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Reports from Delft University of Technology Describe Recent Advances in Nanoparticles (Bicontinuous Microemulsions for High Yield Wet Synthesis of...

August 29, 2014



Reports from Delft University of Technology Describe Recent Advances in Nanoparticles (Bicontinuous Microemulsions for High Yield Wet Synthesis of Ultrafine Platinum Nanoparticles: Effect of Precursors and Kinetics)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- A new study on Nanoparticles is now available. According to news reporting originating from Delft, Netherlands, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "We demonstrate that for high yield wet synthesis of monodispersed nanoparticles high surfactant content bicontinuous microemulsions offer an advantageous template as particle size is limited by the embedding matrix whereas particle aggregation is largely prohibited by its structure. We synthesized platinum nanoparticles varying the reaction rate, metal precursor and reducing agent type and concentration, and the composition of the microemulsion in water content and oil type."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Delft University of Technology, "High yields of up to 0.4% of metal produced per weight of template were achieved without affecting the particle size, ca. 2 nm. We showed that our method is robust in the sense that particle size is hardly dependent on synthesis conditions. This is attributed to the fact that the packing of surfactant on nanoparticle surfaces is the only parameter determining the particle size. It can only be slightly varied with ionic strength, headgroup hydration, and tail solvency through oil variation. Water content mainly affects the microemulsion stability and through that the colloidal stability of the nanoparticles. Hydrazine as a reducing agent poses a special case as it causes dimerization of the surfactant and hence modifies the surfactant parameter as well as the stability."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Finally, we highlighted the differences in comparison to nanoparticle synthesis in standard water-in-oil microemulsions, and we propose a mechanism of particle formation."

For more information on this research see: Bicontinuous Microemulsions for High Yield Wet Synthesis of Ultrafine Platinum Nanoparticles: Effect of Precursors and Kinetics. Langmuir, 2014;30(28):8300-8307. Langmuir can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Langmuir - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/langd5)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting E. Negro, Delft University of Technology, Dept. of Chem Engn, NL-2628 BL Delft, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include R. Latsuzbaia and G.J.M. Koper (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Delft, Europe, Netherlands, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Science Letter


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