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Researchers from Stanford University Describe Findings in Cancer Gene Therapy (Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using...

August 25, 2014



Researchers from Stanford University Describe Findings in Cancer Gene Therapy (Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using ??Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Gene Therapy Week -- Research findings on Biotechnology are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting from Stanford, California, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Stanford University, "We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with (89)Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 0.64, 2.78 0.26, and 2.31 0.38 at 168 h p.i."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Thus, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention."

For more information on this research see: Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using ??Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody. Biomaterials, 2014;35(25):6964-71. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X. Yang, Asian Liver Center, Dept. of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Additional authors for this research include H. Liu, C.K. Sun, A. Natarajan, X. Hu, X. Wang, M. Allegretta, R.D. Guttmann, S.S. Gambhir, M.S. Chua, Z. Cheng and S.K So (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Antibodies, Biotechnology, Stanford, Oncology, Xenograft, California, Immunology, United States, Blood Proteins, Immunoglobulins, Xenotransplantion, Cancer Gene Therapy, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Gene Therapy Week


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