News Column

Studies from National Institute for Materials Science Describe New Findings in Physics Research (Dislocation Generation and Propagation across the...

August 26, 2014



Studies from National Institute for Materials Science Describe New Findings in Physics Research (Dislocation Generation and Propagation across the Seed in Seed Cast-Si Ingots)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Physics Week -- Data detailed on Physics Research have been presented. According to news reporting from Ibaraki, Japan, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "We have studied the dislocation generation and propagation from the seed crystals during seed cast Si growth. The grown ingot was cut into a vertical wafer, followed by the dislocation imaging using X-ray topography and Secco etching."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from National Institute for Materials Science, "The dislocation behavior at the seed area was compared with the dislocation generation at the top surface due to the thermal stress during cooling. The dislocations at the seed/crystal interface have propagated on the {111} plane toward top. When the seed surface was not melted sufficiently, the interface defect density became high, but no clear dislocation propagation was recognized. This suggests that the thermal shock at the seed/melt interface was not high enough to propagate dislocations to the growth direction. A certain amount of dislocations has been introduced from the top into the ingot according to the thermal stress."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These observations suggest that optimizing the initial growth condition is important to dislocation control."

For more information on this research see: Dislocation Generation and Propagation across the Seed in Seed Cast-Si Ingots. Acta Physica Polonica A, 2014;125(4):1024-1026. Acta Physica Polonica A can be contacted at: Polish Acad Sciences Inst Physics, Al Lotnikow 32-46, Pl-02-668 Warsaw, Poland.

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Miyamura, Natl Inst Mat Sci, MANA Nanoelect Mat Unit, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044, Japan. Additional authors for this research include J. Chen, R.R. Prakash, K. Jiptner, H. Harada and T. Sekiguchi.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Japan, Ibaraki, Physics Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Physics Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters