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Studies in the Area of Biology and Medical Research Reported from North Carolina State University (Application of next generation sequencing to CEPH...

August 25, 2014



Studies in the Area of Biology and Medical Research Reported from North Carolina State University (Application of next generation sequencing to CEPH cell lines to discover variants associated with FDA approved chemotherapeutics)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Pharma Business Week -- Investigators publish new report on Health and Medicine. According to news reporting originating from Raleigh, North Carolina, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The goal of this study was to perform candidate gene association with cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics in cell line models through resequencing and discovery of rare and low frequency variants along with common variations. Here, an association study of cytotoxicity response to 30 FDA approved drugs was conducted and we applied next generation targeted sequencing technology to discover variants from 103 candidate genes in 95 lymphoblastoid cell lines from 14 CEPH pedigrees."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from North Carolina State University, "In this article, we called variants across 95 cell lines and performed association analysis for cytotoxic response using the Family Based Association Testing method and software. We called 2281 variable SNP genotypes across the 103 genes for these cell lines and identified three genes of significant association within this marker set. Specifically, ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 5 (ABCC5), metallothionein 1A (MT1A) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1 (NQO1) were significantly associated with oxaliplatin drug response. The significant SNP on NQO1 (rs1800566) has been linked with poor survival rates in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with cisplatin (which belongs to the same class of drugs as oxaliplatin). A SNP (rs1846692) near the 5' region of MT1A was associated with arsenic trioxide. The results from this study are promising and this serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration of the use of sequencing data in the cytotoxicity models of human cell lines."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "With increased sample sizes, such studies will be a fast and powerful way to associate common and rare variants with drug response; while overcoming the cost and time limitations to recruit cohorts for association study."

For more information on this research see: Application of next generation sequencing to CEPH cell lines to discover variants associated with FDA approved chemotherapeutics. Bmc Research Notes, 2014;7():360. (BioMed Central - www.biomedcentral.com/; Bmc Research Notes - www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting G.D. Hariani, Bioinformatics Research Center, North Carolina State University, 307 Ricks Hall, 1 Lampe Dr, Raleigh, NC 27695 CB7566, United States. Additional authors for this research include E.J. Lam, T. Havener, P.Y. Kwok, H.L. McLeod, M.J. Wagner and A.A Motsinger-Reif (see also Health and Medicine).

Keywords for this news article include: Raleigh, United States, North Carolina, Health and Medicine, Regulatory Agencies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Pharma Business Week


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