News Column

Studies from World Bank Have Provided New Data on Politics (The Law's Majestic Equality? The Distributive Impact of Judicializing Social and Economic...

August 28, 2014



Studies from World Bank Have Provided New Data on Politics (The Law's Majestic Equality? The Distributive Impact of Judicializing Social and Economic Rights)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- Data detailed on Politics have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Washington, District of Columbia, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "While many find cause for optimism about the use of law and rights for progressive ends, the academic literature has long been skeptical that courts favor the poor. We show that, with the move toward a robust 'new constitutionalism' of social and economic rights, the assumptions underlying the skepticism do not always hold."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from World Bank, "Our theories must account for variation in the elite bias of law and litigation. In particular, we need to pay closer attention to the broad, collective effects of legal mobilization, rather than focusing narrowly on the litigants and the direct benefits they receive. We support the claim by showing that litigation pursued in legal contexts that create the expectation of collective effects is more likely to avoid the potential anti-poor bias of courts. On the other hand, policy areas dominated by individual litigation and individualized effects are more likely to experience regressive outcomes. Using data on social and economic rights cases in four countries, we estimate the potential pro-poor impact of litigation by examining whether the poor are over or under-represented among the beneficiaries of litigation. We find that the impact of courts is positive and very much pro-poor in India and South Africa, and slightly negative in Indonesia and Brazil."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Overall, we challenge the tendency in the literature to focus on the direct effects of litigation, find that the results of litigation are more positive for the poor than the conventional wisdom would lead us to expect, and offer an explanation that accounts for part of the variation while raising a number of questions for future research."

For more information on this research see: The Law's Majestic Equality? The Distributive Impact of Judicializing Social and Economic Rights. Perspectives on Politics, 2014;12(2):375-393. Perspectives on Politics can be contacted at: Cambridge Univ Press, 32 Avenue Of The Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, USA. (Cambridge University Press - www.cambridge.org; Perspectives on Politics - journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PPS)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D.M. Brinks, World Bank, Dev Res Grp, Washington, DC, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Politics, Washington, United States, District of Columbia, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories on investments and markets, please see HispanicBusiness' Finance Channel



Source: Politics & Government Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters