due to the expiration of the statute of limitations in a non-US jurisdiction. In addition, we recorded a tax benefit of $6.4 million related to the income tax intraperiod tax allocation rules in relation to other comprehensive income. Based on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction review of anticipated future income and due to the continued economic uncertainty in the industry, Management has determined that in many of our jurisdictions, it is more likely than not that our net deferred tax assets will not be realized in those jurisdictions. During fiscal 2014, the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets decreased by $49.3 million. The decrease was primarily related to an increase in acquisition and debt issuance related deferred tax liabilities. We are routinely subject to various federal, state and foreign audits by taxing 54



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

authorities. We believe that adequate amounts have been provided for any adjustments that may result from these examinations.

Fiscal 2013 Tax Expense/Benefit

We recorded an income tax benefit of $103.9 million for 2013. The expected tax benefit derived by applying the federal statutory rate to our loss before income taxes for fiscal 2013 differed from the income tax benefit recorded primarily due to a net reduction in our valuation allowance related to valuation allowance releases, utilization of foreign net operating losses, and the recognition of tax credits generated during the current year.



During fiscal year 2013, after considering all available evidence, both positive and negative, we determined that a valuation allowance release of $107.9 million was appropriate for a foreign subsidiary because it was more likely than not that the deferred tax assets of the foreign subsidiary would be realized.

Previously, upon considering the totality of the negative evidence that existed with respect to the realization of the foreign subsidiary's deferred tax assets, which included its history of losses, the economic uncertainty of the foreign subsidiary's operations existing at that time, and the fact that there was no reasonable expectation or projections of future pre-tax income to support the realization of the deferred tax assets associated with the cumulative losses, we had recorded a full valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets. In light of the historical losses and in order to improve the profitability of the foreign subsidiary, beginning in fiscal year 2011 and continuing in later years, we implemented targeted reorganization activities and instituted a new business model for the foreign subsidiary. Under the new business model, we became the worldwide distributor for most of the products manufactured by the foreign subsidiary and the foreign subsidiary began performing certain cost-plus reimbursable services for us. The foreign subsidiary's operations improved as a result of the actions described above and resulted in a pre-tax profit for fiscal year 2013 and cumulative pre-tax income for the preceding three-year period. Moreover, based on the foreign subsidiary's improved operational activities and performance under the new business model it was able to reasonably forecast continued future pre-tax earnings. The reasonableness of the foreign subsidiary's forecast of continued future pre-tax earnings is supported by the facts that we intend to continue to use the new business model and the forecast is not dependent on any changes to the new business model, additional reorganization activities, or improvements to operational activities. Therefore, as described above, based on all available evidence, including both positive and negative, and the weight of that evidence, we concluded that it was more likely than not that the deferred tax assets of the foreign subsidiary would be realized and that the applicable valuation allowance should be released.



In addition, during fiscal 2013 we recorded net income tax expense of $4.0 million attributable to the results of our worldwide operations.

Based on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction review of anticipated future income and due to the continued economic uncertainty in the industry, Management has determined that in many of our jurisdictions, it is more likely than not that our net deferred tax assets will not be realized in those jurisdictions. During fiscal 2013, the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets decreased by $87.9 million. The decrease was primarily related to the valuation allowance release mentioned above. We are routinely subject to various federal, state and foreign audits by taxing authorities. We believe that adequate amounts have been provided for any adjustments that may result from these examinations. 55



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Fiscal 2012 Tax Expense/Benefit

We recorded an income tax expense of $12.0 million for fiscal 2012. The expected tax benefit derived by applying the federal statutory rate to our loss before income taxes for fiscal 2012 differed from the income tax expense recorded primarily as a result of domestic and foreign losses that were not benefited due to valuation allowances.

Based on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction review of anticipated future income and due to the continued economic uncertainty in the industry, management has determined that in most of our jurisdictions, it is more likely than not that our net deferred tax assets will not be realized in those jurisdictions. During fiscal 2012, the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets increased by $25.8 million. The increase was primarily due to domestic and foreign tax net operating losses sustained during the fiscal year, offset by utilization and expiration of domestic and foreign net operating losses. We are routinely subject to various federal, state and foreign audits by taxing authorities. We believe that adequate amounts have been provided for any adjustments that may result from these examinations.



Discontinued Operations

During the second quarter of fiscal 2013, we closed the sale of the Hologram Business, previously within the OSP reportable segment, and received gross proceeds of $11.5 million in cash, subject to an earnout clause requiring the buyer to pay up to a maximum additional amount of $4.0 million if the revenue generated by the business exceeds a pre-determined target amount during the one-year period immediately following the closing. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, we submitted an arbitration demand to resolve a dispute regarding the amount we are owed from the buyer under the earnout clause. If any amount related to the earn-out clause meets the recognition criteria it will be included as a component of discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Net revenue of the Hologram Business for fiscal 2013 and 2012 was $5.2 million and $19.7 million, respectively. Net loss from discontinued operations for fiscal 2013 and 2012 was zero and $29.5 million, respectively. Net loss from discontinued operation in fiscal 2012 primarily related to impairment charges on long-lived assets. There was no tax effect associated with the discontinued operation for any periods presented.



Operating Segment Information (dollars in millions):

Percentage Percentage 2014 2013 Change Change 2013 2012 Change Change NSE: Net revenue $ 748.3$ 728.9$ 19.4 2.7 % $ 728.9$ 754.8$ (25.9 ) (3.4 )% Operating income 80.3 83.1 (2.8 ) (3.4 ) 83.1 98.3 (15.2 ) (15.5 ) Operating margin 10.7 % 11.4 % 11.4 % 13.0 % CCOP: Net revenue $ 794.1$ 742.2$ 51.9 7.0 % $ 742.2$ 701.6$ 40.6 5.8 % Operating income 93.5 82.4 11.1 13.5 82.4 72.0 10.4 14.4 Operating margin 11.8 % 11.1 % 11.1 % 10.3 % OSP: Net revenue $ 200.8$ 205.8$ (5.0 ) (2.4 )% $ 205.8$ 206.0$ (0.2 ) (0.1 )% Operating income 72.0 73.2 (1.2 ) (1.6 ) 73.2 72.5 0.7 1.0 Operating margin 35.9 % 35.6 % 35.6 % 35.2 % 56



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

Network and Service Enablement

Network and Service Enablement operating margin decreased 0.7 percentage points during fiscal 2014 to 10.7% from 11.4% in fiscal 2013. The decrease in operating margin was primarily due to an increase in operating expenses driven by (i) higher headcount, (ii) R&D investments primarily related to our strategic acquisitions and (iii) higher commissions driven by the overall increase in NSE net revenue as referenced above. This was partially offset by cost efficiencies resulting from operational, supply chain and product lifecycle management improvements, and the consolidation of our contract manufacturing partners during the second half of fiscal 2013. NSE operating margin decreased 1.6 percentage points during fiscal 2013 to 11.4% from 13.0% in fiscal 2012. The decrease was primarily driven by a 3.4% decrease in net revenue as discussed above, partially offset by an improvement in gross margin primarily due to (i) a more favorable product mix as net revenue from higher margin products increased compared to fiscal 2012, particularly from new products from the acquisitions of Dyaptive and GenComm in our Mobility product line, (ii) savings obtained through restructuring activities to consolidate and rationalize business functions, and (iii) savings associated with the recent outsourcing of our repair operations and ongoing efforts to outsource manufacturing and reduce the number of contract manufacturing partners.



Communications and Commercial Optical Products

CCOP operating margin increased 0.7 percentage points during fiscal 2014 to 11.8% from 11.1% in fiscal 2013. The increase was driven by an improvement in gross margin primarily due to a more favorable product mix and cost reductions, coupled with an overall increase in CCOP net revenue as referenced above. This was partially offset by an increase in R&D expense primarily due to higher headcount associated with our ongoing R&D investments and to lower R&D offsets from customer-funded development projects in the current period versus the prior period. CCOP operating margin increased 0.8 percentage points during fiscal 2013 to 11.1% from 10.3% in fiscal 2012. The increase was primarily driven by an improvement in gross margin primarily due to a more favorable product mix and improvement in yield in fiscal 2013. Also contributing to the increase in operating margin was a 5.8% increase in net revenue as discussed above. This was partially offset by an increase in R&D and SG&A expense primarily due to higher R&D headcount and increased variable incentive compensation in fiscal 2013.



Optical Security and Performance Products

OSP operating margin remained relatively flat in fiscal 2014, increasing by 0.3 percentage points from fiscal 2013.

OSP operating margin increased 0.4 percentage points during fiscal 2013 to 35.6% from 35.2% in fiscal 2012. The increase was primarily driven by reductions in SG&A expense due to a one-time benefit from a litigation settlement related to an insurance claim in fiscal 2013 and due to lower labor and benefits expense. This was partially offset by (i) a decline in gross margin driven by factory underutilization and charges associated with the announced exit of certain product lines and (ii) an increase in R&D expense primarily due to spending on key innovation initiatives.



Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our cash investments are made in accordance with an investment policy approved by the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. In general, our investment policy requires that securities purchased be rated A-1/P-1, A/A2 or better. In November, 2012, the policy was amended to allow an allocation to securities rated A-2/P-2, BBB/Baa2 or better, with such allocation not to exceed 10% of any investment portfolio. Securities that are downgraded subsequent to purchase are evaluated and may 57



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

be sold or held at management's discretion. No security may have an effective maturity that exceeds 37 months, and the average duration of our holdings may not exceed 18 months. At any time, no more than 5% or $5 million (whichever is greater) of each investment portfolio may be concentrated in a single issuer other than the U.S. or sovereign governments or agencies. Our investments in debt securities and marketable equity securities are primarily classified as available-for-sale investments or trading assets and are recorded at fair value. The cost of securities sold is based on the specific identification method. Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale investments are reported as a separate component of stockholders' equity. We did not hold any investments in auction rate securities, mortgage backed securities, collateralized debt obligations, or variable rate demand notes at June 28, 2014 and virtually all debt securities held were of investment grade (at least BBB/Baa2). As of June 28, 2014, Company entities in the U.S. owned approximately 81.7% of our cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and restricted cash. As of June 28, 2014, the majority of our cash investments have maturities of 90 days or less and are of high credit quality. Although we intend to hold these investments to maturity, in the event that we are required to sell any of these securities under adverse market conditions, losses could be recognized on such sales. During the twelve months ended June 28, 2014, we have not realized material investment losses but can provide no assurance that the value or the liquidity of our investments will not be impacted by adverse conditions in the financial markets. In addition, we maintain cash balances in operating accounts that are with third party financial institutions. These balances in the U.S. may exceed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC") insurance limits. While we monitor the cash balances in our operating accounts and adjust the cash balances as appropriate, these cash balances could be impacted if the underlying financial institutions fail. Fiscal 2014 As of June 28, 2014 our combined balance of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and restricted cash increased by $365.4 million, or 70.8%, to $881.3 million from $515.9 million as of June 29, 2013. The increase in the combined balance was primarily driven by $650.0 million of cash received from the issuance of the 2033 Notes and $176.6 million of cash provided by operations, partially offset by (i) $216.0 million of cash used for the acquisitions of Network Instruments, Time-Bandwidth and Trendium, (ii) $155.2 million of cash used to repurchase our common stock and (iii) $99.8 million of cash used for capital expenditures. Cash provided by operating activities was $176.6 million, primarily resulting from $175.9 million of net income adjusted for both non-cash charges (e.g., depreciation, amortization and stock-based compensation) and changes in our deferred tax balances which are non-cash in nature, partially offset by changes in operating assets and liabilities of $0.7 million. Changes in our operating assets and liabilities related primarily to a $25.9 million increase in accounts payable due to timing and slightly slower payment activity in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014 as compared to the same period in the prior year, partially offset by a $19.6 million decrease in accrued payroll and related expenses due to the lower commissions and variable incentive pay, and a $9.6 million increase in accounts receivable due to a year-over-year increase in revenue. Cash used in investing activities was $651.8 million, primarily resulting from (i) $1,072.9 million of purchases of available-for-sale investments, (ii) $216.0 million of cash used for the acquisitions of Network Instruments, Time-Bandwidth and Trendium, (iii) and $99.8 million of cash used for capital expenditures, partially offset by $730.0 million of maturities and sales of available-for-sale investments, and $9.2 million of net proceeds from the sale of assets. Cash provided by financing activities was $489.6 million, primarily resulting from $650.0 million of cash received from our issuance of the 2033 Notes, $22.5 million of cash received from the exercise of stock options and the issuance of common stock under our employee stock purchase plan, partially 58



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

offset $155.2 million of cash used to repurchase our common stock, $14.2 million to pay financing obligations, and $13.5 million of cash used for the payment of issuance costs for the 2033 Notes.



Fiscal 2013

We had a combined balance of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and restricted cash of $515.9 million at June 29, 2013, a decrease of $236.8 million from June 30, 2012. Cash and cash equivalents decreased by $120.1 million in the twelve months ended June 29, 2013, primarily due to $306.8 million used to repurchase our 1% Senior Convertible Notes, $83.2 million used for the acquisitions of business, and $65.1 million used for the purchase of property, plant and equipment, offset by net cash inflows of $110.0 million provided by the maturities, sales and purchases of investments, and cash provided by operating activities of $187.8 million. Cash provided by operating activities was $187.8 million, resulting from our net income adjusted for non-cash items such as depreciation, amortization and stock-based compensation of $279.4 million offset by changes in operating assets and liabilities that used $91.6 million. Changes in operating assets and liabilities related primarily to an increase in net deferred taxes of $119.5 million, due to a $107.9 million non-cash release of deferred tax valuation allowances in a non-U.S. jurisdiction, a decrease in accounts payable of $16.1 million primarily due to an increase in payments prior to year end enabled by stronger operating cash flows in fiscal 2013, and a decrease in accrued payroll and related expenses of $9.4 million, offset by a decrease in accounts receivable of $39.2 million primarily driven by our collection efforts and a decrease in inventory of $27.2 million primarily due to an increase in shipments and further leveraging our contract manufacturing supply chain management. Cash used in investing activities was $25.0 million, primarily related to cash used for the acquisitions of GenComm and Arieso of $83.2 million, and cash used for the purchase of property, plant and equipment of $65.1 million offset by net cash inflows provided by the maturities, sales and purchases of investments of $110.0 million, and net proceeds from sale of the Hologram Business of $11.2 million. Investments made during the twelve months ended June 29, 2013 included new technology, laboratory and manufacturing equipment, the set up and improvements to facilities, and upgrading information technology systems. Cash used in financing activities was $283.8 million, primarily related to the repurchase of our 1% Senior Convertible Notes in the amount of $306.8 million, offset by proceeds from the exercise of stock options and the issuance of common stock under our employee stock purchase plan of $25.7 million.



Fiscal 2012

We had a combined balance of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and restricted cash of $752.7 million at June 30, 2012, an increase of $24.0 million from July 2, 2011. Cash and cash equivalents increased by $5.7 million in the twelve months ended June 30, 2012, primarily due to cash provided by operating activities of $119.1 million, offset by $72.2 million used for the purchases of property, plant and equipment, net cash outflows of $26.6 million used for the purchase of available-for-sale investments, $12.5 million used for the acquisition of QuantaSol Limited ("QuantaSol") and Dyaptive and $1.9 million used in financing activities. Cash provided by operating activities was $119.1 million, resulting from our net loss adjusted for non-cash items such as depreciation, amortization, impairment of long-lived assets and stock-based compensation of $199.4 million, and changes in operating assets and liabilities that used $80.3 million related primarily to a decrease in accounts payable of $29.2 million, a decrease in accrued payroll and related expenses of $25.3 million, an increase in other current and non-current assets of $14.8 million, a decrease in accrued expenses and other current and non-current liabilities of $11.1 million, and an increase in inventories of $7.7 million, offset by a decrease in accounts receivable of $17.2 million primarily due to decrease in net revenue compared with fiscal 2011. 59



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

The $29.2 million decrease in accounts payable was primarily due to timing of purchases and payments. The $25.3 million decrease in accrued payroll and related expenses was primarily due to timing of salary and payroll tax payments and lower bonus and commission accruals. The $14.8 million increase in other current and non-current assets was primarily due to higher advances to our contract manufacturers to support future growth and increases in value-added tax receivables and prepayments of license and maintenance fees. The $11.1 million decrease in other current and non-current liabilities was mainly due to timing of invoicing and lower accrual related to contract manufacturing scrap expenses. Cash used by investing activities was $105.7 million, primarily related to cash used for the purchase of property, plant and equipment of $72.2 million, net cash outflows used for the purchase of available-for-sale investments of $26.6 million, and cash used for the acquisition of QuantaSol and Dyaptive of $12.5 million, offset by proceeds from sale of assets of $2.1 million. Since we continue to invest in new technology, laboratory equipment, and manufacturing capacity to support revenue growth across all three segments, significant investments were made during fiscal 2012 to increase our manufacturing capacity in Asia and the U.S. and to upgrade our information technology systems. Our financing activities used cash of $1.9 million, related to repayments of the carrying amount and reacquisition of the equity component of our 1% Senior Convertible Notes in the amount of $13.2 million, payments made on financing obligations of $11.6 million primarily related to software licenses, and payments for issuance cost of our revolving credit facility of $1.9 million, offset by proceeds from the exercise of stock options and the issuance of common stock under our employee stock purchase plan of $17.9 million and proceeds from financing obligation of $6.9 million related to the Eningen sale and leaseback transaction. Contractual Obligations The following summarizes our contractual obligations at June 28, 2014, and the effect such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flow over the next five years (in millions): Payments due by period Less than 1 - 3 3 - 5 More than Total 1 year years years 5 years Contractual Obligations Asset retirement obligations-expected cash payments $ 7.1$ 2.0$ 2.1$ 1.2$ 1.8 Long term debt:(1) 0.625% Senior convertible notes 650.0 - - 650.0 - Estimated interest payments 16.8 4.1 8.1 4.6 - Purchase obligations(2) 150.0 141.2 5.5 0.4 2.9 Operating lease obligations(2) 118.7 26.6 44.8 28.1 19.2 Pension and postretirement benefit payments(3) 111.5 5.2 13.0 14.4 78.9 Other non-current liabilities related to acquisition holdbacks(4) 6.0 - 5.5 0.5 - Total $ 1,060.1$ 179.1$ 79.0$ 699.2$ 102.8



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

º (1) º Refer to "Note 10. Debts and Letters of Credit" for more information. º (2)



º Refer to "Note 17. Commitments and Contingencies" for more information.

º (3) º Refer to "Note 15. Employee Benefit Plans" for more information. º (4) º Refer to "Note 5. Mergers and Acquisitions" for more information. 60



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

As of June 28, 2014, we have accrued in our Consolidated Balance Sheets $13.1 million in connection with restructuring and related activities relating to our operating lease obligations disclosed above, of which $3.8 million was included in Other current liabilities and $9.3 million was included in Other non-current liabilities. Purchase obligations represent legally-binding commitments to purchase inventory and other commitments made in the normal course of business to meet operational requirements. Of the $150.0 million of purchase obligations as of June 28, 2014, $48.1 million are related to inventory and the other $101.9 million are non-inventory items.



As of June 28, 2014, our other non-current liabilities primarily relate to asset retirement obligations, pension and financing obligations which are presented in various lines in the preceding table.

As we are unable to reasonably predict the timing of settlement of liabilities related to unrecognized tax benefits including penalties and interest, the table does not include $28.2 million of such liabilities recorded on our consolidated balance sheet as of June 28, 2014.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements, as such term is defined in rules promulgated by the SEC, that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to investors.



Acquisitions

As part of our strategy, we are committed to the on-going evaluation of strategic opportunities and, where appropriate, the acquisition of additional products, technologies or businesses that are complementary to, or broaden the markets for our products. We believe we strengthened our business model by expanding our addressable market, customer base, and expertise, diversifying our product portfolio, and fortifying our core businesses through acquisition as well as through organic initiatives. In January 2014, we completed the acquisition of Network Instruments, a privately-held U.S. company and leading developer of enterprise network and application-performance management solutions for global 2000 companies. The acquisition further strengthens our position as a key solutions provider to the enterprise, data center and cloud networking markets. In order to improve application performance, reduce costs and address increasing network complexity, enterprise network administrators are rapidly transforming their IT networks while embracing today's most critical technology initiatives such as unified communications, cloud, and data center consolidation. Network Instruments helps enterprises simplify the management and optimization of their networks with high-performance solutions that provide actionable intelligence and deep network visibility. We acquired all outstanding shares of Network Instruments for a total purchase price of $208.5 million in cash, including holdback payments of approximately $20.0 million. Also in January 2014, we completed the acquisition of Time-Bandwidth, a privately-held provider of high powered and ultrafast lasers for industrial and scientific markets. Use of ultrafast lasers for micromachining applications is being driven primarily by increasing use of consumer electronics and connected devices globally. Manufacturers are taking advantage of high-power and ultrafast lasers to create quality micro parts for consumer electronics and to process semiconductor chips for consumer devices. Time-Bandwidth's technology complements our current laser portfolio, while enabling Time-Bandwidth to leverage our high volume and low-cost manufacturing model, global sales team and channel relationships. We acquired all outstanding shares of Time-Bandwidth for a total purchase price of $15.0 million in cash, including a holdback payment of approximately $2.3 million. 61



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

In December 2013, we acquired certain technology and other assets from Trendium, a privately-held provider of real-time intelligence software solutions for customer experience assurance ("CEA"), asset optimization and monetization of big data for 4G/LTE mobile network operators. The addition of Trendium employees and technology enables the Company to introduce a new paradigm of CEA, enabling operators of 4G/LTE networks to achieve a real and relevant improvement in customer satisfaction while maximizing productivity and profitability for dynamic converged 4G/LTE networks and beyond. We acquired certain technology and other assets from Trendium for a total purchase price of $26.1 million in cash, including a holdback payment of approximately $2.5 million. In March 2013, we completed the acquisition of Arieso based in the United Kingdom. We acquired tangible and intangible assets and assumed liabilities of Arieso for a total purchase price of approximately $89.7 million in cash, including holdback payments of approximately $12.8 million. In August 2012, we completed the acquisition of GenComm based in Seoul, South Korea. We acquired tangible and intangible assets and assumed liabilities of GenComm for a total purchase price of approximately $15.2 million in cash, including holdback payments of approximately $3.8 million.



In January 2012, we completed the acquisition of Dyaptive based in Vancouver, Canada. We acquired tangible and intangible assets and assumed liabilities of Dyaptive for a total purchase price of approximately CAD 14.9 million (USD 14.8 million) in cash, including a holdback payment of approximately CAD 2.0 million (USD 2.0 million).

Please refer to "Note 5. Mergers and Acquisitions" of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Employee Equity Incentive Plan

Our stock option and Full Value Award program is a broad-based, long-term retention program that is intended to attract and retain employees and align stockholder and employee interests. As of June 28, 2014, we have available for issuance 8.2 million shares of common stock for grant primarily under our Amended and Restated 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (the "2003 Plan") and 2005 Acquisition Equity Incentive Plan (the "2005 Plan"). The exercise price for the options is equal to the fair market value of the underlying stock at the date of grant. Options generally become exercisable over a three-year or four-year period and, if not exercised, expire from five to ten years post grant date. Full Value Awards are performance-based, time-based, or a combination of both and are expected to vest over one to four years. The fair value of the time-based Full Value Awards is based on the closing market price of our common stock on the grant date of the award. Refer to "Note 14. Stock-Based Compensation" for more information.



Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits

As a result of acquiring Acterna, Inc. ("Acterna") in August 2005, NSD in May 2010, and Time-Bandwidth in January 2014, we sponsor significant pension plans for certain past and present employees in the United Kingdom ("U.K."), Germany and Switzerland. We are also responsible for the non-pension post-retirement benefit obligation assumed from a past acquisition. Most of these plans have been closed to new participants and no additional service costs are being accrued, except for certain plans in Germany and Switzerland assumed in connection with acquisitions during fiscal 2010 and the third quarter of fiscal 2014. The U.K. plan and Switzerland plan are partially funded and the German plans, which were initially established as "pay-as-you-go" plans, are unfunded. As of June 28, 2014, our pension plans were under funded by $110.4 million since the PBO exceeded the fair value of its plan assets. Similarly, we had a liability of $1.1 million related to our non-pension post-retirement benefit plan. 62



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents

We anticipate future annual outlays related to the German plans will approximate estimated future benefit payments. These future benefit payments have been estimated based on the same actuarial assumptions used to measure our projected benefit obligation and currently are forecasted to range between $4.2 million and $5.8 million per annum. In addition, we expect to contribute approximately $0.8 million and $0.3 million to the U.K. and Switzerland plans during fiscal 2015.



During fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013, we contributed GBP 0.5 million or approximately $0.7 million in each fiscal year to our U.K. pension plan. These contributions allowed the Company to comply with regulatory funding requirements.

A key actuarial assumption in calculating the net periodic cost and the PBO is the discount rate. Changes in the discount rate impact the interest cost component of the net periodic benefit cost calculation and PBO due to the fact that the PBO is calculated on a net present value basis. Decreases in the discount rate will generally increase pre-tax cost, recognized expense and the PBO. Increases in the discount rate tend to have the opposite effect. We estimate a 50 basis point ("BPS") decrease or increase in the discount rate would cause a corresponding increase or decrease, respectively, in the PBO of approximately $9.7 million based upon data as of June 28, 2014.



Liquidity and Capital Resources Requirement

Our primary liquidity and capital spending requirements over at least the next 12 months will be the funding of our operating activities and capital expenditures. As of June 28, 2014 our expected commitments for capital expenditures totaled approximately $25.2 million. We believe our existing cash balances and investments will be sufficient to meet our liquidity and capital spending requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, there are a number of factors that could positively or negatively impact our liquidity position, including: º • º global economic conditions which affect demand for our products and services and impact the financial stability of our suppliers and customers; º • º changes in accounts receivable, inventory or other operating assets and liabilities which affect our working capital; º • º increase in capital expenditure to support the revenue growth opportunity of our business; º •



º the tendency of customers to delay payments or to negotiate favorable

payment term to manage their own liquidity positions; º • º timing of payments to our suppliers; º • º factoring or sale of accounts receivable; º • º volatility in fixed income and credit which impact the liquidity and valuation of our investment portfolios; º •



º volatility in foreign exchange markets which impacts our financial

results;

º •

º possible investments or acquisitions of complementary businesses,

products or technologies; º • º issuance or repurchase of debt or equity securities; º • º potential funding of pension liabilities either voluntarily or as required by law or regulation, and º • º compliance with covenants and other terms and conditions related to our financing arrangements. 63



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Edgar Glimpses


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters