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Study Data from J.E. Habben and Colleagues Update Understanding of Alkenes (Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in...

August 27, 2014



Study Data from J.E. Habben and Colleagues Update Understanding of Alkenes (Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in maize under field drought-stress conditions)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- New research on Alkenes is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Johnston, Iowa, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "A transgenic gene-silencing approach was used to modulate the levels of ethylene biosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) and determine its effect on grain yield under drought stress in a comprehensive set of field trials. Commercially relevant transgenic events were created with down-regulated ACC synthases (ACSs), enzymes that catalyse the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research, "These events had ethylene emission levels reduced approximately 50% compared with nontransgenic nulls. Multiple, independent transgenic hybrids and controls were tested in field trials at managed drought-stress and rain-fed locations throughout the US. Analysis of yield data indicated that transgenic events had significantly increased grain yield over the null comparators, with the best event having a 0.58 Mg/ha (9.3 bushel/acre) increase after a flowering period drought stress. A (genotype 9 transgene) 9 environment interaction existed among the events, highlighting the need to better understand the context in which the down-regulation of ACSs functions in maize. Analysis of secondary traits showed that there was a consistent decrease in the anthesis-silking interval and a concomitant increase in kernel number/ear in transgene-positive events versus nulls. Selected events were also field tested under a low-nitrogen treatment, and the best event was found to have a significant 0.44 Mg/ha (7.1 bushel/acre) yield increase."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This set of extensive field evaluations demonstrated that down-regulating the ethylene biosynthetic pathway can improve the grain yield of maize under abiotic stress conditions."

For more information on this research see: Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in maize under field drought-stress conditions. Plant Biotechnology Journal, 2014;12(6):685-693. Plant Biotechnology Journal can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Plant Biotechnology Journal - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-7652)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.E. Habben, DuPont Pioneer, Johnston, IA 50131, United States. Additional authors for this research include X.M. Bao, N.J. Bate, J.L. DeBruin, D. Dolan, D. Hasegawa, T.G. Helentjaris, R.H. Lafitte, N. Lovan, H. Mo, K. Reimann and J.R. Schussler (see also Alkenes).

Keywords for this news article include: Iowa, Alkenes, Johnston, Ethylenes, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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